TCC Coffee Chat with Town of Holly Springs

The Triangle Community Coalition had another successful Coffee Chat with Town of Holly Spring on Wednesday, August 9, 2017!

Joining our members in an informal chat were Mayor Dick Sears, Councilor Jimmy Cobbs,
Councilor Pete Villadsen, Town Manager Chuck Simmons, Economic Development Director Irena Krstanovic, Director of Engineering Kendra Parrish, Director Public Affairs & Communications Joni Powell, Beth Trautz, Planning and Zoning Department, Adam Huffman, Parks & Rec Department.

We provided the Town of Holly Springs with a better perspective of the Triangle Community Coalition's goal to be a proactive partner in growth and land use issues and to work with senior staff and elected officials to develop policies, regulations, and procedures to encourage economic development, produce predictable (yet flexible) outcomes for all stakeholders, and protect the community's interests. 
 

The Town of Holly Springs appreciated the TCC’s ability to offer objective facts and information in efforts to improve public policy debates and create effective working relationships between the business community and local government.  We had some great interaction with the TCC membership in attendance and had opportunity to talk about the following:

Mayor Dick Sears:

         ·         Noted that Holly Springs grew from around 1,000 in 1990 to the current population of 35K

         ·         Holly Springs has a pro-growth goal and their town saying is “Holly Springs - where no one has to leave unless they want to”

         ·         A new hospital is scheduled to start construction in 2018

         ·         Noted that their Director of Engineering Department won “Engineer of the Year”
 

Town Manager Chuck Simmons:

·        Holly Springs is focused on citizens’ quality of life issues for the next 5-10 years

·        The Town is staying ahead of sewer/water needs – the challenge is to stay ahead of the infrastructure needs focusing on highway improvements

·        Holly Springs is investing in educating the public and communications, using social media tools

·        Holly Springs one of the safest communities in the area

·        Will build new soccer fields and stadium with the $20 million parks & rec bond funds

·        The Hunt Recreation Center replaced an old school next to Womble Park and meets the Town’s  recreation needs for the next 20 years

·        15 years ago Holly Springs’ $800 million tax base was 90% residential. Today commercial alone has a tax value of $800 million and as a percentage of the Town’s tax base has grown to 20%

·        Holly Springs is a sustainable community

Economic Development Director Irena Krstanovic:

         ·         Holly Springs was one of the first municipalities to have an Economic Development Director

         ·         In 2002 Holly Springs certified 400 acres for a business park which is now 100% occupied.

         ·         Industrial recruitment requires rooftops first.

         ·         In 2010 Holly Springs was the #1 job creator (by percentage growth) in Wake County

         ·         Holly Springs doesn’t have a “traditional” downtown but has the opportunity to build one and is targeting local investors/developers to come to the ‘”downtown” area to build. The goal is to build 100k square feet commercial space in the next couple of years, creating approximately 100 new jobs

Town Manager Chuck Simmons notes that a local investor created a “Coworking Station” and is adding additional co-working space in the near future.
 

Engineering Director Kendra Parrish:

·        Holly Springs has access to 12 million gallons per day of water and is currently only using 2.5 million gallons per day

·        Wastewater usage is 6 million gallons per day with availability of up to 8 million gallons.  Holly Springs has several wastewater projects in the works

·        Planning a 2018 transportation bond for improvements with currently only 2 grants available to help with transportation improvements

·        The completion of the extension of 540 due to finish in 2021

·        Holly Springs has a great working relationship with NCDOT and Director James Trogdon, resulting in faster communications between the state and Holly Springs

·        Working on an east/west connector for the by-pass (I don’t know what bypass you are referring to)
 

Planning and Zoning Beth Trautz:

         ·         Development submittals – Holly Springs has a published timetable for the approval process that it strives to meet.

         ·         Holly Springs would like to hear ideas from the development community to help streamline the approval process

         ·         Holly Springs is now testing electronic submittals

         ·         Currently if a minor plan amendment is made to the construction drawings, staff can address without restarting the review process

         ·         Inspectors in the field have discretion to make decisions depending on their experience

         ·         Keeping the development approval process moving also helps the Holly Springs staff from getting backed up

         ·         A new gymnasium complex is being planned near Ting Park

         ·         The new public works center to house 50 Holly Springs employees

         ·         Coming in fall 2017 will be a series of “wayfinding” signs around Town to welcome visitors and new Holly Springs residents

         ·         The Mims Park storm water device is under design with project completion estimated in spring 2018.  Holly Springs put out to bid and did not receive any response.  Will relook the plans and re-bid.

Town Manager Chuck Simmons commented that educating local legislators to transportation needs in a rapidly growing area is essential.

TCC Discussion:

         ·         TCC members asked Holly Springs their build-out population projection.  The Town replied that they are currently working on updating the numbers.  They estimate that the Town is adding an average of 1800 new people per year with an ultimate build out of around 60,000.

         ·         TCC members noted that Holly Springs’ construction specifications make it one of the more expensive municipalities in which to develop.  The staff noted that they have adjusted their specifications to address past lessons learned.  They stated that the Town would like to engage the development community to discuss why it is so expensive and to come up with alternate methods.  Holly Springs Staff will reach out to TCC members as they go forward with this effort

         ·         TCC member noted that the Parks and Rec fee changed from $1,500 to $3,000 per home with no notification to, nor consultation with, the development community.  The TCC is looking for an official notification and fee revision process along the lines used by Raleigh during their recent Fee Review process.  Holly Spring invited the development community to join their “Notify Me” on their website homepage to get the most recent updates.  Paul Kane also invited the town staff to use the HBA as a conduit to help reach the development community

         ·         TCC Members on the Wake County Affordable Housing Steering Committee noted that higher density is needed in every municipality because land, development and construction costs are not going down.

         ·         TCC members asked if there was a way for the town to increase their credit card limit.

Holly Springs staff noted that currently credit card fees are passed on to the town.  Staff committed to looking into increasing the amount and possibly passing the fees onto to the user.

         ·         TCC members asked if the Parks and Rec fees could be charged at house permit rather than up-front at plat recordation.  The Town will look into this.

         ·         TCC members asked for the Town’s vision for the Southwest area of Holly Springs, an area for which the Town is not currently processing rezoning requests.  Holly Spring replied that they would start with public and internal meetings.  Educate and engage the public for input to include changes and use of existing land, transportation impacts, needs for rezoning or if it meets current zoning to move forward.

         ·         TCC and HBA to be at the table during these meetings to include their input. 

Jacob Rogers noted that development is not creating housing demand but responding to the need.

TCC Coffee Chat with Town of Knightdale

The Triangle Community Coalition had another successful Coffee Chat with Town of Knightdale on Wednesday, July 26, 2017

Joining our members in an informal chat were Mayor Pro Tem Randy Young, Councilor Pete Mangum, Councilor Mark Swan, Assistant Town Manager Bill Summers, Development Service Director Chris Hills, Admin. Service Director Suzanne Yeatts, Chief Lawrence Capps, Capt. Jacqui Poykir, Chief Tim Guffey, Public Works Department Phillip Bunton, & PIO Jonas Silver.

We provided the Town of Knightdale with a better perspective of the Triangle Community Coalition's goal to be a proactive partner in growth and land use issues and to work with senior staff and elected officials to develop policies, regulations, and procedures to encourage economic development, produce predictable (yet flexible) outcomes for all stakeholders, and protect the community's interests. 
 

The Town of Knightdale appreciated the TCC’s ability to offer objective facts and information in efforts to improve public policy debates and create effective working relationships between the business community and local government.  We had some great interaction with the TCC membership in attendance and had opportunity to talk about the following:

Mayor Pro Randy Young:

         ·         Welcomed the TCC to Knightdale and noted the packet to include quick fact data sheet about Knightdale

Councilor Pete Mangum:

·        Growth has been good in Knightdale allowing places like Knightdale Station Park to be so successful

·        Knightdale is managing growth in a quality way by clarifying growth in a positive context to public

·        Has a diversity of housing available

·        Water merger with City of Raleigh will be complete this year

Councilor Mark Swan:

·        Knightdale to be a destination – sense of place and people

Assistant Town Manager Bill Summers:

·        Knightdale focused on who they are going to be as they grow

·        Upcoming UDO updates and regulatory updates

·        Local transportation plan will allow Knightdale to manage it case by case and development by development

·        Multi family needs to be acceptable to community vision

·        Challenges for the next decade are that public comments are more robust

 Development Service Director Chris Hills:

·        Knightdale new fiscal year started on July 1, 2017.  They saw a substantial increase in new single family permits issued

·        Permits were up 17% from 2016 and 75% from 2015

·        Knightdale issued 81 commercial building permits and expect this number to increase in the coming year

·        Completed Harper Park & Knightdale Station Village part of the master plan concept

·        New stage for Knightdale Station Park Amphitheater

·        Adding a new police substation

·        Commercial growth includes 2 new industrial parks

·        Greenway extensions to connect to Raleigh greenway and Knightdale Station Park

·        Received grants to make improvements to greenways

·        60/40 Residential/Commercial mix

·        Comp plan is outdated because legislation has changed things.  Knightdale is half way through the comp plan> UDO changes to follow text changes. 

·        Can effect affordability

·        Asked TCC for input on text change items

·        Need to improve school perception.  PTA has a 7K budget compare to Cary’s 40K budget.

·        Town is working to create the need for north/south connectors to Hodge Road

Fire Chief Guffey:

·        Staff looks at school options and tend to go outside of Knightdale

·        Some live in Knightdale
Captain Capps:

·        Over ½ of police department live in Knightdale

TCC comments:

         ·         TCC members noted that development and building requirements create burdens that roll into the cost of building a home in Knightdale

         ·         David Lazzo noted younger generation generally wants smaller homes and lot sizes.  Median age of home ownership in Knightdale is 34 years of age.

         ·         Marty Clayton, Duke Energy working with Town is a partnership.  Infrastructure is needed with growth.

TCC July 2017 In the KNOW

July 2017 Updates

State:

  • The N.C. General Assembly worked into the early morning hours on June 30 to finish its business for the 2017 legislative session. The session officially began January 11 and ran for six months for a total of 93 legislative days.  During the six month session, 92 bills were enacted into law, 45 of which became law without the governor’s signature.  The legislature will return for two additional legislative sessions in 2017. It will convene on August 3 and again on September 6 to consider veto overrides, make appointments and approve bills that are currently in negotiations between the House and Senate. The September session also allows the legislature to take up constitutional issues, judicial redistricting, and any court-ordered re-districting. Legislators have a self-imposed deadline of November 15 to consider revising the legislative maps that were ruled unconstitutional by the courts. The 2018 legislative session will begin Wednesday, May 16 at noon.
  • Starting in 2019, thousands of North Carolinians will see lower state income tax bills.  The standard deduction level will rise for both single and married filers, and the income tax rate will drop.  The tax plan, part of the new state budget that the legislature passed over a veto from Gov. Roy Cooper, would reduce the personal income tax rate from 5.499 percent to 5.25 percent.  It would raise the standard deduction – the amount on which people pay no income taxes unless they itemize – to $20,000 for married couples filing jointly from $17,500.  It would also lower the corporate income tax rate to 2.5 percent from 3 percent.
  • Utility regulators are postponing until Thanksgiving a hearing to decide whether to allow a 15 percent increase in the electricity bills of 1.3 million North Carolina customers.  The North Carolina Utilities Commission is acting at the request of consumer advocates to delay hearing from expert witnesses until November 20 in Raleigh.  The commission's decision last week postpones plans to question energy experts a month earlier.  The commission plans to hold public meetings in September and October in Rockingham, Raleigh, Asheville, Snow Hill and Wilmington on Duke Energy Progress' request to charge an extra $477 million a year. That would mean $18 more per month for the typical household bill of $105.

Regional:

  • The Triangle has claimed yet another spot on a top list of notable places; this time for being called out for the cost of rent.  Out of the 50 most expensive zip codes to rent an apartment in North Carolina, the Triangle has more than half of the listings, according to the website Rent Café.  The North Carolina Housing Coalition says around 45 percent of renters in Wake, Durham, and Orange Counties are cost-burdened.  According to NCHC, rent should be around 30 percent of income. The average apartment rent in Wake County is around $900. NCHC says the local average salary can afford to pay $750.
  • Single-family home sales in the Triangle were up 3 percent in May, with the average sales price up 8 percent year-to-date – but sales in Wake County have been lagging for two months.  According to the Triangle Multiple Listing Service, sales in Wake County were down 2.2 percent in May compared to the year prior and averaged nearly $332,000. Wake County sales in April had also been down by a rate of 1.2 percent.  The report indicates that buyers who can’t afford – or don’t want to pay – the higher home prices in Wake County neighborhoods have started looking to neighboring counties where homes are less expensive.  Home sales in Durham County, where the average home price was $250,106 in May, increased 12.4 percent to a volume of 562 units sold. Durham’s average home price is up 6.9 percent year-to-date.  Johnston County sales were up 6.4 percent to 380 units, with an average price of $211,535 which is an increase of 7.8 percent year-to-date.  Orange County home sales, where the average price is nearly $389,000, was flat with 224 units sold in May, the same number as the year prior.  Orange County’s average home price is down 1.7 percent year-to-date.  All of the Triangle’s core counties have been working with an anemic level of inventory of homes for sale since 2014, and in May, the inventory level dropped to 2.5 months of supply.  The average days on market dropped to 42 days in May compared to a 48-day average in May the year prior.
  • Upcoming road improvement projects in the Cary/Morrisville area:
    • Realigning Morrisville-Carpenter Road from NC 55 to Louis Stephens Drive.  Construction will start early next year.
    • Widening Green Level Road from NC 55 to NC 540. Construction began last month.
    • Extending O’Kelly Chapel Road from Parkside Town Commons to Little Drive.  Construction is due to begin and end in 2018.
    • Studying connecting McCrimmon Parkway from NC 55 to Louis Stephens Drive.
    • Widening Carpenter Fire Station Road from the NC 540 bridge at Cameron Pond to NC 55. Construction is scheduled to start in fiscal year 2019.
    • Widening Aviation Parkway and making improvements to the I-40 interchange. This work would occur west of NC54 to east of the interstate interchange.  The project is funded by NCDOT.  Construction is not expected to begin until 2023.

Chatham County:

  • After nearly 18 months of development with broad public input, Chatham County announces that the final draft of its Comprehensive Plan will be available for public comment until August 28, 2017
    The plan is designed to cover the next 25 years.  Residents can view the final draft plan and provide public comment online at www.chathamnc.org/comprehensiveplan or submit written comments to the Planning Department at PO Box 54, Pittsboro NC 27312.  A public hearing on the plan has also been scheduled for Monday, August 21, at 6 pm in the Historic Courthouse in Pittsboro.

Wake County:

  • Wake County drivers are now paying more for their license plate and registration fees.  The county is now charging a $7 vehicle registration tax, which started on July 1.  Starting August 1, Wake County drivers also will pay an extra $3 registration fee.  The fees, along with a half cent increase to the county sales tax rate approved by voters last fall, will help pay for the voter-approved Wake Transit Plan which includes expanded rail and bus service.  Wake County leaders said the expanded transportation services are needed to help accommodate the growth in the county.  Wake County adds about 450 people new residents each week. 
  • The county’s Affordable Housing Steering Committee is working to come up with short and long-term solutions to address a shortage of affordable housing options in the county.  The committee will present its recommendations to the Wake County Board of Commissioners in September

Apex:

  • Council adopted a revised policy regarding Town Participation in Utility Projects which effectively replace Acreage Fees and Capacity Fees with a Capital Reimbursement Fee.  Developers are now limited to reimbursement of the incremental cost difference for oversized water and sewer improvements not to exceed 20% of the Capital Reimbursement Fees owed by the Developer and future Third Party Developers for a period of 10 years
  • The town introduced a bond order authorizing up to $48 million for Parks and Recreational Facilities
  • Council approved the Rezoning of approx. 14 acres on Green Level West Road across from the new West Apex High School for Neighborhood Business
  • Council approved the Annexation of approx. 185 acres and Rezoning of approx. 204 acres for the proposed Friendship Station PUD located at the south side of Humie Olive Road, east of Olive Farm Road, and west side of Richardson Road.  The proposed development also amends the 2030 Land Use Map from Low to Medium and Medium to High Density Residential with Mixed Medium to High Density Residential and Commercial Services and added Office Employment
  • Council considered the Rezoning to add approx. 12.35 acres to the Villages of Apex South PUD (formerly Trackside Development) for Mixed Use – Retail/Office/Public and Civic/Attached Residential
  • Council considered the JPM South Development’s proposed West Village Master Subdivision Plan for up to 86 single family and 294 townhome units on approx. 163 acres at Old US1 Highway and Kelly Road
  • Council approved Crescent Communities’ proposed Linden Master Subdivision for up to 200 single family lots on approx. 87 acres located on Pricewood Lane with access from Olive Chapel Road.

Cary:

  • During the month of June, the Town issued 194 single family permits.  This is the most single family permits issued in a month since at least 2009.  Historical permitting data can be found on the Town’s website. 
  • Over the past few years, two locations for Wegmans stores in Cary have been discussed: one by Cary Towne Center and one off of Davis Drive.  On July 13, the Town Council unanimously approved the Davis Drive location.  The current plan is for construction to begin in Spring 2018, with completion near the second half of 2019.

·       On July 27, Town Council approved the sale and consumption of alcoholic beverages at permitted establishments at 10am on Sunday’s in line with the recently passed “Brunch Bill”.

·       Council held a public hearing on a request to rezone 22 acres in South Cary for age restricted detached residential.

·       Council approved appropriating $750,000 toward the Morrisville Pkwy and NC 540 interchange project to cover the utility extensions across 540.

Durham (City):

Fuquay-Varina:

  • The North Carolina Department of Transportation wants input from the public about its expansion plans for a ten-mile stretch of Highway 55 in Angier.  The department intends to either introduce a bypass to the highway on the east or west side of the town or to widen the existing road in order to reduce congestion and futureproof the two-lane highway.  The department will hold a corridor study for the length of the road between the south of Oak Grove Church Road near Angier and Highway 42 in Fuquay-Varina.  The span of the highway being expanded crosses the line between Harnett County and Wake County.  Members of the public can request more information or submit comments by contacting the NCDOT Project Developmental Engineer, Kim Gillespie, by phone at 919-707-6023, by email at klgillespie@ncdot.gov, or by mail at 1548 Mail Service Center, Raleigh, N.C., 27699.  All comments on the project should be submitted by August 21.
  • The Town has four property owners on board with turning 3.7 acres of land into a multi-story building with retail, office space and apartments. The Town will also contribute $1.9 million from their Capital Improvement Plan fund to build a parking structure for the project.  Now they just need a developer.
  • On July 10th, the 2035 Community Transportation Plan (CTP) was adopted by the Town Board after a year of outreach and visioning with the community.  The staff worked in concert with transportation consultant Kimley-Horn to prepare the plan, incorporating feedback from stakeholders and citizens during numerous public meetings and efforts.  The adopted plan replaces the 2006 Community Transportation Plan and defines future transportation goals, funding strategies, and designs to prepare for future road needs.  The Plan also identifies near, mid-term and long-term projects.  View the presentation on the 2035 Community Transportation Plan.

Garner:

  • Garner opened its new Town Hall for business on July 21. The two-story, 26,000-square-foot municipal building is located at 900 7th Ave.--the location of the old Town Hall, which was torn down to make way for the larger, more modern structure. The building will enable Town staff to meet the needs of citizens, businesses and the development community for the foreseeable future. The new building houses most of the Development Services team (Planning, Inspections and Engineering) in one area on the first floor and features a one-stop customer service intake area.  Both the Economic Development and the Town Manager’s offices are located on the second floor. The Town will hold an official ribbon cutting at a later date. The project was made possible by bond funds approved by Garner voters in 2013.
  • Improved Nature, a start-up company that manufactures soy-based meat-substitute products, began production in July at its new 30,000-square-foot facility in Garner.  For more information, contact Garner Economic Development Director Joe Stallings at jstallings@garnernc.gov     

Morrisville:

  • Town Council member TJ Cawley announced that he would challenge incumbent Mark Stohlman in November’s mayoral race.  Cawley, a registered Democrat, was first elected to the Morrisville council in 2013.  He has publicly disagreed with Stohlman, who was elected mayor the same year, about a variety of issues, including town spending, council district maps and rezoning cases.

·       On July 25, Town Council approved the sale and consumption of alcoholic beverages at permitted establishments at 10am on Sunday’s in line with the recently passed “Brunch Bill”.

Raleigh:

  • Raleigh city council members voted to approve a new goal of adding more affordable housing to the city.  Numbers provided by the city show 32,000 households are considered “cost burdened.”  That means more than 30 percent of their income goes to rent and utilities.  The city’s goal is to add 5,700 affordable housing units to the city over the next 10 years – which equals about 570 a year.  That includes both rental and homeownership units, with an emphasis on rental.

Wake Forest:

  • Dozens of residents argue that proposed plans for new townhomes will not fit in their neighborhood.  The application for a new subdivision under review by the Town of Wake Forest is for at least 40 townhomes in a 4.5 acre lot at 1047 North Main St.  The application, submitted in June, could be debated by the town's planning board as early as September.  Wake Forest has experienced a growth spurt in the last several years.  A review of town plans shows 39 approved subdivisions since 2010, which account for 6,766 new homes.

Wendell:

  • The Wendell Town Manager hinted at the need for a bond referendum to pay for capital projects, but that poll won’t take place this year.  For the fiscal year that starts July 1, staff is recommending a $7.3 million budget that includes improved yard waste collection and a more permanent police station.  It also calls for several improvements at Wendell Park.

TCC Updates:
Welcome to new members Dwight Bassett, Economic Dev. Director, Town of Chapel Hill!
The TCC organizes monthly Coffee Chats with municipalities across the Triangle. This type of event provides TCC members with the opportunity to have an informal but intimate conversation with elected officials and senior staff
about the area's growth and development. The chats are a TCC Member Only event! 
For more information, please contact Charlene at charlenel@tricc.org
 

Upcoming Luncheon Learn Programs in 2017:
October (TBD) Completion of 540

November (TBD) Dix Master Plan

Other Events:
September 21, 2017 – Political Pig Pickin’ at Angus Barn.  Get ready for an old fashion political rally and candidate forum, with style!  Candidates throughout the region have the opportunity to mingle with hundreds of potential voters. 
Sponsorships are available for all events. 
Visit http://www.tricc.org/2017-sponsorship-opportunities/ for more information!
To register for this Event visit our website at http://www.tricc.org/political/

TCC Membership Information
In 2017 we will act to:

  • Influence public policy
  • Promote responsible stewardship by government
  • Shape public opinion through education
  • Provide solutions for community issues

If you are not a member of the TCC, please join now and commit your resources to help us.  If you are a TCC member, get ready for a year of action.  We cannot hold our peace and leave the future of this region in the hands of those who fail to understand the benefits of growth, the very growth that has made the Triangle the best place to live in the country. 

“Act now or forever hold your peace.”

TCC "in the KNOW" June 2017 Issue

June 2017 Updates

State:

  • The state Senate gave final approval to repealing Orange County's power to impose impact fees on development to pay for schools and other public facilities.  House Bill 406 takes effect immediately. It is a local bill, so it's not subject to the governor's approval or veto.
  • The North Carolina General Assembly overrode Gov. Roy Cooper’s veto, approving its two-year state government spending plan.
  • In the budget, North Carolina businesses will see the corporate tax rate lowered from 3 percent to 2.5 percent beginning in 2019. North Carolina already has the lowest-rate corporate income tax in the country, according to the Tax Foundation.

Chatham County:

  • On June 19, 2017, the Chatham County Board of Commissioners approved a revised budget for fiscal year 2017-18 that keeps the tax rate of $0.6281 (or 62.81 cents) recommended by the County Manager’s Office. However, additional revenues identified since early May allowed a few more items to be included in the approved budget. Most of the new revenue is related to the appeals process for the 2017 revaluation of real property. The county had fewer valuations adjusted due to appeals than had been conservatively estimated. This provided an additional $595,237. The total general fund budget approved is $110.9 million.
  • The adopted FY18 budget includes a $450,000 appropriation for the Town of Pittsboro. The funds will help the town buy land in downtown Pittsboro for a future town hall complex, where the county is considering renting office space. The county’s financial contribution is expected to be offset by future reductions in the county’s rental lease. If the county does not end up leasing space in the facility, the town would have to refund the $450,000. 
  • The Full proposed budget can be found on Chatham County website at  www.chathamnc.org 
    The approved budget should be posted there by July 12, 2017.

Durham County:

  • The Durham City Council approved a $429.4 million budget for the upcoming fiscal year that invests in affordable housing, public safety, and infrastructure.  The budget includes a property tax rate increase of 1.79 cents in order to dedicate a second penny of the tax rate to affordable housing and hire thirty new fire fighters, among other investments. The property tax rate will increase to 57.86 cents per $100 of property value.  The average homeowner will pay about $32 more in property taxes than last year as a result of the increase.  A penny of the tax rate generates about $2.8 million in annual revenue. The city has a five-year goal of preserving or creating 1,150 affordable units.
  • During the week of June 26, the Durham City-County Planning Department held public workshops for two separate rezoning and community planning efforts.  The Erwin Road Compact Design District: Kick-Off Workshop, was held on Tuesday, June 27th.  This initial workshop introduced the project to the general public and solicited preliminary ideas and concerns. The project is expected to run two years from kick-off to adoption. This project will seek to rezone 412 acres of property in the vicinity of Erwin and Hillsborough Roads for mixed-use, higher density, and more pedestrian friendly development (referred to as a “compact design district”). Project manager is Matt Filter, Senior planner, Matthew.Filter@durhamnc.gov.
  • The  Angier-Driver Planning and Zoning Study: Public Workshop, was held on Thursday, June 29th  This workshop informed and engaged residents regarding commercial zoning impediments in the neighborhood and discussedhow to align zoning with the neighborhood’s vision. Project Manager is Hannah Jacobson, AICP, Senior Planner, Hannah.Jacobson@durhamnc.gov.

Orange County:

  • The Orange County County-wide revaluation of real property will go into effect for fiscal 2018 tax year.  While individual taxpayers will see their tax bill change depending on the change in the valuation of their property, the Town is adopting a revenue neutral tax rate that is designed to generate the same revenue as the previous year.  In other words, for the average taxpayer Town taxes will stay about the same.  However, most taxpayers are not average and will see some change in their bill based on the change in the assessed value of their property.  The recommended revenue neutral tax rate is 50.8 cents per $100 of assessed valuation, reduced from 52.4 cents in the current year. The following table illustrates the calculation of Town taxes using the revenue neutral tax rate for a hypothetical average taxpayer. 

Wake County: 

  • The Wake County Board of Commissioners voted 5-2 to approve the coming year’s budget.  Two commissioners Greg Ford and Jessica Holmes – said they voted against the budget because there was not enough school funding.

Apex:

  • A development plan for a new mixed-use professional park in Apex that was approved with a split Town Council vote in the fall is on track to start construction on phase one in July.

Carrboro:

  • The Town of Carrboro is searching for members to fill the seats of its new Affordable Housing Board, to consist of; 
    • Five residents of the Town of Carrboro
    • One resident of the Town’s extraterritorial zoning jurisdiction or the Town
    • One member who need not be a resident of the Town of Carrboro, but who must possess special expertise related to affordable housing.

Cary:

  • The Town Council voted 5-2 to approve a rezoning that will allow Habitat for Humanity of Wake County to build seven homes on Trimble Avenue near Chatham Street.  Neighbors were concerned when the project called for more than triple that amount of housing units, saying the plan didn’t make sense and didn’t fit with the neighborhood.  They’ve also been concerned about development leading to flooding during storms.
  • The construction and activity report for May included the following:
    • Cary had 8% of the county’s single family permits which is the 5th most.
    • Cary’s single family permits were down 34% from the previous month.
    • The average single family dwelling in May was 3830 square feet compared to 3537 square feet in May of 2013.
  • People who live on Urban Drive in downtown Cary are fighting hard against a proposal to rezone a plot of land for five townhomes.  The plot itself is small and already has a home on it.  The rezoning request will go before Planning Board next.
  • Town Council also heard a plan to rezone 5.88 acres near the intersection of NW Cary Parkway and Evans Road to turn it from Office and Institutional to Residential Multi-family, with a plan to put in seven townhomes per acre.  The developer argued that no one has developed this land for 20 years and said it was not suitable for office space.
  • The Town Council approved 205 apartment homes known as Hillstone at Alston Town Center at the last Quasi-judicial meeting.  The developer also obtained approval for a 30% parking reduction. 

Chapel Hill:

  • A $6 increase in the annual stormwater fee is included in the final budget. The increase will be used to fund operating costs and to pay for debt service on stormwater general obligation bonds that will be issued to fund priority infrastructure improvement projects including those identified in the Lower Booker Creek Subwatershed Study.
  • The adopted budget continues the Town Council’s commitment to affordable housing programs with an amount equal to one cent on the tax rate or $688,395. In total, the Town spends about $5.2 million annually on affordable housing programs including management of 336 dwelling units in 13 public housing neighborhoods.

Durham (City):

  • The Durham City Council rejected a rezoning request that would have brought a mixed-use shopping center to Guess Road.  The vote was 6-1 against the request.  The North River Village shopping center would have been anchored by Durham’s first Publix supermarket.  Many of the seven members of the city council said they’re in favor of bringing a Publix to Durham — just not in that location.
  • The Durham City Council approved a $4.162 million grant that will allow the Durham Housing Authority to buy back twenty acres of vacant land known as Fayette Place.  The money will come from the city’s general fund and can only be used to acquire the land and maintain it until it is sold or developed.

Garner:

  • The Garner Town Council on June 20 unanimously passed a $33.2 million operating budget for FY 2017-18 that keeps the property tax rate unchanged at 53.25 cents per $100 of assessed valuation. The budget prepares the Town to better handle the demands of growth by funding a new planner position and conversion of a code enforcement position and fire inspector position from part time to full time.

Holly Springs:

  • Holly Springs recently signed on to a public-private partnership that will bring a new row of downtown shops to South Main Street near town hall.  The plan calls for retail space on the ground floor, offices and apartments above and a parking deck around back.  A group of investors called 242 South Main LLC has agreed to build a 45,000-square-foot commercial building with a minimum of 10,000 square feet of retail space.

Morrisville:

  • Plans for developing a Morrisville Downton have been in the works since 2016.  Morrisville Assistant Town Manager said the town was consulting with DFI (Development Finance Initiative) to determine what the right balance is for commercial and residential development.  At the June 27 Morrisville Town Council meeting, the Council discussed not only the site plan, but discussed the details for the public/private partnership that the town is aiming for with the town center.  Following the Town Council meeting and a vote on the site plan, a request for Proposal (RFP) will go out in July if the plan passed.  

For more information on the results of this council meeting, please contact the Town of Morrisville at TownCouncil@townofmorrisville.org

Raleigh:

  • After more than two years of uncertainty, Raleigh is one step closer to regulating short-term rentals.  A task force voted on a plan that would allow short-term housing in Raleigh and forwarded that plan to the full city council.  The plan would create three separate types of housing, requiring the owner or manager to be at the property at least some of the time.  Council has to forward the proposal to the Planning Commission.  A change of zoning is required, so public hearings would follow.  The council would then need to approve the final plan.
  • A $2-million renovation to the open area on Fayetteville Street is included in the City Manager’s proposed budget.  With its proximity to hotels and the Convention Center, City Plaza has become one of the most visited areas in downtown Raleigh.  However, some city leaders say that foot traffic has led to some wear and tear and the area is in need of some repairs.  The renovations are part of a proposed budget that increases spending by nearly $60 million.  The city wants to offset the cost by raising property taxes by 0.7 cents, raising it to 42.5 cents per $100 in valuation.
  • The City of Raleigh is updating the 2030 Comprehensive Plan, the key policy document that shapes the physical development of the city. Residents are invited to attend one or all five public meetings to learn about how the Comprehensive Plan addresses five areas: resiliency, housing, development transitions, transportation and sustainability.  Four meetings have already occurred, the last (fifth) being on Tuesday, July 11, 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at Campbell Lodge in Durant Nature Preserve, 3237 Spottswood St. The meeting’s theme will be sustainability or focusing on the interdependent relationships of environmental stewardship, economic strength, and social integrity. These three elements define the vision for sustainability.  City of Raleigh staff will be in attendance to discuss these key themes and provide guidance as to how citizens can comment and provide feedback about the Comprehensive Plan Update. The Comprehensive Plan addresses 13 elements of physical development including land use, transportation, housing, environmental protection, and economic development. Other sections focus on quality of life topics from open space, parks, recreation, and historic preservation to arts and culture. Area specific policy guidance for rezoning’s and a framework for implementation are also key pieces of the document. 
  • Over the next 100 days, from Friday, June 2 through September, the Department of City Planning will host 100 events where the community can engage with multiple city planning efforts. What does this look like?  There will be pop-up events entitled “Talk to a Planner “ at outdoor events like the Downtown Farmer’s Market, Market and Exchange plazas, a series of First Friday events around Downtown, and various community meetings throughout Raleigh. The intent is to make city planning fun, approachable, and understandable. Some pop-up events will be project specific where the Department of City Planning will be soliciting and documenting feedback; and others will be informational in nature and provide insight into the day in the life of a planner.  The Department of City Planning will host educational lectures “UDC Talks @ Noon and “UDC Talks @ Night” that cover topics important to the development of Raleighinclusivity, ecology, access, arts and culture, history, transportation, economic development, and connectivity, among others. After the speaker is finished each event includes an open question-and-answer period.  There will be Project Specific Community Meetings and Workshops for area plans, corridor studies and Raleigh’s 2030 Comprehensive Plan Update. These meetings provide residents an opportunity to provide feedback that will help to shape Raleigh’s built environment and open space.  And finally there are Process Required Meetings that are the bread and butter of planning: the Planning CommissionRaleigh Historic Development Commission, and the Appearance Commission. All of these meetings are open to the public, provide insight into the work of city planners, and allow the community to learn about development in their neighborhood.  Information gathered at the 100 meetings will be used to influence specific planning efforts and/or provide insight into effective outreach methodologies. 
    Visit the city website at www.raleighnc.gov/planning or follow @RaleighPlanning on twitter, #Planning100x100 for details about upcoming meetings and how you can play a part in shaping Raleigh’s future.

Wendell:

  • Staff plans to keep the current property tax rate of 49 cents per $100 of assessed value.  At that rate, a resident in a home valued at $150,000 would pay $735 in town taxes.  In Wendell, however, the town does not provide fire services like other Wake County municipalities do.  Instead, Wake imposes a fire district tax of almost 10 cents per $100 of assessed valued for the fire protection it provides.  That means Wendell residents should consider their tax rate closer to 58 cents per $100 of assessed value when comparing the town’s rate to those in other Wake towns.

TCC Updates:
Welcome to new members Kolter Land Partners &
Forsyth Investments Company!

The TCC organizes monthly Coffee Chats with municipalities across the Triangle. This type of event provides TCC members with the opportunity to have an informal but intimate conversation with elected officials and senior staff about the area's growth and development. 
The chats are a TCC Member Only event! 
For more information, please contact Charlene at charlenel@tricc.org

Upcoming Coffee Chats:  Save the Dates and All Member Invites will be sent one month prior to the chat!

July 26, 2017 Coffee Chat with Town of Knightdale
August 9, 2017 Coffee Chat with Town of Holly Springs

Upcoming Luncheon Learn Programs in 2017:
October (TBD) Completion of 540
November (TBD) Dix Master Plan

Other Events:

August 4, 2017 - Campaign Training School: 
The Campaign School is designed to give political candidates and their campaign staffs the winning edge!  The full day interactive school is taught by state and national campaign experts who shared their success stories and show the attendees the latest technologies that would benefit their campaigns.  They discuss topics such as; Planning & Budgeting, Elections Laws & Finance Report Deadlines, Fundraising, Voter Lists, Targeting, Identification, Voter Contact, Navigating the New Media & Social Networking.

September 21, 2017 – Political Pig Pickin’ at Angus Barn.  Get ready for an old fashioned political rally and candidate forum, with style!  Candidates throughout the region have the opportunity to mingle with hundreds of potential voters.

Sponsorships are available for all events. 
Visit http://www.tricc.org/2017-sponsorship-opportunities/ for more information!

To register for this Event visit our website at http://www.tricc.org/political/

TCC Membership Information
In 2017 we will act to:

  • Influence public policy
  • Promote responsible stewardship by government
  • Shape public opinion through education
  • Provide solutions for community issues

If you are not a member of the TCC, please join now and commit your resources to help us.  If you are a TCC member, get ready for a year of action.  We cannot hold our peace and leave the future of this region in the hands of those who fail to understand the benefits of growth, the very growth that has made the Triangle the best place to live in the country. 

“Act now or forever hold your peace.”

For more information about TCC membership visit www.tricc.org or call the TCC office at 919 812-7785

A Special Thank You to Our 2017 Members and Sponsors! 

Strategic Members:  HBA Raleigh-Wake County      
                                   Raleigh Regional Association of REALTORS®
   

Partner Members:  PPM, Inc.   Brownlee Whitlow Praet & File PLLC   Colliers International    
Forsyth Investments CompanyTaylor Wiseman & Taylor    Smith Moore Leatherwood


Business Members:  Bass Nixon & Kennedy   Bohler Engineering   CalAtlantic  
Community Properties   Duke Energy   Fern Hill Properties   Gaines & Co.
Fonville Morisey Barefoot   Google Fiber   Grubb Ventures   HHHunt Homes  
JPM South Development   Kane Realty Corporation   K&L Gates  
Kimley-Horn & Associates   Lennar   M/I Homes    McAdams   Pulte GroupMorningstar Law Group   Paragon Commercial Bank   Preston Development   Robuck Homes   Royal Oaks Building GroupSepi Engineering   Smith AndersonThe Bainbridge CompaniesTerramor Homes
Triangle Apartment Association   Triangle Commercial Association of REALTORS®
   
WithersRavenel   Williams Property Group


Chamber/Gov:  Cary Chamber of Commerce    DHIC    Midtown Raleigh Alliance    
Morrisville Chamber of Commerce   Durham Regional Association of REALTORS®
Raleigh Chamber of Commerce  HBA Durham Orange Chatham Counties    
           

Sponsor Members: Sepi Engineering  Allen Tate Company  Crescent Communities
Fuller Land Development   Newland Communities   Ramey Kemp & Associates, Inc.
The Nau Company  Tri PropertiesWithers & RavenelWoodfield Investments, LLC         


Individual Level Member:  Ammons Development Group   ColeJenest & Stone, P.A.
Spectrum Properties Management Co.   Coldwell Banker Advantage  
HBJ Group, Inc.   Gannett Fleming, Inc.   Income Properties   Kolter Land Partners  
Kotarides Developers   Nexsen Pruet   The Banks Law Firm, P.A.  
Thomas C. Worth Law Offices

The TCC Coffee Chat Summary with Town of Cary

The Triangle Community Coalition had another successful Coffee Chat with Town of Cary on Tuesday, June 27, 2017!

Joining our members in an informal chat were Mayor Pro Tem Ed Yerha, Councilor Don Frantz, Assistant Town Manager Russ Overton, Deputy Town Manager Mike Bajorek, Development Service Director Scot Berry, Inspections & Permits Director Ken Hawley and Transportation, & Facilities Manager Jerry Jensen.

We provided the Town of Cary with a better perspective of the Triangle Community Coalition's goal to be a proactive partner in growth and land use issues and to work with senior staff and elected officials to develop policies, regulations, and procedures to encourage economic development, produce predictable (yet flexible) outcomes for all stakeholders, and protect the community's interests. 

The Town of Cary appreciated the TCC’s ability to offer objective facts and information in efforts to improve public policy debates and create effective working relationships between the business community and local government.  We had some great interaction with the TCC membership in attendance and had opportunity to talk about the following:

Mayor Pro Tem Ed Yerha:

         ·         Summarized the 12 goals of the New Cary Community Plan.  The plan can be accessed on their website

         ·         Additional $17million to local economy due to the Arts & Culture initiative 

         ·         Cary Parks & Rec won the 2016 Gold Medal Award for excellence in P&R management

Councilor Don Frantz:

·        Downtown redevelopment: competition is underway amongst national design firms.  The goal is for a spectacular park “nothing seen before” to be a destination as Cary’s Central Park.

·        Private sector interest is up for the downtown area

·        Town is considering a 4-story residential at Harrison & Chatham, Condo’s at Chatham and Urban

·        Older homes in the surrounding downtown area are being torn down with redevelopment

·        Inside the Maynard Loop is the hottest area in Cary

·        Widening is approved along Reedy Creek in hopes to spur new development

Assistant Town Manager Russ Overton:

·        17% land left in Cary for development.  Of that, over half is in the western Cary area.

·        Of the 83% left, some portion will be redevelopment.  Sites are more complex, so development is therefore more difficult

·        “PIT” crew (Policy Implementation Team), a cross department team is prioritizing how the community plan can be implemented by working with Cary citizens

Transportation & Facilities Manager Jerry Jensen:

         ·         Navigating thru municipal government is challenging

         ·         Adding the right people to work more efficiently

         ·         Working with new Town Manager Sean Segall to improve the town’s processes
 

Development Service Director Scot Berry:

·        Decouple the Development Service Department and Development Review from the technical services. 

·        This department encouraged the TCC members to call with questions/issues to make the development review better

Deputy Town Manager Mike Bajorek:

         ·         Focus how to continue to provide high levels of service

Inspections & Permits Director Ken Hawley:

         ·         80-85K permits annually.  95% are next day inspections

         ·         The town if committed to hitting the advertised plan review dates – currently at 92% hit rate on permit review schedule   

         ·         Online Plan submittals is approved to be used for building permits, making it much easier

TCC comments:

         ·         67 people are coming to Wake County every day, many to Cary. Cary must not "remain the same" because status quo of Cary is not the right model.   Town must understand that the TCC goal is to NOT stay the same - our job is to change.  We need to have densification - need condo's/small lots downtown.  People that service this area need to be able to live downtown.  NIMBYism is strong downtown

Q&A:
What does urban infill look like in Cary?

         ·         Councilor Frantz noted “Depends on where it is? Big mixed use near arterials.  Closer to existing neighborhoods might be more dense residential. E.g. Urban Drive mixed use; how do you transition to the neighborhood next door? Scale it down closer to the neighboring use.  Change of use of how people live. Boomer generation wants to downsize and this is recognized by Council.  State property; not looking for big box.  Looking for a better mix.  Downtown is looking for a mix of uses, street level and vertical mix.  Cary has been typically known as NIMBY town, but Council is standing strong about doing the right thing for its citizens, by trying to get away from the NIMBY label.

         ·         Councilor Yerha noted Cary Town Center is going to be a signature redevelopment.

 

What are Council’s thoughts on the Habitat Project? What can we learn to overcome NIMBY ism in Cary?

         ·         Councilor Frantz:  Applicants are willing to work with the neighbors & council to craft projects that TOC will approve. Council will mostly approve rezoning’s if neighbors are in general agreement and when it makes sense.  Focus on getting the application and prove that what is presented to Council early on is actually what is going to be built.  This goes a long way with the Council and the Neighbors/Community.

         ·         Assistant Town Manager Russ Overton - the Comp plan focuses heavily on transitions at the peripheral of certain areas.  You have to look at the whole and focus on the future.
 

What does the term "spectacular" mean to Council?

         ·         Councilor Frantz - Council is looking for more assurances and how the product is situated on the site.  This might mean design materials and design elements.  The Community Plan has the quality and goals baked in - "sense of place" comes up.  Cary doesn't get the recognition through low quality - need to assure fit & quality and something that stands the test of time.  Someplace that "you and your family would want to live." 

Transportation Bond & Focus on the Urban Density?

         ·         Russ Overton - Transportation and multi-modal plan and cap facility plan are out there.  Outside of Maynard loop needs improvements.

         ·         Jerry Jensen - Cary is still going to be a context driven community that serves the bicycle and pedestrian community as well as autos.  In more dense areas the idea of pedestrian walkability is important - so focusing on how to do that in the Cary's ordinance framework is needed.  Wake County sales tax produces $90MM in revenue.  Cary would be remiss if they didn't leverage the funding for large transit and land development projects.  Garner/Cary interaction, Raleigh/Cary interaction - commuter rail and redevelopment with density - the new Community Plan addresses a lot of this already in these Transit Oriented corridors.  Another game changer for Cary - the way the State DOT prioritizes projects in urban areas.  These areas are starting to get funding to get congestion relief.  Cary is gaining momentum in getting funding.  Another game changer, the turnpike around the southern side of Cary.  This allows mobility in the area/triangle.  Cary is now starting to get revenue and we're leveraging to get better projects.  It's done right in Cary and Jerry gives praise to the development community to help fund this.

TCC "in the KNOW" May 2017 Issue

May 2017 Updates

State:

  • Two bills that proposed to strip North Carolina counties and municipalities of their authority to impose impact and other regulatory fees on new construction, House Bills 406 and 436 passed the House ahead of the upcoming crossover deadline.  Bills that have not passed from one chamber to the other by the self-imposed deadline, are effectively dead for the remainder of the legislative session.  The bills will now move to the Senate.  There is no timeline for when a vote could be held in that chamber.  There is also no indication of whether Gov. Cooper would veto either bill.
  • The $22.9 billion budget for North Carolina state government for the 2017-18 fiscal year was tentatively approved the state Senate.   The two-year budget bill also covers the 2018-19 fiscal year, but those provisions can be altered by the General Assembly when it meets next year.
    • Highlights:
      • Reduce individual income tax rate from 5.499 percent to 5.35 percent in 2018.
      • Increase standard deductions for individual income tax filers.
      • Lower corporate income tax rate from 3 percent to 2.75 percent in 2018 and 2.5 percent in 2019.
      • Overhauls and reduces business franchise tax, creating flat $200 tax on first $1 million of a business' net worth.

Regional:

  • Swiss-based Credit Suisse will invest $70.5 million to expand its operations in Research Triangle Park.  The company plans to create 1,200 new jobs during the next several years.
  • The Orange County Board of Commissioners approved the Orange County Transit Plan at a recent work session.  The 5-2 vote will allow the proposed Durham-Orange Light Rail Transit (DOLRT) project to move forward.  The board also approved the Durham-Orange Light Rail Cost Sharing Agreement, which calls for Durham to pay 81.5 percent of the local construction costs and Orange to pay 16.5 percent.  The remaining 2 percent will be funded by a community collaborative.

Orange County:

  • The Orange County County-wide revaluation of real property will go into effect for fiscal 2018 tax year.  Individual taxpayers will see their tax bill change depending on the change in the valuation of their property.

Wake County:

  • The county manager’s Fiscal Year 2018 budget totals $1.26 billion, an increase of $61.4 million over the FY ‘17 budget.  It would require a 1.45-cent property tax increase for a total proposed rate of 61.5 cents for every $100 of property value.
  • In a unanimous vote at its regular meeting on Monday, May 1, the Wake County Board of Commissioners adopted the 2017 Wake County Greenway System Plan and the 2017 Wake County Park Facility Master Plan.   The development of the Greenway System Plan began in the fall of 2015.  The vision for the plan is to create a connected and comprehensive system of greenway trails that will enhance quality of life throughout the county.  The master plan updates and continues the vision from the county’s 2008 Comprehensive Parks and Recreation Master Plan.  The 2017 plan evaluates how each of the county’s nine park facilities can better help residents and visitors enjoy the county’s natural and cultural resources.

Apex:

  • The town held a public hearing on why and how it wants to widen a section of N.C. Highway 55 in the town.  The highway is often congested, but engineers hope a plan to widen it between U.S. Highway 1 and Olive Chapel Road could ease some travel headaches for residents.  Construction most likely won’t begin until 2021.
  • Lennar Carolinas has acquired a 225-acre family-owned farm near Apex for $26 million, on which it plans to build an agrihood community.  The upcoming Smith Farms community will contain 560 new homes at full build-out, which will range in price from the $300,000s to the $600,000s.  A portion of the property will be set aside as a working farm, with raised beds available for lease to farmers and community gardens for residents.
  • No change in the current tax rate of $0.38 is recommended for FY 2017-18.  A small increase is proposed for yard waste, recycling, and trash collection.  There are also some modest changes in development related fees. 

Cary:

  • The town’s planning board sided with neighbors last month when it voted 5-3 to not recommend approval of the West Cary Habitat for Humanity project.  The Cary Town Council is set to vote on the plan later this spring.  Habitat’s original proposal called for 23 attached homes, but the group lowered the number to 15, and then to nine single family homes, after hearing concerns from neighbors.  The nine homes would be detached single-family dwellings.
  • Second Phase of Downtown Park Discussion Take-a-ways:
    • With the approval of the 2012 community bonds, a master plan for the downtown park was completed.
    • The downtown plan called for a 7 acre signature park.
    • Phase 1 of the park was designated for a town square, a central fountain, outdoor performance space, open lawn, and side garden areas.
    • Adjacent to the southern edge of the park will be the future Cary Regional Library and parking deck.
    • In 2016 council approved the concept for the library and parking deck which will include an art wall that will face the next phase of the park.
    • The library and parking deck are about 65% complete in design.
    • Council recently held a work session to approve a process to move ahead with an update to the downtown park master plan.
    • Staff met over 6 weeks to discuss ideas and research nationally-recognized parks.  They presented their findings to council at a work session.
    • The team concluded that when the downtown park is completed it has the potential to be a defining civic space for Cary.
    • To achieve this goal, the planning process must thoughtfully consider the relationship between the park elements and the surrounding development (existing and future).
    • A nationally-recognized firm will be selected to oversee the planning of the update to the Downtown Park Master Plan.
    • Council approved staff recommendations of several design firms who have created award-winning parks and public spaces in cities across the United States.
  • March Development Report:
    • Year to date square footage approved for office is 43,024 and for commercial is 148,248.
    • Year to date types of approved housing include no multi-family, 229 single family, and 201 townhomes.
    • 94 single family permits were issued in March.
    • The average single family dwelling in March was 3891 square feet compared to 4052 square feet in March of 2013.
    • Cary had 9.7% of the single family permits in Wake County.  This was 5th behind Raleigh, Fuquay Varina, Apex, and Wake Forest.
  • IKEA has announced that they are seeking to build its second store in North Carolina on 15 acres that was once occupied by Sears and Macy’s at the Cary Towne Center.  The project has to undergo a rezoning and then site plans in order to get approvals to construct.  The store isn’t anticipated to open until 2020.  This is a vital part of the Eastern Gateway to Cary to redevelop the area around Cary Towne Center.
  • Wegman’s has also indicated a desire to be part of the property north of the Cary Towne Center as part of a mixed use development that will also bring other businesses and retailers to make Cary’s Eastern Gateway a vibrant and walkable destination off of Interstate 40. 

Chapel Hill:

  • The Council will continue a public hearing, originally held April 17, for a Zoning Atlas Amendment from an applicant interested in rezoning about 13,000 sq. ft. of land at 302-304 Ransom St. and 301 McCauley St.  The rezoning would allow the applicant to subdivide the property into two lots.  Upon closing the public hearing, the Council will consider approving the zoning atlas amendment.
  • The Council will consider adopting the West Rosemary Street Development Guide as a component of the Town’s comprehensive plan.  The guide is a vision for future development along the West Rosemary Street corridor that is consistent with the vision statements of the Northside Neighborhood Conservation District.
  • Several community members joined the call for the town to put more money into affordable housing next year.  The proposed $106.8 million budget includes $5.2 million for affordable housing and the town’s public housing department, which manages 336 apartments.  However, council members, residents and nonprofit providers have said that’s not enough to slow the decline in housing priced for families earning 60 percent or less of the area median income ($43,980 a year for a family of four).
  • The Chapel Hill Town Council currently holds meetings on Mondays and work sessions on Wednesdays.  But the council is now considering changing those days, and moving meetings to Wednesdays.
  • No Reductions or Additions to Core Services; Commitment to Affordable HousingThe Council received Town Manager Roger Stancil’s recommended budget for Fiscal Year 2017-2018.  For the fourth consecutive year, the proposed budget calls for no tax increase, thanks to expected growth in sales tax revenues.  A $6 increase in the annual stormwater fee is included in the recommended budget.  The increase will be used to fund operating costs and to pay for debt service on stormwater general obligation bonds that will be issued to fund priority infrastructure improvement projects including those identified in the Lower Booker Creek Subwatershed Study.

Clayton:

  • Rich Cappola has been hired as the first Town of Clayton Director of Engineering & Inspections.  It’s a new title for a big position, reporting directly to the Town Manager.  Rich will oversee everything that’s built in the Town – from houses, office buildings, grocery stores, water lines, sewer lines, roads and storm drains –projects ranging from the new greenway path beginning at the Clayton Community Center to Novo Nordisk’s $2 billion biopharmaceutical expansion.  His first day was May 30.

Durham (City):

  • A proposed property tax increase in Durham would be used to assist in affordable housing.  City Manager Tom Bonfield proposed a 1.79 cent tax increase for next year’s budget.  This would be roughly $32 more per year for a home valued at $180,000.  The proposed budget adds an extra penny to the city’s dedicated housing fund.  That’s a value of $2.79 million.  After a public hearing on June 5, final budget approval is set for June 19 by the Durham City Council. 
  • The Durham City Council is moving ahead with giving the Durham Housing Authority $4.2 million to buy 20 acres of crumbling foundations for future affordable housing.  The council plans to vote on the grant to Development Ventures Inc., (DVI) a development arm of the Durham Housing Authority, at its June 5 meeting.
  • The Durham City-County Development Services Center (DSC) opened on April 3, as part of ongoing efforts to improve the coordination, predictability, timeliness, and quality of the development review process. The DSC is a “one-stop-shop,” providing permit intake for Planning, Inspections and Public Works, in-person customer service, and quick turn-around for minor planning and building projects.
  • Patrick O. Young, AICP, has been named Director of the Durham City-County Planning Department. Mr. Young joined the department in 2008 as Assistant Director, and led the effort to create the new DSC. Young succeeds Steven Medlin, who retired after 30 years of service to the department. More information on the DSC launch is available here, and the official DSC web site can be found here.

Fuquay-Varina:

  • 2035 Community Vision Land Use Plan - The new plan is necessary to address current and future development trends as well as to manage the physical and fiscal components that form such a plan.  The Board motioned to continue the public hearing and table action until the June 5, 2017 meeting, for further study.
  • Town leaders want to attract a developer to turn select downtown properties into new stores, offices and apartments, while keeping the rustic charm intact.  “We want to bring back what most downtowns were like 50, 60 years ago, with people living above stores on the bottom floor,” said Jim Seymour, Fuquay-Varina’s director of economic development. “We want to have that livable, walkable downtown.”

Garner:

  • The recommended property tax rate for the FY 2017-18 budget remains unchanged at 53.25 cents per $100 of assessed valuation.  The result of the Town’s growth in assessed valuation at this same property tax rate will provide an additional $566,538 of revenue over the adopted FY 2016-17 budget.
  • Officials from Wake County and the Town of Garner on May 19th encouraged landlords and community organizations to assist residents of an apartment complex in Garner who are in search of affordable housing after receiving notices that they may face eviction.  The owner of Forest Hills Apartments plans to renovate the property and will not accept any form of housing assistance payments when it reopens.  Individuals and families in all 136 apartments must move out by June 15.  Landlords interested in accepting tenants with rental assistance vouchers and residents who want to help can contact the Wake County Housing Division at 919-856-5689.
  • Garner’s new Town Hall is nearing completion. Learn more about the project by viewing a 3-minute video the Town has produced: http://garnernc.gov/Home/Components/News/News/432/17
  • The national nonprofit KaBOOM! has honored the Town of Garner with a Playful City USA designation for the fourth consecutive year. Garner was one of just 11 cities or towns in the state to earn the recognition this year, joining Raleigh and Durham as the only Triangle municipalities to be named a 2017 Playful City USA. The awards program honors cities and towns across the country for putting the needs of families first so kids can learn, grow and develop important life skills. The communities it honors are transforming ordinary places into playful spaces and using play as a solution to the challenges facing their residents.

Holly Springs:

  • The Planning and Zoning Department is accepting applications to fill a vacancy on the Board of Adjustment with someone who lives beyond town limits, but within Holly Springs’ planning jurisdiction.  The deadline to apply is Monday, June 5 for the extraterritorial jurisdiction (ETJ) regular member’s seat.
  • The FY 2017-18 proposed budget keeps the tax rate at $0.4325 per $100 valuation.  There is no increase to the water and sewer monthly access fees in the budget.  There is a recommended increase of 2% in the actual utility user rates charged to citizens and Holly Springs businesses/industries.  This proposed fee increase reflects an increase in water costs to the Town of Holly Springs that is being charged by Harnett County.

Raleigh:

  • The FY 2017-18 budget proposal includes a property tax rate increase from 41.8 to 42.5 cents per $100 valuation. If approved, the 0.7-cent increase would generate an additional $4.1 million per year.  Raleigh’s median taxable value for a home is $195,154.  The proposed increase would cost the owner of a median value home an additional $13.68 in City property taxes per year.  The proposed budget also includes increasing the monthly water and sewer bill by 3 percent to support the Public Utilities Department’s efforts to maintain and expand infrastructure as Raleigh grows.  In order to support the Solid Waste Service Department’s improvements and meet the City’s cost recovery goal, the proposed budget includes a 75-cent increase in the monthly residential solid waste collection fee.
  • The city is kicking off an update to the Falls of Neuse Area Plan with a public event that took place on May 24.  The meeting included discussion of the scope of the project and gathered input about what makes the area great and what opportunities exist for improvements.  A second opportunity for input will come in June, with a community workshop aimed at exploring different development scenarios.  That meeting will involve a discussion of market, transportation, and land use analysis findings and how those factors relate to the area.  It also will include interactive activities in order to develop a preferred alternative among the potential scenarios.
  • Raleigh is spending more than $400 million over the next 10 years to replace or upgrade the interceptors, or larger pipes, in its sewage collection system, including those along major waterways such as Crabtree Creek, Walnut Creek and the Neuse River.  Larger pipes also will provide the city with more capacity to accommodate a growing population.

Zebulon:

  • Town staff is proposing a long-range plan for Little River Park that flies in the face of the mayor’s desire to pursue federal funding to repair the historic dam that Hurricane Matthew breached.  A general poll on the two options earlier this month showed most commissioners like the master plan idea more than the repair route, which comes with some uncertainty.  The town has 18 months from the date of the October 2016 storm to complete repairs in order to comply with requirements of the Federal Emergency Management Agency, which would reimburse 75 percent of the estimated $350,000 cost.  But it would take about two years to rebuild the dam to its previous state, and the town has yet to take any action.

TCC Coffee Chat with Town of Wake Forest

The Triangle Community Coalition had another successful Coffee Chat with Town of Wake Forest on Wednesday, May 10, 2017!

Joining our members in an informal chat were Mayor Vivian Jones, Commissioner Margaret Stinnett, Commissioner Anne Reeve, Commissioner Jim Thompson, Town Manager Kip Padgett, Communications & Public Affairs Director Bill Crabtree, Downtown Development Director Lisa Hayes, Inspections Director JJ Carr, Parks & Rec Director Ruben Wall, Planning Director Chip Russell, Engineering Director Eric Keravuori and Economic Development Director Jason Cannon.

We provided the Town of Wake Forest with a better perspective of the Triangle Community Coalition's goal to be a proactive partner in growth and land use issues and to work with senior staff and elected officials to develop policies, regulations, and procedures to encourage economic development, produce predictable (yet flexible) outcomes for all stakeholders, and protect the community's interests. 

The Town of Knightdale appreciated the TCC’s ability to offer objective facts and information in efforts to improve public policy debates and create effective working relationships between the business community and local government.  We had some great interaction with the TCC membership in attendance and had opportunity to talk about the following:

Mayor Vivian Jones:

         ·         Wake Forest continues to grow

         ·         Encouraged the development community to come to Wake Forest

Commissioner Anne Reeve:

·        Only complaint she hears about from residents is regarding traffic

Commissioner Margaret Stinnett:

·        Town recently tweaked UDO

·        Development process is streamline to embrace and guide growth


Director of Engineering Eric Keravuori: 

         ·         Capital Projects: street rehabilitation in town

  1. Connection Royal Mill Ave to White Street
  2. Connection of Forest Drive to Southern Wake Forest
  3. Connection of Foundation Drive with Heritage High School
     

Director of Planning Chip Russell:
·        Staffing is an issue at this time

·        Hired Brendie Vega from Town of Apex as new Assistant Planning Director

·        Hired Tim Clark - worked with Wake County

·        Should fill one more position within 30 days

·        New projects have slowed down

·        More non-residential

·        Current population is 42K with a buildout of 70K

·        75k in labor force within a 10 mile radius

·        Merged with Raleigh for water and sewer and has access to 4 million more gallons of water per day

·        Developable/available land – 40% can be developed

 Communications & Public Affairs Director Bill Crabtree:
·        Wake Forest offers many family events

  1. Friday night on White had over 12,000 people attend
  2. Business owners on main street noted new business after event
  3. Working on communication tool to reach out to WF residents

Downtown Development Director Lisa Hayes:
·        White Street Brewery Company noted business is up.  Out of 7000 people, 3500 are new patrons

·        Smaller business are basically the same over the years

·        5 properties out of 200 are available downtown. Only lease from original owners are available to rent

·        Downtown Development- renewed interest of urban living feel

  1. 2 townhome projects to include 60 & 80 units

·        Working on Economic Development

  1. Partner with Arts Groups and Chamber Groups
  2. Large demand for office space

Inspections Director JJ Carr:
 

·        Still doing next day inspections

·        300 new apartments and 600 single family in 2017

·        68 residential units inspected in the month of April

·        Electronic plan review/submittal in the budget for next year

·        WF currently testing the electronic plan review now

·        Schools are currently at adequate levels with 18 public schools, 5 Charter and 4 private

·        WF High Schools are in many areas; Raleigh, Rolesville, Enloe and SE Raleigh

 Parks & Rec Director Ruben Wall:
 

·        Growth in athletic program

·        1000 children in basketball league

·        New projects include a new Pickleball court that will be ready by Memorial Day 2017

·        Taylor Street Park

·        Holding Park – 1st sprayground in Wake Forest

·        Greenway expansions – adding fitness equipment along greenways

·        New community swimming pool will be finished summer 2018

·        Joyner Park - new community center in 2019

·        Hired someone to oversee programs for special needs

Economic Development Director Jason Cannon:
 

·        Retail development – lowest rental vacancy in the Triangle

·        Working closely with business property owners to have properties ready – 140 acres

·        News re: industrial development coming soon

·        Existing industrial park is full except for one building

·        Plans to rejuvenate Technology Park

                                                       
                                                  
  www.tricc.org

TCC "in the KNOW" April 2017

April 2017 Updates

State:

  • A bill that proposed to strip North Carolina counties and municipalities of their authority to impose impact and other regulatory fees on new construction was scaled back by a House committee.  The new version of the bill approved by the House Finance Committee would prevent local governments from raising or enacting new impact fees and orders the Legislative Research Committee to study the issue and propose new legislation next session.
  • Public Input Welcomed as Strategic Plan is Developed.  This May, stakeholders and the public are invited to provide input at community workshops across the state as part of the North Carolina Public Transportation Statewide Strategic Plan. The workshops are free and open to the public.  No registration is necessary to attend.  The N.C. Department of Transportation is developing the Public Transportation Statewide Strategic Plan to improve bus, rail, and paratransit services across the state by better matching transit services to the needs of North Carolinians.  For more information, please visit https://www.ncdot.gov/nctransit/strategicplan/

Regional:

  • The Raleigh-Cary metropolitan area remains one of the fastest growing in the country, according to the latest population estimates from the U.S. Census Bureau.  More than 1.3 million people live in the Raleigh-Cary metro area, defined as Wake, Johnston and Franklin counties, up 2.5 percent in the year ending last June 30.  The Raleigh metro area was the 14th fastest growing in the country and the fastest growing in North Carolina, followed by Charlotte, which grew 2 percent during that time.

Orange County:

  • The draft Orange County transit plan can be found on the Our Transit Future website. GoTriangle is holding public meetings and receiving public comments on the draft plans.
  • There are two pieces of legislation dealing with impact fees currently in the legislature:

·        HB 406 – Repeal of Orange County Impact Fees

·        HB 436 – Repeal Impact Fees Statewide

HB 406 has passed the State & Local Government Committee and House Finance Committee last week.
Orange County was given authorization by the General Assembly to impose school impact fees in 1987. They are one of two counties in the state with this authority. HB 406 will eliminate their ability to impose these fees which have contributed to a decline in housing affordability in a county with a tremendously high tax burden. This bill will also require Orange County to pay for schools as do the other 98 counties in the state.
HB406 passed the House by a vote of 80-40.  In now heads to the Senate.  

HB 436 has passed the State & Local Government Committee and has been referred to a study bill by the House Finance Committee. This means for one year as the act becomes effective; the amount of impact fees imposed by a city or county may not exceed those fees in effect on June 30, 2016, and has tasked the Legislative Research Commission to study impact fees imposed by all cities and counties.

If you would like to contact your representative regarding either of these bills, click HERE to find contact information. For further information, contact Jacob Rogers.

Apex:

  • Lennar Carolinas has formally planted its largest flag yet in southern Wake County – acquiring a 225-acre, family-owned farm west of Apex for its new multi-phased Smith Farms neighborhood community on Olive Chapel Road.  The total price paid for the land assemblage – close to $25.7 million – ranks as one of the largest single-day, land property take-downs in Triangle history.
  • A plan to span railroad tracks in Apex in order to complete a roadway across town is running into community opposition.  Some who live near the proposed project worry about its proximity to homes and its size.  The Apex Peakway was designed years ago as a cross-town passageway, but it stops at a woodline that has railroad tracks on the other side.  The railroad company says it won’t allow a grade crossing for the Peakway expansion.  Apex Mayor Lance Olive says the expansion is needed to improve traffic flow.  The town is now moving ahead with the engineering phase of the project and hopes to also capture some federal funding to help pay for some of the project’s $13 million cost.

Cary:

  • A plan to build more Habitat for Humanity homes in Cary was hobbled when the town's planning board voted not to recommend the land for rezoning.  Habitat for Humanity originally wanted to build 23 townhomes on Trimble Avenue near West Chatham Street. The land there is surrounded by single-family homes.  The full town council will vote to accept or reject that recommendation.
  • Google recently proposed using a micro trenching (MT) installation method for their fiber network. MT involves cutting a four-inch deep trench where the asphalt meets the curb, installing the fiber, then back-filling the cut with a sealant material.  MT significantly increases fiber installation speed and eliminates the need to dig up yards during installation; both items mitigate installation inconveniences on citizens.  Additionally, MT mitigates the chance of utility strikes.  Town staff is working with Google Fiber to determine an area in Cary’s town limits to pilot Google’s micro trenching fiber installation method to see short term impacts, and consider long-term impacts.   
  • Long time planning director Jeff Ulma, retired at the end of March after a 21 year career with the Town. 
    Fire Chief Allan Cain is the Interim Planning Director in addition to his regular duties.
  • Staff’s February Construction Activity report and Planning and Development report included the following interesting notes:
    • The average square footage was 4140 square feet compared to 3903 square feet in 2013.
    • Cary had 14.1% of the county’s single family permits which was 2nd to Raleigh which had 22%.
    • Cary’s permits were up 97% from the previous month
    • 3 development plans were approved and included a storage facility, a church expansion, and a sidewalk connection.

Chapel Hill:

  • The Council approved the acceptance of $446,400 in funds from the NC Department of Transportation for the Fordham Boulevard Sidepath, an important element in the Town’s existing system of off-road, multi-purpose trails.  This project will provide an important link in the pedestrian/bicycle transportation network along Fordham Boulevard.  It will help connect the neighborhoods around Glen Lennox and Meadowmont with the Ephesus-Fordham District.
  • The Council approved a new zoning classification in order to encourage new creative jobs that are a good fit for the community consistent with the Town’s adopted Commercial Development Strategy.  The actions do not rezone any property; instead, they give individual property owners within the designated Millhouse Road area the opportunity to submit a rezoning application for Council review and action.
  • In response to a request from the Town Council, Town Manager Roger Stancil has initiated a process for conducting a major re-write of the Town’s Land Use Management Ordinance (LUMO).  The Council considered resources required to accomplish this task and recommended funding and authorization to proceed. The LUMO is more than 30 years old.  The Town conducted the last major update more than a decade ago.
  • Over the past few months, the Town of Chapel Hill has been listening to the input of town residents on what they want to see in the Rosemary Street developmental plan.  After a period of constructing this developmental guide, the town is ready to propose the final draft guide to the Chapel Hill Town Council.

Durham:

  • The Durham City Council unanimously approved a $100,000 economic development incentive to turn a former automotive service center into an event space for culinary incubator The Cookery and offices for the company that produces the PBS series “A Chef’s Life.”
     

Fuquay-Varina:

  • An open house will be held Wednesday, May 10th from 6:30 p.m. – 8:00 p.m. at Town Hall (401 Old Honeycutt Road) to discuss a mixed use development planned in downtown.  Public is encourage to attend.

Garner:

  • Town Manager Rodney Dickerson has appointed Jeff Triezenberg as the Town of Garner’s planning director effective April 10. Triezenberg had been serving as the Planning Department’s interim director since Dec. 31, following the retirement of longtime director Brad Bass.
  • The Town of Garner is looking for volunteers to become involved in shaping their community.  The Town appoints citizens to serve on a number of advisory boards and commissions. Citizens who serve on these boards and commissions perform a community service using their skills, interests and initiatives to make a difference. Whether interested in community appearance, recreation activities or land-use practices, the Town of Garner has opportunities to volunteer to share time and talents.  Learn more by contacting Town Clerk Stella Gibson at sgibson@garnernc.gov or by calling (919) 773-4406.  Download the application at http://www.garnernc.gov/government/town-boards-committees.
  • Moody’s Investors Service has upgraded to Aa1 from Aa2 the rating on the Town of Garner’s $29.3 million in outstanding general obligation bonds, the company announced on April 17. The upgrade could help the Town obtain better interest rates and terms for future borrowings and bond issuances. “The upgrade to Aa1 is based on the town’s consistently strong financial position bolstered by conservative fiscal policies, a growing tax base benefitting from its proximity to the City of Raleigh, and manageable debt and pension burdens,” Moody’s said. The bond credit rating company cited Garner’s maintenance of a strong liquidity and reserve position and below-average unemployment levels. Moody’s said that Garner “will likely experience continued growth driven by ongoing residential and commercial development.” 

    “The town has maintained consistently high General Fund balance at levels well above the national medians for the Aa1 rating category, averaging 86.5% of revenues during the last five fiscal years (ending June 30, 2016),” Moody’s observed. It also noted that “the town’s management team is solid and has been able to produce consistently balanced operations over a sustained period.”
  • STOCK America, Inc.—a leading producer of sterilization equipment for the food and pharmaceutical industries—opened its new headquarters in Garner’s Greenfield Park North in March. The 17,000-square-foot building brings $2.2 million in new investment as well as 15 jobs to Garner. For more information about Garner economic development, please contact Joseph Stallings at (919) 773-4431 or jstallings@garnernc.gov.

Hillsborough:

  • Significant changes proposed to the Hillsborough Unified Development Ordinance involve defining two types of accessory dwellings — freestanding and in-home units.  Both are secondary dwellings added to the property of a primary dwelling.  Under the ordinance, permit applications for units that meet the requirements could be approved with no public hearing or notice to neighbors. Notice would be given for any application in the Historic District, but discussion of the application would be limited to the appearance of the unit.

Holly Springs:

  • With regional growth in the fast lane, town officials are looking ahead to a possible transportation bond referendum in fall 2018 while trying to accelerate state funding for town priorities.

Raleigh:

  • Upcoming Public Hearings:
    • May 2, 2017, 7:00 p.m.
      • Paving AR 948 - Lake Wheeler Road Pedestrian & Turn Lane Improvements (PW 2012-09)
      • Petition Annexations
        - 9404 Baileywick Road
        - 3701 Gresham Lake Road
      • Z-13-16 - Quail Hollow Drive and St. Albans Drive
      • Z-33-16 - The Lakes Drive
      • Z-41-16 - Everspring Lane
      • Z-43-16 - 8402 Darton Way
      • Z-48-16 - Baileywick Road
      • Z-2-17 - Poole Road and Rawls Drive
    • May 16, 2017, 2:00 p.m.
      • Z-39-16 - Green Acres Lane (Held open from 4/18/17)
    • June 6, 2017, 7:00 p.m.
      • FY 2017-2018 Proposed Budget
      • Z-46-16 - Harden Road

Wendell:

  • The public will take notice that the Wendell Board of Commissioners has scheduled five public hearings on Monday, May 8, 2017 at 7:00 p.m. in the Wendell Town Hall, 15 E Fourth Street, for the following purposes:

o   To consider a zoning map amendment request by Gregory Hopkins to rezone 12.07 acres of land (PIN # 1784019955) from Manufacturing & Industrial (M&I) to Residential Agricultural (RA).  The Wendell Board of Commissioners reserves the right to change the existing zoning classification of the area in question or any part or parts thereof to a more restrictive general zoning classification without the necessity of withdrawal or modification of the petition.

o   To consider a request by Savvy Homes to rezone 20.89 acres of property within the parcel identified by PIN # 1784 49 5755 and addressed as 1505 Marshburn Road from R-40 to a R2 Conditional District to be developed as 23 single family dwellings.

o   To consider a satellite annexation petition for 20.89 acres of property (excluding ROW) located at 1505 Marshburn Road and identified by PIN # 1784495755.

o   To consider text amendments to Chapters 2, 3, 10, and 19 of the UDO as they relate to outdoor and indoor event venues.

o   To consider an amendment to the Town’s Arterial and Collector Street Plan as it relates to Rolesville Road.

TCC Updates:
The TCC organizes monthly Coffee Chats with municipalities across the Triangle. This type of event provides TCC members with the opportunity to have an informal but intimate conversation with elected officials and senior staff
about the area's growth and development. The chats are a TCC Member Only event! 
For more information, please contact Charlene at charlenel@tricc.org
 

Upcoming Coffee Chats:  Save the Dates and All Member Invites will be sent one month prior to the chat!
May 10, 2017 Coffee Chat with Town of Wake Forest
June 27, 2017 Coffee Chat with Town of Cary
August 9, 2017 Coffee Chat with Town of Holly Springs

Upcoming Luncheon Learn Programs in 2017 “

May 19, 2017   Rising in the East: Redevelopment in SE Raleigh and East Durham”

As the Triangle continues to grow, come hear from our expert panelists about emerging opportunities and the vision for these two submarkets.  

Keynote Speakers:
Farad Ali, President & CEO of The Institute
Dan Levine, Director Of Business Development of Self Help
Craig S. Ralph, Vice President, Ralph Urban Development, LLC
Larry Jarvis, Director of Housing & Neighborhoods, City of Raleigh

July (TBD) University Land & Real Estate
October (TBD) Completion of 540
November (TBD) Dix Master Plan

Other Events:
May 11, 2017  "Building Connections at the Top!",  a TCC Spring Networking Event .  

For more information call the TCC Offices at 919 812-7785.  
Thank you to our sponsors for this event:  Sepi Engineering and Google Fiber! 

August 4, 2017 - Campaign Training School: 
The Campaign School is designed to give political candidates and their campaign staff the winning edge!  The full day interactive school is taught by state and national campaign experts who shared their success stories and show the attendees the latest technologies that would benefit their campaigns.  They discuss topics such as; Planning & Budgeting, Elections Laws & Finance Report Deadlines, Fundraising, Voter Lists, Targeting, Identification, Voter Contact, Navigating the New Media & Social Networking.

September 21, 2017 – Political Pig Pickin’ at Angus Barn.  Get ready for an old fashion political rally and candidate forum, with style!  Candidates throughout the region have the opportunity to mingle with hundreds of potential voters. 
 

Sponsorships are available for all events. 
Visit http://www.tricc.org/2017-sponsorship-opportunities/ for more information!

TCC Membership Information:  In 2017 we will act to:

  • Influence public policy
  • Promote responsible stewardship by government
  • Shape public opinion through education
  • Provide solutions for community issues

If you are not a member of the TCC, please join now and commit your resources to help us.  If you are a TCC member, get ready for a year of action.  We cannot hold our peace and leave the future of this region in the hands of those who fail to understand the benefits of growth, the very growth that has made the Triangle the best place to live in the country. 

“Act now or forever hold your peace.”

For more information about TCC membership visit www.tricc.org or call the TCC office at 919 812-7785.

TCC Coffee Chat with the Town of Morrisville Summary

The Triangle Community Coalition  had another successful Coffee Chat with Town of Morrisville on Wednesday, April 5, 2017!

Joining our members in an informal chat were Mayor Mark Stohlman, Councilor Liz Johnson, Councilor T.J. Cawley, Councilor Steve Rao, Town Manager Martha Paige, Town Clerk Erin Hudson, Planning Director Courtney Tanner, Town Engineer Rich Cappola, Long Range Planning Manager Ben Howell and Community Relations Liaison Sarah Baker.

We provided the Town of Morrisville with a better perspective of the Triangle Community Coalition's goal to be a proactive partner in growth and land use issues and to work with senior staff and elected officials to develop policies, regulations, and procedures to encourage economic development, produce predictable (yet flexible) outcomes for all stakeholders, and protect the community's interests. 

The Town of Morrisville appreciated the TCC’s ability to offer objective facts and information in efforts to improve public policy debates and create effective working relationships between the business community and local government.  We had some great interaction with the TCC membership in attendance and had opportunity to talk about the following:

Mayor Stohlman: 

  • Town Center Plan will include a round-a-bout on Town Hall Drive, a new Wake County Library and future farmers market (to open in 2017).
  • Wake Tech Campus is going up near Perimeter Park near Bryan Industrial, and is the first of 5 phases.  After completion, will accommodate 10,000 students.
  • Biggest concerns by Morrisville residents are traffic and amenities:
  • Traffic - Morrisville Carpenter Road widening. Federal funding partnership through LAP program - 70% federal and 30% local. Will include both divided lanes and sidewalks.   Council put $ years ago for design and R/W dedication, and this enabled the LAP funding.
  • The McCrimmon Bypass - 1.5 mile loop that will ultimately connect Evans Road and Aviation Parkway.  This will open up 100's of acreage in mostly industrial and commercial land.  Airport Blvd to Aviation Parkway portion will be starting in fall 2017 and should alleviate traffic off HWY 54.  NCDOT has committed over $100MM over the next 10-15 years in Morrisville.
  • Two new parks in Morrisville – Church Street Park and North West Park.  Crabtree Creek Greenway will eventually connect Davis Drive and Evans Road and will connect to Cary Parkway on the other side of Evans.  The greenway will ultimately connect Morrisville to American Tobacco Trail.
  • Stadelmaier Property on Morrisville-Carpenter Road - 70 single-family units ready to go

Councilor Steve Rao:

  • A bill has been filed in the state legislature which would eliminate local municipalities’ ability to charge impact fees, potentially including Morrisville’s parks fee. 

Councilor Liz Johnson:

  •  Town has great confidence in the large projects.
  •  One thing that needs to be emphasized is the TOD project at McCrimmon Parkway and HWY 54.  McCrimmon will be grade-separated where it crosses over the railroad tracks.  This area offers a great opportunity for dense development due to the proposed commuter rail stop.
  • Town of Morrisville would like to see density (retail/residential) between McCrimmon Parkway and Church Street areas. Small area plan for this region in general terms is still valid.              

    Councilor Michael Schlink:
     
  • Over the last 4 to 5 years the Town has reached out to the Business Community and the Chamber. The Town will look to continue these relationships.
  •  New schools – Parkside Elementary School off Little Drive.  County is looking to find areas to build high and middle schools. Town Code doesn't allow K-12 in the airport overlay (perhaps Town should reconsider this?). Morrisville is the only town in Wake County without a middle or high school.
  • Besides the TOD, the Morrisville Outlet mall near Aviation Parkway is ripe for redevelopment.

Ben Howell, Long Range Planning Manager:

  •  Louis Stevens Dive will be connected from Morrisville to RTP in the next 2 years.
  •  Aviation Parkway will be widened from the railroad crossing at HWY 54 to I-40.  However, it will not be widened where it crosses the railroad tracks due to railroad restrictions.  There is a plan to potentially move the Aviation Parkway/HWY 54 intersection to the east out of the railroad right of way so that it could be widened.
  • Wake Transit Plan: sales tax started last Saturday.  Over the next 3~5 years there will be increased transit service.
  • Transit Oriented Development will allow the highest density.
  • Sidewalk projects will include Church Street, Cary Parkway and Airport Blvd. Airport Blvd funded by NCDOT.  Church Street (DOT) funded in 2 years to fill in gaps.
  • Transportation Plan (2009) version was updated and a new draft in the works to update the cross sections to match up to NCDOT sections which will be built.  Look for draft to be sent out for public input in the next 3 months.

Courtney Tanner, Planning Director:

  •  27,000 population current and grows 10,000 during business hours.
  •   Looking at comp plans that feed into the development regulation.
  •   8 of 10 residents drive to work alone.
  •   Only 8% of Morrisville residents stay in Morrisville to work.
  •   UDO Flexibility - need to add flexibility due to tough/challenging development sites.
  1. Working with consultant to allow flexibility, reuse and redevelopment becomes challenging to adhere to current UDO so this allows flexibility
  2. Going to council later this year
  3. Gives more predictable process
  4. Challenging land takes more staff and $$ resources to develop, so it adds to challenge.  Morrisville has seen this trend over the past few years.
  5.  Morrisville is a target for redevelopment - 1970's projects are ripe for redevelopment given the location
  • What is left for development in Morrisville?  
  1. McCrimmon Bypass opens 100's of acres (industrial/commercial).  There’s already interest in this project
  2. Wake Competition Center (showcase to generate interest)
  3. Single Family is tough; there aren’t any 50-acre tracts left.
     

Morrisville is a solid investment (Mayor Stohlman) – most are winning propositions.

Martha Paige, Town Manager:

  • We want to get some of the visions on the grounds that have been discussed for years.
  • Great focus on customer service.
  • Looking at development community as partners.
  • As the UDO has percolated, and settled in, the Town understands that it needs to be updated to allow more flexibility.

Rich Cappola, Town Engineer:

  • 1,000 total permits (not just new homes) in 2016; similar to 2015 numbers.  Start of 2017 is feeling the same as last year.
  • Permit process changes:
  1. Comments/submittal turned around in 10 business days.
  2. Permit applications where no plans are required, 48 hour turn around
  3. Hired two new building inspectors - multi-trade inspectors
  4. Permit cards are being customized to the project and will only include those inspections which need to be done, instead of a standard permit card listing all possible inspection.

Sara Baker, Community Relations:

  •  Invited TCC members to follow town on Twitter and Facebook.

Sara Gaskill, Morrisville Chamber of Commerce:

  • 2016 – 550 additional jobs in Morrisville.

Jacob Rogers:  Review of TCC Development Services Survey for Town of Morrisville

  • Results – Morrisville scored higher in just about every aspect.  Over the past 3 years, the improvement has been amazing.  Clearly the Town is focused on improving its development services customer experience.

Discussion:

  • Multifamily development concerns by council:
  1. There exist areas in the Town that are currently zoned for multifamily which could provide for 1,000s of units in the future.  
  2. Rezoning properties for that use in light of the existing inventory of property already zoned for multifamily is a tough sell. There was a specific reference to a recent request to rezone commercial/industrial property to multifamily which the Town denied.  
  3. Councilor Schlink would prefer owners over renters.  
  4. Jacob Rogers stated that Morrisville’s central location makes multifamily ideal, especially in light of the lack of developable raw land. 
  5. Town currently is about 50/50 rent/own ratio.  
  6. 27k people in Morrisville, 50k in Apex, 140k in Cary.  
  7. Councilor Rao - by the end of 2019, there will much better infrastructure.  As this improves, the traffic circumstances will abate themselves.  
  8. Councilor Rao suggested that the multifamily impact is more beneficial to the Town.  
  9. Town may have to bring in a consultant to educate on the impacts of multifamily.  
  10. Tom Anhut stated that, traditionally home ownership has been viewed as more beneficial to municipalities, as owners typically care for their properties to a higher level than renters.  However, land scarcity in Morrisville is pushing both home sales prices and rents up, resulting in higher end projects that are maintained at a high level.
  11. Jacob Rogers referenced a study that indicated that the Raleigh market is the #1 market with the greatest shortage of rental units.    

TCC "in the KNOW" March 2017 Issue

March 2017 Updates

State:

  • Regulatory Reform (HB131 (link is external): A bill entitled Regulatory Reform Act of 2016, which seeks to adopt all of the regulatory provisions agreed upon by the House and Senate last year, has passed the Senate Natural and Environmental Resources Committee and the Senate Rules Committee. The bill passed the Senate by a vote of 38-11, mostly along party lines, and now heads to the House.
  • North Carolina is no longer among the states suing the federal government over a series of environmental regulations.  The Clean Power Plan, set up by the Environmental Protection Agency under the Clean Power Act, was designed to reduce carbon dioxide emissions and focused effort on developing alternative energy sources.
  • The North Carolina homeownership rate increased one-half percentage point to 65.7 percent in 2016, according to an analysis of data published by the Census Bureau.  In the past quarter century, only twice – 2005 and 2009 – did the rate increase at a sharper clip, and both of those years were followed by significant declines the following year.

Regional:

  • The Raleigh and overall Triangle retail markets ended 2016 in a very healthy position.  The Triangle retail vacancy rate is currently at 6.09 percent, nearing 10-year lows dating back pre-recession and includes retail absorption nearing 900,000 square feet over the past four quarters.  The region’s diverse economic engine driven by technology, university systems, heath care and Raleigh as a state capital, combined with a relatively low cost of living and temperate climate, continue to push population growth and related retail expansion.  With fierce grocery competition, a natural evolution of inward growth and urbanization and several large mixed-use development projects, the Triangle retail market is thriving.   However, e-commerce, rightsizing and store closures continue to challenge the broader U.S. retail market and the Triangle has not been spared.
    Source: Charlie Coyne, Senior Vice President and Tiffany Barrier, Senior Associate of Retail Services, CBRE | Raleigh. This article originally appeared in the January 2017 issue of Southeast Real Estate Business.
  • As part of a study examining a 27-mile section of N.C. 98, the public is encouraged to share their thoughts and issues on the corridor with county and state planners.  The study – launched by the Capital Area Metropolitan Planning Agency, the Durham-Chapel Hill-Carrboro Metropolitan Planning Organization and the North Carolina Department of Transportation – runs through July 2018.  The three groups will assess current and future roads, bicycle and pedestrian facilities, safety and transit uses on a stretch of N.C. 98 that runs from U.S. 70 in Durham County through Wake County to U.S. 401 in Franklin County.  People can post their comments on traffic, safety or other issues at a specific intersection or piece of the corridor anonymously using an online map found at NC98Corridor.com through April 6.  Some of the questions people are asked to consider when commenting include:  What areas are challenging for you to navigate?  Where do you see major issues?  Do you have any environmental or safety concerns?
  • Orange and Durham County leaders agreed Friday to accelerate efforts to update plans for a 17-mile light rail line that would stretch from UNC Hospitals to NC Central University.  County officials need to meet a new Federal Transit Administration deadline at the end of April. The FTA wants an updated cost estimate and funding strategy for the two-county light rail plan by April 30th. That's more than a month earlier than originally planned.

Wake County:

  • Wake County residents are encouraged to participate in a series of public meetings this month to learn more about the Fiscal Year (July 1, 2017-June 30, 2018) Wake Transit Draft Work Plan. It outlines the improvements, such as expanding bus routes and increasing bus service, proposed in first year of the 10-year plan to enhance Wake County’s transit system.  Residents can comment on the FY 18 Draft Work Plan by visiting waketransit.com or contacting David Powe, GoTriangle Public Outreach Specialist, at 919-485-7522. Printed copies of the draft work plan will be available at all Wake County public libraries (list of library locations).  The public can comment on the draft work plan through April 3, 2017.  The Wake County Transit Plan will be implemented over a 10-year period and includes tripling existing bus service, creating Bus Rapid Transit corridors, and a commuter rail connection between Garner, Raleigh, Cary, RTP and Durham.

Cary:

  • The Town has taken considerable measures to protect water quality and provide relief for flooding.  These measures include innovative ordinances to protect storm buffers and control runoff by development.  They include policies to evaluate citizen requests to reduce flooding and improve drainage.  The Town has completed numerous projects to manage stormwater more effectively and improve streams.  The Town completed a Stormwater Master Plan in 2013 and a Town Center Area Floodplain Study in 2006.  The Town’s stormwater program operates under an NPDES Stormwater permit issued by the state of North Carolina Department of Environmental Quality.  The town has created an index of information that describes these initiatives and actions in more detail to provide a more complete picture of Cary’s approach. 
  • Quarterly Report of Economic Development. Here are a few notable items from that report:
    • Cary’s inventory of land and buildings in key locations is critical to attracting and retaining companies and jobs.  Inventory on both is low.
    • Class A office vacancy has dropped to 7.03% which is low.
    • There is a strong interest in corporate offices looking to locate in downtown.  There are currently 4 active projects with potentially 2,000 employees.
    • Developers are showing strong interest in moving forward with apartments and condos in downtown.
    • Cary was the #1 boomtown in the US out of 572 of the largest municipalities.  The criteria included unemployment rate, GDP growth, and negative migration.
    • Cary was the #6 city where millennials are buying a home.
    • Cary’s Umstead was named to 2017 best hotels list.
    • Cary’s unemployment rate is 3.5% as compared to Wake County at 4%, North Carolina at 4.9%, and the United States at 5.1%.
    • Current potential economic development in the pipeline includes 3,400 jobs and $174 million in capital investment.
  • The Construction and Activity report for the month of January included the following notable items:
    • 83 single family permits were issued which was the most since July of 2016.
    • Cary had 6.9% of the county’s single family permits which was 7th out of the 12 municipalities.
    • The average single family dwelling was 3665 square feet compared to 4101 square feet in January of 2013.

·        LDO Amendments Round 36 and 38 are up for council adoption this month. 

·       Planning Director, Jeff Ulma is retiring from the Town at the end of March. 

Chapel Hill:

  • Recently, a public presentation on guidelines for the redevelopment of West Rosemary Street in Chapel Hill was given by town officials and members of an urban design firm.  “Rosemary Street is seeing development pressure, and it’s creating a tension between increasing market demand for higher-density and larger developments, and a historic African-American neighborhood in the north side,” “Rosemary Street is literally the seam between those pressures.”  A a public hearing on the guidelines will take place in April, with a ratification vote from the Chapel Hill Town Council expected in May.
  • Apply to serve the community by serving on a Town of Chapel Hill advisory board, committee or commission.  The town is currently looking to fill vacancies on all boards and commissions.  For more information on the work of these groups, eligibility requirements, or to complete an application, please visit www.townofchapelhill.org/boards. View a video at https://vimeo.com/157782030.  Apply now at https://chapelhill.granicus.com/boards/forms/146/apply.  Apply by April 3 for assured consideration.

Fuquay-Varina:

  • Fuquay-Varina will receive the $4.5 million it applied for to complete Northwest Judd Parkway after its application scored highest among the 10 Wake County proposals CAMPO reviewed.

Holly Springs:

  • A major new subdivision won zoning approval at the Town Council’s March 7 meeting over the objections of a standing room-only crowd at Town Hall who oppose the project.  The Honeycutt Road neighborhood will be built on either side of its namesake between Cass Holt Road and Piney Grove-Wilbon Road.  It lies on 231 acres bordered by Holly Springs High School to the north and by the site of the unbuilt Buckhorn Creek Elementary School to the west.  The 610 homes to be built by Ohio-based M/I Homes are the result of several months of negotiations between the developer, the town and residents. It was the zoning case’s fourth appearance before the Holly Springs council since Nov. 15.

Morrisville:

  • A plan to widen Morrisville Carpenter Road between Davis Drive and Page Street will proceed on schedule after CAMPO awarded Morrisville $6.3 million in federal grant money to help pay for the project’s construction.
  • Cary has been charging developers a transportation development fee for almost 30 years to augment its roads funding.  Morrisville, a town with traffic problems of its own, recently began to wonder whether it should pursue a similar practice.  But analysis by Morrisville town staff revealed that the fee would net the town less than expected and that it would be prohibitively difficult to implement.  Council members directed the town’s legislative liaisons at the Feb. 28 council meeting to drop the matter.

Raleigh:

  • City Gateway will have an exoskeleton of roof- and wall-mounted photovoltaic panels along with a ground-sourced, geothermal energy storage system.  City Gateway, located at 120 Kindley St., is also being designed as a new home for The Exploris School, a K-8 charter school program seeking to combine its middle school on Hillsborough Street and its elementary school on New Bern Avenue into one building.  Exploris plans to open a campus on the first floor level of the 10-story building, taking about 50,000 square feet that will open up to its own courtyard and play area.
  • The 2017-2018 Annual Action Plan Draft is ready for review! Send feedback on the draft to cd.info@Raleighnc.gov during the 30-day comment until April 17.  A public hearing for the Action Plan will be held April 4 after 7 p.m. in City Council Chambers where citizens can also contribute feedback in front of City Council.  Action Plan includes projected funding amounts and efforts for:
    • Increasing Affordable Housing
    • Improving Neighborhoods
    • Re-housing people who are homeless.

TCC Updates:

The TCC organizes monthly Coffee Chats with municipalities across the Triangle. This type of event provides TCC members with the opportunity to have an informal but intimate conversation with elected officials and senior staff
about the area's growth and development. The chats are a TCC Member Only event! 
For more information, please contact Charlene at charlenel@tricc.org
 

Upcoming Coffee Chats:  Save the Dates and All Member Invites will be sent one month prior to the chat!
April 5, 2017 Coffee Chat with Town of Morrisville
May 10, 2017 Coffee Chat with Town of Wake Forest
June 27, 2017 Coffee Chat with Town of Cary
August 9, 2017 Coffee Chat with Town of Holly Springs

Upcoming Luncheon Learn Programs in 2017

March 30, 2017 -Go Big and Go Home! The Triangle's Next New Community - Chatham Park!"

Come hear Preston Development outline their plans for what will be the largest development project in the
history of North Carolina!  Keynote Speakers: Dr. Mike Walden, Vanessa Jenkins, Chuck Smith & Robin Rose.

May (TBD) Southeast Raleigh/East Durham Development
July (TBD) University Land & Real Estate
October (TBD) Completion of 540
November (TBD) Dix Master Plan

Other Events:

August 4, 2017 - Campaign Training School: 
The Campaign School is designed to give political candidates and their campaign staff the winning edge!  The full day interactive school is taught by state and national campaign experts who shared their success stories and show the attendees the latest technologies that would benefit their campaigns.  They discuss topics such as; Planning & Budgeting, Elections Laws & Finance Report Deadlines, Fundraising, Voter Lists, Targeting, Identification, Voter Contact, Navigating the New Media & Social Networking.

September 21, 2017 – Political Pig Pickin’ at Angus Barn.  Get ready for an old fashion political rally and candidate forum, with style!  Candidates throughout the region have the opportunity to mingle with hundreds of potential voters. 

Sponsorships are available for all events. 
Visit http://www.tricc.org/2017-sponsorship-opportunities/ for more information!

TCC Membership Information
In 2017 we will act to:

  • Influence public policy
  • Promote responsible stewardship by government
  • Shape public opinion through education
  • Provide solutions for community issues

If you are not a member of the TCC, please join now and commit your resources to help us.  If you are a TCC member, get ready for a year of action.  We cannot hold our peace and leave the future of this region in the hands of those who fail to understand the benefits of growth, the very growth that has made the Triangle the best place to live in the country. 

“Act now or forever hold your peace.”

For more information about TCC membership visit www.tricc.org or call the TCC office at 919 812-7785

TCC Coffee Chat with Duke Energy Summary

Triangle Community Coalition had another successful Coffee Chat with Duke Energy Management Team on March 8, 2017.

Joining our members in an informal chat were Marty Clayton, Adrianne Elder, Jonathan Elkins, Kim Ellis, Indira Everett, Heather Minter, Carmen Prevette, Tracy Woolsey and Pete Wehr.

We provided the Duke Energy team with a better perspective of the Triangle Community Coalition's goal to be a proactive partner in growth and land use issues and to work with senior staff and elected officials to develop policies, regulations, and procedures to encourage economic development, produce predictable (yet flexible) outcomes for all stakeholders, and protect the community's interests.

Duke Energy Management Team appreciated the TCC’s ability to offer objective facts and information in efforts to improve public policy debates and create effective working relationships between the business community and local government.  We had some great interaction with the TCC membership in attendance and had opportunity to talk about the following:

Action Items agreed by everyone:

  •   Duke Energy to investigate creating a designated customer service person for    developers. Someone to answer questions and respond to project engineers and builders.
  •   Duke Energy to provide point of contact information for Duke Energy leadership.
  •   Future Coffee Chat with Duke Energy, Google Fiber, Century Link, Charter, AT&T and Ting to    discuss joint trench and other mutually beneficial actions.
  •  Improved system to verify construction readiness and have more predictability with the process.

Discussion:

  •   Duke Energy added staff and crews since last year
  •   Ran 90% on time to hit target date to completion
  •   Joint Trenching:
    ·        Resource constraints—other utilities and demands

·        Adds safety risk

·        Crews need to be certified in both gas and electric

·        Include development community in communication/design process

·        Duke Energy indicated that it was their understanding that Time Warner had opted out of joint trenching  
 

  •   Exchange of Duke design prints in larger scale to be shared with development community:

·        Dropbox issues

·        Duke Energy to consider creating their own share site

·        Other utilities will leave a 30x46 at site
 

  •  Need for better direct contact with Duke Energy senior department staff that have an better understanding of the development community issues
     
  •   Future Growth:

·        How to get in front of growth

·        Duke Energy currently works on a 1 year forecast of future growth to include
development, road projects and cable projects

·        Would like to forecast 3-5 years out

·        Expects to double their workforce the next few years in grid and transmission areas

·        Still putting infrastructure in the same way as they did 20 years ago

  •   Joe Angell asked about cyber security of Duke Energy systems. 
      Duke Energy replied they had no information at this time.
  •   Duke Energy meets with municipalities on a regular basis
  •   TCC asked Duke Energy for better guidelines for the startup of a development.  
      Designer plans match up with development design.  What does Duke Energy need as a developer starts the process?  Need for a checklist (cheat sheet)
  •   Duke Energy noted they need 4-6 week lead time for preliminary work/ infrastructure.
  •   Delays happened because site is not ready
  •   Design work – 4 weeks to finish process
  •   Duke Energy needs to document consistency problems to better address the issues.  Staff will follow up with this concern.

Jim Anthony, Collier International inquired about Duke Energy solar energy process.  Duke Energy has a solar energy team working to prepare for future programs.

Contact Information for the Management Team of Duke Energy:

Marty Clayton, District Manager, Raleigh                               919 546-3311      marty.clayton@duke-energy.com

Jonathan Elkins, Director Distribution Design Eng.                   919 481-6121            jonathan.elkins@duke.energy.com

Indira Everett, District Manager, Durham                              919 687-3200      indira.everett@duke-energy.com

Heather Minter, General Manager, Customer Care Group         919 977-2001      heather.minter@duke-energy.com

Tracy Woolsey, Manager Distribution Resource Planning          919 546 5878      tracy.woolsey@duke-energy.com

If you are interested in participating in future meetings with Duke Energy or future Coffee Chats, watch for notices or contact the TCC offices at 919 812-7785 or Charlene Logan at charlenel@tricc.org to reserve your spot! 

These programs are a great way for you, as an exclusive benefit as a TCC member, to become active and help the TCC strengthen our relationships with local jurisdictions throughout the Triangle.  

TCC Coffee Chat with Duke Energy Summary

 

 

TCC "in the KNOW" February 2017

TCC 'in the KNOW"

February 2017 Updates

Statewide:

  • Gov. Cooper’s ‘shovel-ready’ infrastructure priorities:
    • Completing I-295 Fayetteville outer loop in Cumberland and Robeson Counties: $280 million
    • Completing the Winston-Salem northern beltway: $285 million
    • Improving the I-40 and I-77 interchange in Iredell County: $204 million
    • Widening 22.2 miles of I-26 in Buncombe and Henderson counties: $257 million
    • Improving I-95 Northampton, Halifax, Nash, Johnston, Harnett, Cumberland and Robeson counties: $215 million
    • Completing the Durham-Orange light rail transit project led by the GoTriangle transit agency: $1.5 billion
    • Widening U.S. 74 in Mecklenburg County: $426 million
    • Widening I-485 in Mecklenburg County: $214 million.

Regional:

  • A judge ruled in favor of Fayetteville and other communities downstream of Jordan Lake who said their water supplies were threatened by a state commission’s decision to allow three Wake towns to divert water from the Cape Fear River Basin.  In March 2015, the state’s Environmental Management Commission allowed Cary, Apex and Morrisville to modify a 2001 agreement, known as an inter-basin transfer that allowed those towns to return 24 million gallons of Cape Fear River Basin water per day to the Neuse River Basin. Jordan Lake, a major source of drinking water, lies in the Cape Fear River Basin.

Chatham County:

  • What should Chatham County look like over the next 25 to 30 years and how do we get there?
    Residents have a chance to weigh in and to provide input during the final stages of developing a Countywide Comprehensive Plan. When completed and adopted, the county’s Comprehensive Plan will help guide recommendations for future policies and funding decisions over the next 25 to 30 years.

Chatham County wants to hear from residents and get input on draft recommendations in the Comprehensive Plan. All draft plan materials and a public survey, open until March 24, 2017, are posted onlinewww.planchatham.com.

“We ask that people share this link with other residents so that we hear from as many people as possible,” said Planning Director Jason Sullivan.  Visit these websites to learn more about the Chatham County Comprehensive Plan: www.chathamnc.org/comprehensiveplan 

Orange County:

  • The Orange County Board of Commissioners heard a proposal for a bus rapid transit system that would provide service to residents of Carrboro and Chapel Hill.  The proposal was pitched by Brian Litchfield, the director of Chapel Hill Transit, who explained that the service corridor under consideration is intended to benefit commuters. “It starts at the existing Eubanks park-and-ride and then moves down Martin Luther King [Junior] Boulevard through downtown Chapel Hill […] out to the Southern Village park-and-ride.”  Three options were presented to commissioners by Litchfield, with each option incorporating a special lane that would keep buses separate from regular traffic flows.  “We’re talking about dedicated lanes on [option one] and [option two], and then [option three] would be the dedicated center lane.”  The dedicated lanes would enable buses to make more trips over an anticipated seven-day operating schedule that Litchfield briefed to commissioners. “5:00 AM to 11:00 PM [on weekdays and] 8:00 AM to 11:00 PM [on weekends],” he cited.  “Frequency that’s anticipated is seven-and-a-half minutes during the day.”  A study on the system was initiated in 2014 by Chapel Hill Transit that put the estimated number of passengers over the course of 60 hours at over 20,000.

    Wake County:
  • The Wake County 2018 Transit Work Plan is available for public comment.  Last November, voters approved a referendum to fund the robust ten-year Wake County Transit Plan, and we’re starting to see the first elements of the plan unfold,” said GoTriangle Board Chair Jennifer Robinson from Cary.  GoTriangle, along with the Capital Area Metropolitan Planning Organization (CAMPO), Wake County, and all twelve municipalities in Wake County, are ready to hear from the public on the projects proposed for next year. 
    The public is invited to make comments on the Draft Work Plan between February 20, 2017 and April 3, 2017.
    For more informationor to comment on the plan, visit http://www.waketransit.com/fy18-work-plan/

Apex:

  • A proposed neighborhood in a quickly developing area of Apex won its rezoning case Feb. 7, in a 3-2 vote after the developers agreed to larger lot sizes and expedited roadwork.  The case was continued following its initial public hearing in January, when council members told developers they’d like to see bigger home lots and guaranteed roadway connectivity.  In response, Charlotte-based builder Crescent Homes reduced its proposal for 220 homes on the 87-acre Pricewood assemblage to 200 homes.  The land includes seven rural parcels surrounding Pricewood Lane, off Olive Chapel Road.

Cary:

  • Utilities Update Report is noteworthy because it contains all of the 2016 operating data, which has been compared against previous years in many key performance areas.  This report contains lots of rich information, but a few key takeaways are below:
    • Water treatment plant production increased from 18.1 million gallons per day (MGD) in 2015 to 18.3 MGD in 2016.
    • Water plant staff is beginning to detect an increase in taste and odor compounds in Jordan Lake that typically increase early each year.  They are monitoring this closely and effectively removing the taste
      and odor compounds from finished water production.
    • Wastewater flows to Cary’s three wastewater treatment facilities increased from 17.04 MGD in 2015 to 17.33 MDG in 2016.  North Cary and South Cary average daily flows were essentially unchanged from 2015 to 2016 with Western Wake Regional increasing from 4.61 MGD to 4.89 MGD. All three wastewater treatment facilities are maintaining exceptional treatment performance with 96% nitrogen removal and 92% or greater phosphorus removal.
    • Sanitary sewer overflows for 2016 were on par with previous years.
    • Annual biosolids production is at 5,189 dry tons for 2016, which is an increase of 214 dry tons processed in 2015.
  • The required neighborhood meeting for the rezoning request for a portion of the Cary Towne Center Mall is set
    for March 1, and nearby property owners are receiving notification letters this week.
  • Cary Stats:
    • Nearly 50% of all buildings and homes in Cary were built from 1980 – 1999.
    • 14% were built prior to 1980.  (this means that 36% were built from 2000 – present – correct?)
    • 12% of homes in Cary are rental.
    • 22% of homes inside the Maynard Loop are rental. 
  • Karen Mills, Cary’s finance director, said the bonds will be used to pay for an expansion of the Cary/Apex water treatment facility, upgrading water lines and sewage plumbing and more.  Based on her report, Mills said the town would pay off the debt from the bonds in roughly 25 years, comparing its structure to a mortgage payment.
  • The Cary Town Council had previously approved widening Green Level West Road from Highway 55 to the I-540 interchange and voted to approve the bid award for $3.6 million. 

Chapel Hill:

  • Transit consultants are hosting six public meetings in Chapel Hill starting the last week of February to discuss possible development around stations along the proposed Durham-Orange Light Rail Transit line, which would run along U.S. 15-501.  The transit agency and Gateway Planning will present an overview, according to GoTriangle Planning Manager Patrick McDonough.  He said they want to hear residents' concerns and aspirations for the areas surrounding the light rail line.
  • The Chapel Hill Town Council met to consider a proposal to redevelop the Lincoln Center, an administrative campus under the jurisdiction of Chapel Hill-Carrboro City Schools.  The campus was known as Lincoln High School in 1950 when it became an all-black educational institution, but national desegregation efforts led to its repurposing in 1966.  The proposal aims to expand the campus by erecting a preschool center, classrooms for technical education and museum space for artifacts from Lincoln High School.
  • The Chapel Hill Town Council met on January 18 to consider the establishment of a task force with a purpose of evaluating properties owned by the municipal government.  Pam Hemminger, the mayor of Chapel Hill, explained that the proposed task force would reconcile the potential use of those properties with the needs of the town.
  • Elkins Hill neighborhood residents and the general public are invited to share interests and ideas about a possible joint project between UNC-Chapel Hill and the Town of Chapel Hill.  In this early stage of discussions, the project being considered is a new municipal services facility on University-owned property located on the south side of Estes Drive between Airport Drive and Seawell School Road.  The public information session is scheduled at 5:30 p.m. Monday, March 6, in the Magnolia Meeting Room of the Giles F. Horney Building, 103 Airport Drive.

Durham (City):

  • The Durham Planning Commission late Tuesday voted against supporting a north Durham rezoning request that would allow for a mixed-use development with a Publix grocery store.  The 11-2 vote against recommending the change came after a more than two-hour public hearing and an hour-long discussion among the Planning Commission.  The advisory board’s recommendation now goes to City Council, which will make the final decision on the rezoning.
  • Property adjacent to the Durham Station Transportation Center may be tricky to develop, but Durham City Council members are considering a pre-development agreement with a joint venture group take on the challenge.  The 1.9-acre site is located at Jackson and Pettigrew streets, near the 400 block of Willard Street and 100-200 blocks of Jackson Street.  During the council’s work session, representatives of a joint venture between Durham-based
    Self-Help Ventures Fund and Raleigh-based affordable housing developer DHIC discussed their interest in a mixed-use and affordable housing project at the “L-shaped” property.  The architect of record for the project would be Raleigh-based Cline Design Associates.  The council opted to pursue a mixed-use, mixed-income development alternative anchored by multi-family residential rental units and private development at the site, following a September 2015 Department of Economic and Workforce Development presentation.

Fuquay-Varina:

  • An overhaul of Fuquay-Varina’s transportation plan has emphasized the need to build two new roads to bypass N.C. 55 and U.S. 401’s routes through the town. Kimley-Horn, the civil engineering consultancy, was paid to draft the document.  The firm presented research backing that recommendation at a meeting of the town’s transportation plan steering committee Feb. 2.  Their preliminary recommendations suggest the roads – both four lanes wide with a median in the middle – will be necessary to maintaining acceptable traffic flow in and around town by 2040.
  • The town’s downtown parking supply is meeting current demand, but relies heavily on unofficial dirt, gravel and grass lots, according to a study presented Tuesday to the Board of Commissioners.  The $55,000 study was commissioned last August as part of a broader effort by Fuquay-Varina to prepare its downtown for anticipated growth and redevelopment.  A final report is expected in March.

Hillsborough:

  • Town officials in Hillsborough announced plans to replace a rock-laden stormwater drainage swale at Cates Creek Park with a plant-lined rain garden.  According to the announcement, the purpose of the rain garden is to “act as a bioretention area by allowing collected [stormwater] runoff to soak into the ground.” 

Holly Springs:

Morrisville:

  • The Town Council voted 6-1 to finalize district numbers for recently redrawn council districts, despite one council member’s continued protests about how the new map will affect residents.  The council voted to switch the numbers of three districts because a new map approved in the fall left District 1, the town’s northwest region, without an elected representative until the 2019 election.

Raleigh:

  • Raleigh is one of the fastest growing cities in the United States and in order to keep up with the pace, the city and the state are working together to build a new transportation hub.  City officials say construction is about 50 percent complete.  Located in the Warehouse District on the west side of downtown Raleigh, Union Station is expected to be one of the biggest catalysts for urban growth the city has ever seen.  The transit hub will provide service for Amtrak and regional buses.
  • The City of Raleigh has scheduled a public meeting on proposed pedestrian and transit improvements on New Bern Avenue between Tarboro Road and Sunnybrook Road.  The public meeting was held on Wednesday, Feb. 22. The improvements proposed for New Bern Avenue include sidewalks, curbs and gutters, a multi-use path, upgraded transit stops, LED street lighting, pedestrian/traffic signal modifications, streetscape, and landscaping.
  • Raleigh City Council adopted the Southern Gateway Corridor Study Report and its attendant Comprehensive Plan amendments.  The plan outlines a vision for major infrastructure investments that could transform Raleigh’s Southern Gateway Corridor into a more vibrant, revitalized area.  The gateway covers South Saunders Street and South Wilmington Street.  For more information, please visit our Southern Gateway Corridor Study page or call the City’s Urban Design Center at 919-996-4642.
  • At its meeting on February 21, the City Council approved the Development Services Fee Study recommendations which will change those City fees charged by the DS department, effective July 1, 2017.  There was discussion about grandfathering projects which will have already been submitted for Preliminary Plan Approval by that date.  As an example of the fee changes, the building permit for a 2,500 sq ft single family home will increase by approximately 60%.
     
  • Public Hearing schedule:
    • March 7, 2017, 7:00 p.m.
      • Public Nuisance Appeal - Weeks & Sherron, LLC - Various Properties
      • Petition Annexations
        - 2400 Gresham Lake Road
        - 7926 Ray Road
      • Z-24-16 - Litchford Road (Held open from 2/7/17)
      • Z-37-16 - ACC Boulevard
    • March 21, 2017, 2:00 p.m.
      • Raleigh ETJ - Relinquishment of 15 Acres to Wake County - Long/Williams Property (Held open from 2/7/17)
      • TC-1-17 - Historic Districts Development Guidelines (Held open from 2/7/17)

o   June 6, 2017, 7:00 p.m.

§  FY 2017-2018 Proposed Budget

TCC Updates:

The TCC organizes monthly Coffee Chats with municipalities across the Triangle. This type of event provides TCC members with the opportunity to have an informal but intimate conversation with elected officials and senior staff
about the area's growth and development. The chats are a TCC Member Only event! 
For more information, please contact Charlene at charlenel@tricc.org
 

Upcoming Coffee Chats:  Save the Dates and All Member Invites will be sent one month prior to the chat!
April 5, 2017 Coffee Chat with Town of Morrisville
May 10, 2017 Coffee Chat with Town of Wake Forest
June 27, 2017 Coffee Chat with Town of Cary
August 9, 2017 Coffee Chat with Town of Holly Springs

Upcoming Luncheon Learn Programs in 2017

March 30, 2017 -Go Big and Go Home! The Triangle's Next New Community - Chatham Park!"

Come hear Preston Development outline their plans for what will be the largest development project in the
history of North Carolina!  Keynote Speakers: Vanessa Jenkins, Chuck Smith & Robin Rose.

Registration is available on-line at http://www.tricc.org/2017-luncheon-learns/

May (TBD) Southeast Raleigh/East Durham Development

July (TBD) University Land & Real Estate

October (TBD) Completion of 540

November (TBD) Dix Master Plan

Other Events:
 

August 4, 2017 - Campaign Training School:  
The Campaign School is designed to give political candidates and their campaign staff the winning edge!  The full day interactive school is taught by state and national campaign experts who shared their success stories and show the attendees the latest technologies that would benefit their campaigns.  They discuss topics such as; Planning & Budgeting, Elections Laws & Finance Report Deadlines, Fundraising, Voter Lists, Targeting, Identification, Voter Contact, Navigating the New Media & Social Networking.

September 21, 2017 – Political Pig Pickin’ at Angus Barn.  Get ready for an old fashion political rally and candidate forum, with style!  Candidates throughout the region have the opportunity to mingle with hundreds of potential voters. 
 

Sponsorships are available for all events. 
Visit http://www.tricc.org/2017-sponsorship-opportunities/ for more information!

TCC Membership Information
In 2017 we will act to:

  • Influence public policy
  • Promote responsible stewardship by government
  • Shape public opinion through education
  • Provide solutions for community issues

If you are not a member of the TCC, please join now and commit your resources to help us.  If you are a TCC member, get ready for a year of action.  We cannot hold our peace and leave the future of this region in the hands of those who fail to understand the benefits of growth, the very growth that has made the Triangle the best place to live in the country. 

“Act now or forever hold your peace.”

For more information about TCC membership visit www.tricc.org or call the TCC office at 919 812-7785

TCC "in the KNOW" January 2017

January 2017 Updates
 

TCC "in the KNOW"

Nationwide:

  • The Department of Housing and Urban Development said Friday that the reduction to the annual mortgage insurance premiums borrowers pay when taking out government-backed home loans has been “suspended indefinitely”.

Statewide:
 

  • Gov Roy Cooper said North Carolinians are "already paying for" Medicaid expansion, even though the state hasn’t expanded Medicaid. He was arguing for the state to go ahead and accept the expansion. He’s right that North Carolinians are already paying into the program, via federal taxes. Yet what he doesn’t mention is that the state government currently pays nothing into the program but would have to pay hundreds of millions of dollars per year if it did accept the expansion. Doing so would also increase the federal tax burden on people all over the country, including in North Carolina. Source: Politifact

Regional:

  • The 540 Loop – a project the N.C. Department of Transportation has been mulling for more than a decade – has at least three years to go before its southern section can move forward, according to a new project timeline. NCDOT expects the Complete 540 project to cost about $2.2 billion.
  • New home stats (year over year) – up 12.6% for Starts (11,102) and 12% for Closings (10,487)   Lot deliveries were up 11.5% to 9,910.

Apex:

  • A developer proposing a 220-home subdivision for an area where two large-scale subdivisions already are in the works – will need to revise its plan before the Town Council approves it. Crescent Communities, a Charlotte-based builder, has bought several properties along Pricewood Lane, totaling about 87 acres, and has applied to rezone the land for medium-density, single-family housing. But a majority of Apex’s council members – Bill Jensen, Wesley Moyer and Mayor pro tem Nicole Dozier – indicated Tuesday they would not approve the proposal in its current form. They cited concerns related to traffic, density and the proposal’s lack of commercial or office space.
  • Text Amendment to the Sustainable Development Conditional Zoning District related to the “Responsible Person.”  Changes are specific to the Veridea project due to the majority of land remaining undeveloped. 
  •  Quasi-judicial hearing for a Major Site Plan at Nichols Plaza for two (2) proposed 4-story apartment buildings for 270 units on 15.38 acres.
  •  UDO Amendments including, but not limited to, changes to increase landscape buffers between uses, set minimum parking requirements for mail delivery, increase residential driveway lengths to 20-feet.
  • Planning Committee recommendations to amend the Land Use Plan to add Commercial Services or Employment uses at future major intersection including Jenks Road at Green Level Church Road, Old Smithfield Road/Sunset Lake Road at East Williams Street, Kelly Road at Apex Barbecue Road, and Humie Olive Road at New Hill Olive Chapel Road
  • Rezoning for 6.39 acres of Office Employment on Roberts Road adjacent to The Pines at Wake Crossing subdivision and close to the new Green Level High School
  • PUD Amendment for Preserve at White Oak Creek to 9.15 acres
  • Council Member Bill Jensen has initiated a possible new policy to couple residential development to non-residential development.  While no UDO amendments or policy changes have been introduced for staff consideration or public input, Mr. Jensen has shared ideas for home builders to form a partnership that invests part of their profit into non-residential development. 

Cary:

  • In a study by Niche, Morrisville and Cary ranked as the number one and number two suburbs to live in North Carolina. The study took into account factors such as cost of living, education and public schools, real estate, crime rates, availability of jobs and more.
  • At the most recent work session The Cary Community Plan called Imagine Cary as discussed. The council mostly focused on transportation recommendations. The following were approved by council to be included in the final draft to be voted on at the January 24th council meeting:
    • Council agreed with the recommendation for North Carolina 54/Chapel Hill Road to have an ultimate width of six lanes median divided.
    • Council agreed with the recommendation for Yates Store Road and Batchelor Road to follow existing property lines to the extent feasible.
    • After much debate council agreed to leave Green Level Church Road as a four lane median divided road to handle future traffic. Staff was directed to look at ways to be sensitive to the historic area.
    • Council agreed with the recommendation for Holly Springs and Tryon Road to be six lanes median divided.
    • After much debate council agreed to leave the Cary Parkway Extension on the map to connect to Trinity Road. Staff was directed to do a focused study on future development on Harrison from Cary Parkway to I-40 to find out what impacts may occur if the Cary Parkway is extended.
  • Council approved the new Cary Community Plan to replace their Land Use Plan at the Jan. 24 meeting.  Also LDO Amendments Round 37 were approved which were items that would coincide with the new Cary Community Plan.
  • Cary’s Total building permits were up 4% in 2016 over 2015, total new single-family dwelling permits were flat and Non-residential new construction permits down 13%

Chapel Hill:

  • The Town of Chapel Hill may have an opportunity for you to serve on the Planning Commission, a volunteer advisory board to the Town Council. There are currently openings for four members since the Council recently increased membership for the commission. Planning Commission members serve three-year terms. The commission meets at 7 p.m. on the first and third Tuesdays of every month (except July) at Chapel Hill Town Hall, 405 Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd. Apply by noon Monday, Feb. 20, by completing an application form, at www.townofchapelhill.org/boards,  and attend the Commission meeting on Feb. 7 or Feb. 21. During these meetings, you will be invited to make a brief statement about your interest and respond to any follow-up questions. The Planning Commission will make its recommendation at its Feb. 21 meeting, and the Council will schedule the appointments for Feb. 27.
  • The Council will consider creating the Elkin Hills Neighborhood Conservation Zoning Overlay Districts (Conservation District-10A and Conservation District-10B); and apply them to this Neighborhood through the Zoning Atlas. The Neighborhood Conservation District (NCD) is an overlay-zoning district that includes a special set of development standards intended to protect the character of a residential neighborhood in response to redevelopment pressures.
  • To share preliminary concepts for three segments of the Morgan Creek Trail project, the Town of Chapel Hill has scheduled a public forum at 6 p.m. Monday, Feb. 20, in Meeting Room A of the Chapel Hill Public Library. Staff and the design firm will share current thinking on the project. “We will gather input and comments from the public that will be analyzed prior to development of a more detailed plan,” said Bill Webster, Chapel Hill Parks and Recreation planning and development manager. “This will be a very important meeting that will help set the future direction of these projects.”
  • The Town Council approved moving ahead with design and permitting for five projects that could help reduce flooding and improve water quality in the Lower Booker Creek subwatershed. Read more: http://www.newsobserver.com/news/local/community/chapel-hill-news/article127382639.html

Durham (City):

  • Durham residents interested in giving their input on how the City of Durham should spend their tax dollars in the coming year now have more ways to provide feedback including a new online survey, Coffee with Council meetings, and upcoming public hearings. New for this year, residents are encouraged to give their input on how the City spends its resources through a budget priority survey.
  • The Durham Historic Preservation Commission will hold public hearings on Tuesday, February 7, 2017, at 8:30 a.m. in the City Council Committee Rom, 2nd Floor, 101 City Hall Plaza, to hear the following requests: Holloway Street Local Historic District Expansion and Preservation Plan Amendment (X1000003) is a privately-initiated petition to expand the Holloway Street Local Historic District zoning overlay, including the area currently within the 2009 National Register District expansion, additional properties for consideration, and proposed removal of the designation at 208 N. Elizabeth Street. The proposal also includes corresponding amendments to the Cleveland Street and Holloway Street Local Historic District Preservation Plan. The proposed expansion generally encompasses an area north of the existing Holloway Street local historic district, including properties along North Queen Street to the west, North Elizabeth Street to the east, and Mallard Street to the north.

Fuquay-Varina:

  • The waste water treatment plant is currently undergoing a $34M expansion that will increase its capacity from 1 million gallons/day to 3 million and will be expandable to 6 million.
  • The town is updating their community transportation plan (CTP).  The next CTP Steering committee meeting will be held on February 2, 2017 from 5-7 pm at Town Hall.  The next CTP Public workshop will be held March 2, 2017 from 5:30-7:30 pm at the Public Service Center, 1415 Holland Road.  For more information visit http://www.fuquay-varina.org/DocumentCenter/View/1792
  • The 2035 Community Vision Land Use Plan, once adopted, will establish a long-term growth and development patterns in the town.  The next LUP Project Steering committee meeting will be held on February 22, 2017 from 5:30-7:30 PM at Town Hall.  For more information visit http://www.fuquay-varina.org/713/2035-Community-Land-Use-Plan

Holly Springs:

  • ·       Peter Villadsen was sworn in as a member of the Town Council on Jan. 17. He had been chosen by the council to replace Linda Hunt Williams, who resigned in December after being elected to the N.C. House of Representatives.

Morrisville:

·       Special PZB Meeting - Comprehensive Transportation Plan Update Work Session: Thursday, February 16. During the Work Session, the consultants and the Planning & Zoning Board will review the public input and discuss issues identification and roadway recommendations. The consultants will also provide some information on the GIS work that the consultant team will do examine the impacts of different growth scenarios on the Town's transportation network.

Raleigh:

  • February 7, 2017, 7:00 p.m. Public Hearings
    • STC-08-2016 - Pearl Road at Camelot Village Avenue
    • Z-22-16 - Six Forks Road
    • Z-24-16 - Litchford Road
    • Z-30-16 - Varsity Drive
    • Z-34-16 - Glenwood Avenue
    • Z-36-16 - North Tarboro Street
    • Z-39-16 - Green Acres Lane
    • Southern Gateway Corridor Study
    • CP-4-16 - Comprehensive Plan Amendments to Southern Gateway Corridor Study
    • CP-5-16 - Removal of Ashe/Morgan Connector
    • TC-1-16 - Historic Development District Guidelines
    • Raleigh ETJ - Relinquishment of 15 Acres to Wake County - Long/Williams Property
  • Raleigh-based Highwoods Properties, which is the biggest office landlord in the Triangle, wants a sidewalk along Highwoods Boulevard between Atlantic Avenue and Capital Boulevard, but doesn’t want to pay for the entire project on its own. So the company is seeking help from the city, which has a sidewalk-building program. The problem for Highwoods: Raleigh’s program doesn’t see the street, just outside the Beltline in North Raleigh, as a priority, ranking Highwoods Boulevard 123 on its list of 217 city streets that need pedestrian improvements. At its current pace, the city likely wouldn’t get around to building the sidewalks itself for about a decade. Now, Raleigh city council members are considering not only Highwoods’ proposal – to share the $600,000 construction expense, as well as undetermined design and land acquisition costs – but how they should respond when offered a chance to enter a public-private partnership. Raleigh has no official guidelines or criteria for entering such partnerships.
  • Update to the Permit Application: In an effort to capture more detailed information at submittal we have made updates to the Permit Application. The areas with the most significant changes are under the Right-of-Way and Utility sections.

The changes include:

    • A link to the Development Services Guide where all development review processes and requirements are described
    • Project information section where the clients select review type and specific work to be preformed
    • Right-of-Way permit are now allows for street, lane, sidewalk closures, and utility cuts
    • Added a drop down selection for meter size
    • Added water and sewer service section (Stubs for water and sewer)
    • Added a hyperlink to the Utility Service Addendum, which allows listings for multiple addresses or lot numbers

The NEW Permit Application is currently available on the web. Effective February 1, 2017, the old Permit Application will no longer be accepted.

  • Changes have been made to streamline the Stub Permit Process. Customers wishing to obtain a stub permit to install new water or sewer to the existing City of Raleigh main can now apply at the same time as building or concurrent review. This saves on both time and paperwork. Single parcel service connection can use the Permit Application to obtain both building and stub permits. Or the stub permit can be issued with concurrent review (which is Final Site and Infrastructure Construction plans review). Multiple parcel connections can be issued with Concurrent Review prior to lot recordation with the use of the Utility Service Addendum. Process change will be effective February 1, 2017 with a grace period until March 6, 2017.

TCC News:

Upcoming Events: 

Luncheon Learn on March 30, 2017 at 11:30 am - 1 o’clock pm at One Eleven Place in Cary, NC
"Go Big and Go Home! The Triangle's Next New Town - Chatham Park!"

Come hear Preston Development outline their plans for what will be the largest development project in the history of North Carolina!  Keynote Speakers:Vanessa Jenkins, Chuck Smith and Robin Rose.

March 8th Coffee Chat with Duke Energy – TCC Member Only event! 

Interested in becoming a TCC Member – Join now at www.tricc.org or call the TCC office at 919 812-7785.
TCC Members - When you do nothing you feel overwhelmed and powerless. But when you get involved you feel the sense of hope and accomplishment that comes from knowing you are working to make things better -. Maya Angelou
 

Get involved by joining one of our committees in 2017.  Call Charlene to find out more about the events committee or the new 2017 Election Task Force at 919 812-7785.

TCC Coffee Chat with Chatham County

The Triangle Community Coalition had another successful Coffee Chat with Chatham County on Wednesday, March 1, 2017!

Joining our members in an informal chat were County Manager Renee Paschal, Assistant County Manager Dan LaMontagne, Planning Director Jason Sullivan, EDC President Kyle Touchstone, Central Permitting & Inspections Director Jenny Williams, Parks & Rec Director Tracy Burnett and CSS Chief Operations Officer Chris Blice.

We provided the county with a better perspective of the Triangle Community Coalition's goal to be a proactive partner in growth and land use issues and to work with senior staff and elected officials to develop policies, regulations, and procedures to encourage economic development, produce predictable (yet flexible) outcomes for all stakeholders, and protect the community's interests. 

Chatham County staff appreciated the TCC’s ability to offer objective facts and information in efforts to improve public policy debates and create effective working relationships between the business community and local government.  We had some great interaction with the TCC membership in attendance and had opportunity to talk about the following:

Kyle Touchstone, EDC President – Business Development

  •  55% of Chatham County residents commute out of the county to work.
  •  There are only  two apartment complexes on the east side of the county - very limited supply.
  •  Sales tax leakage (residents spending money outside the county) - $9MM annually (typical for a bedroom community).
  • The Moncure and Siler City mega sites will have the major workforce impact in the county.
  • The Moncure mega site consists of 2,285 acres, is serviced by high speed fiber, is located on Old US Highway 1 and has railroad access.  The site has recently drawn more interest:
  1. both sites received $4MM for infrastructure from the Golden Leaf Fund
  • The County’s largest manufacturer is in Siler City – old Purdue poultry plant - all due diligence is being done now, plant has gone through quite a bit of demolition and in April the re construction will begin.  The Kelwood Textile facility has also been purchased - $70 MM investment and 700 jobs (new).
  • The county is focused on providing adequate infrastructure for these new commercial enterprises, focusing on:
  1. DENR - I&I work, through the mount aire project, looking for additional investments but there is too much wealth and employment status on the East side of the county which hinder the County’s ability to leverage financial aid on the State and Federal level.
  • Chatham Park – over 8,000 acres in size.
  1. 2200 acres in the first phase
  2. 5,000,000 SF of total office proposed
  3. 400-500 multi-family development
  4. The rest of first phase is residential
  • HWY 15-501 corridor - becoming more interesting for outside developers.
  1. More concentration of population, but there are a lot of infrastructure issues (private wastewater systems, community wells, etc.)
  2. There are no public utility systems extended this far up from Pittsboro and the County system
  • HWY 751/US HWY 64 intersection is a mixed use node for the County - working with the Town of Apex on infrastructure.
  • High-speed internetis a huge issue for the entire county.

Renee Paschal, County Manager 

  • Chatham - fastest growing North Carolina County in 2015.
  • Currently developing a Comprehensive Plan – it is in the final stages.
  1. Focused on the fringes of the County and places like Chatham Park
  • Public input last week, survey out now.
  1. Seeking a balanced plan - conservation and development potential, commercial and industrial growth
  • Currently the county receives 90% of its tax base from residential.
  • 2 new schools are being designed.
  • Health and Sciences building at Briar Chapel is new and expanding.
  • Chatham Park - broken ground on commercial and office buildings near Northwood High School:
  1. Residential to start in 2018
  2. The county will be providing building inspections
  3. Will be balanced with not too much residential, commercial breaking ground first
  • Preston Development is seeking legislation to allow a special assessment district for Chatham Park – future land users will be assessed to pay for major infrastructure. 
  1. How this works - owners must petition the government to get this in the works
  2. Process involves public hearings
  3. County gives the framework for what will be taxed and reimbursed (infrastructure - roads, water/sewer, sidewalk)
  4. Based on the benefit
  • Most staff members live in other counties, cannot afford Chatham County.  County is focused on how to make housing affordable.

Tracy Burnett - Parks and Rec

  • 2009 parks master plan -- one district park planned for each of the 4 quadrants of the county.

Jenny Williams - Inspections and Permitting

  • Inspectors are increasing their certifications - level 3 required.
  • Currently need 3 inspectors.  Level 2are highly marketable - so poaching is a concern.
  • Working to get to electronic plan review, a mobile app, and an expedited review process.
  • 14 day turnaround for building permits (commercial) and similar for residential, but due to staffing and work volume these are sliding.
  • There is a 5 day express option, but staffing level is limiting this.
  • County developed an online portal to point to online permit status, but high speed internet is limiting this implementation fully.
  • Mobile will allow email for inspection status (pass/fail).

Jason Sullivan - Planning Director

  • Comp plan has been worked on since Jan last year:
  1. Community meetings last week
  2. Public input through March 24th
  3. Finalize document in April - May/June for public hearing
  4. End of summer adoption
  • Up until last year there were over 380 square miles of unzoned property in the county, now the whole county is zoned.
  • Why was this comp plan updated done?
  1. A shooting range was built in an area without zoning and citizens complained – without zoning in place, the county could do nothing and it went into litigation.
  2. In western part of the county, there was a land owner that submitted for mining permits through the state, but there was nothing that the County could do -- most of those properties are in conservation easements
  3. Majority of the county west of I-87 was unzoned, so this 388 square miles was the target.  2 zoning densities put in place:
        R-1 - one unit per acre
        R-5 - one unit per 5
  • Joint Land Use Plan with Cary:
  1. Revisit the plan with Cary - 5 years
  2. Is the plan working?  Lengthy plan to get this in place, took 7 years instead of the 9 month envisioned
  3. Plan has been in place for 5 years and provides clarity
  4. Growth pressures in this area?  4 DU/AC is dramatic changes - look at development patterns in Wake County
  5. Old property owners are selling or thinking or selling out, and seems like a hot market/area
  • Looking at economic development, land use planning, looking at interconnection between tracts/development nodes.
  • Working with Land Design out of Charlotte.

Dan LeMontagne - Assistant County Manager/County Engineer

  • Water supply – regional demand for water:
  1. OWASA/Durham County connections, Sanford - Lee County, Siler City & Town of Pittsboro
  • Looking for interconnectivity.
  • Working with Pittsboro/OWASA - application to the state for additional allocation and a treatment plant on the west side of Jordan Lake.
  1. No inter-basin transfer issues
  2. Feasibility study for the western intake for the regional plant is being done by Hazen & Sawyer
  • Generational solution for the county to implement a regional plant of the scale being sought.
  • 35 MGD plant, which is a significant sized water treatment facility – is going to be phased - Durham is base loaded 16.5 MGD (majority of plant capacity), Chatham County is 10 MGD, and Pittsboro is smallest at 2 MGD.
  • County has 3 systems:
  1. North - Moncure - Beaver Creek Road - 3 MGD capacity and there is a 3 MGD interconnection with Durham, so a total of 6 MGD available at the current time
  • Current capacity is good for 10yr based on current growth, but other partners (east side of the county experiencing higher than projected growth rates) may result in a shorter duration.

Chris Bice - Chatham County Schools

  • 8,600 students this year.
  • Chatham Park is proposing 11 school sites - seems adequate for 700/students per elementary and middle schools and a high school with 1200/1400 students.  Chatham Park is attracting schools other than traditional schools (Thales Academy).  On the Chatham Park master plan there are 11 sites, but 3 are in one location for Thales Academy. Town of Pittsboro is working with Chatham Park to commit to provide what is needed to build the schools for all the children that Chatham Park will generate. The 30 year buildout for Chatham Park will double the school capacity of Chatham County as a whole.
  • Northern Village of Chatham Park will need about 4 of the school sites.
  • The county currently has 17 schools and 2 new ones under construction, one of which is high school.
  • Most buyers in Amberley ask about a school.  The area of Chatham County on the eastern side of Lake Jordan won't be ready for school until the population grows.
  • The new Seaforth Road High School will be 7 miles closer to Amberley than is Northwood High School.

TCC Coffee Chat with Town of Fuquay-Varina SUMMARY

The Triangle Community Coalition had another successful Coffee Chat with the Town of Fuquay-Varina  Elected Officials and Staff on January 18, 2017


Joining our members in an informal chat were Mayor John Byrne,  Commissioner Blake Massengill, Commissioner Marilyn Gardner, Town Manager Adam Mitchell, Assistant Town Manager Mark Matthews, Planning Director Samantha Smith, Planning Dept. Mike Sorensen, Communications Director Susan Weis, Public Works Director Arthur Mouberry, Town Engineer Tracy Stephenson, Economic Development Director Jim Seymour, Public Utilities Director Jay Meyers, Inspections Director Chris Hinnant, and Police Chief Laura Fahnestock.

We provided the Town of Fuquay-Varina with a better perspective of the Triangle Community Coalition's goal to be a proactive partner in growth and land use issues and to work with senior staff and elected officials to develop policies, regulations, and procedures to encourage economic development, produce predictable (yet flexible) outcomes for all stakeholders, and protect the community's interests.

The town appreciated the TCC’s ability to offer objective facts and information in efforts to improve public policy debates and create effective working relationships between the business community and local government.  We had some great interaction with the TCC membership in attendance and had opportunity to talk about the following:

Mayor John Byrne

·       Talked about focusing on partnerships for future growth.
·       Finding a balanced approach to taxes and fees
·       AAA Bond Rating – FV is the smallest town in NC with this rating

Commissioner Marilyn Gardner

·       Grew up south of Fuquay-Varina
·       Wants to ensure that Fuquay-Varina does not lose its identity as a small town

Town Manager Adam Mitchell

·       Sees TCC as a partner – takes a team to grow
·       Unprecedented growth in the area
·       The meeting was held in the new public works facility recently opened and consolidated several facilities/functions
·       In the process of updating land use plan and will be engaging the public during the process
·       February the council and staff will hold their planning retreat

ü  Growth & quality of life are the focus

ü  So far in January, 53 new single family building permits have been issues.

ü  Both last year and in 2015 the Town issued approximately 700 building permits

ü  540 on the horizon. The Town needs to begin planning for it now.

ü  Growth brings challenges

§  Traffic congestion, can’t rely on NCDOT

§  Passed $21M bond referendum to include Judd Parkway - 2020 completion

§  Bass Lake/Sunset Road/Hilltop Needmore interchange improved

·       FV has more parks acres per capita than any other town in NC
·       The waste water treatment plant is currently undergoing a $34M expansion that will increase its capacity from 1 million gallons/day to 3 million and will be expandable to 6 million.
·       Water – planning today for the future
·       Development spreading outward towards NC42
·       2016 received $6M in government money and in 2017 $4.5M so far, for roads
·       Has clear vision for the Town’s future

Assistant Town Manager Mark Matthews

·       Key projects in 2017

ü  Fleming Loop Park – $2.7M to invest into park

ü  Downtown Art Center

ü  New Library approved

ü  New schools – High School adjacent to South Lakes; sites for new middle and elementary schools acquired.

Communications Susan Weis

·       Using social media
·       New brand - “A Dash More”

Planning Department Samantha Smith

·       New land development ordinance – flexibility
·       Updating transportation plan which is 10 years old
·       Will be applying to Wake County for ETJ expansion
·       35 commercial & residential projects are currently in review
·       Currently tax base is 74% residential and 26% commercial.  Goal is to be closer to 65/35

Public Utilities Jay Meyers

         ·         WWTP expansion – on time and under budget
         ·         Water – FV buys water and is looking at possibility of producing its own water
         ·         Town interested in public/private partnership to leverage town funds
         ·         Water line replacement program is in place
         ·         Moving toward remote water meter recording capabilities

Economic Development Jim Seymour

·       In December 2014 Town adopted new economic development plan
·       Looking to expand beyond residential – high end retail/commercial
·       2015 Study – more capacity for development in the downtown areas
·       Proximity of Campbell University and Fort Bragg are benefits for FV
·       2015 incentive plan/policy put in place.  Bob Baker Company was the 1st to use and created 42 new jobs
·       Town website – includes an interactive development map
·       Expanding fiber network for town facilities

Police Chief Laura Fahnestock

·       2016 report on policing – implementing the President’s 21st Century Policing Policy in Fuquay
·       Trainingon crisis intervention and de-escalation
·       Opioid epidemic is focus
·       In 2016 – year over year - 26% reduction in violent crime and 6% reduction in property crimes
·       Community engagement : “Coffee with Cops” proactive not reactive
·       Fully staffed – 41 officers, half live in FV

Q&A:

Craig Duerr, Pulte Group: Development community looking for flexibility and predictability, some challenges for a growing community
If you are interested in participating in future meetings with Town of Fuquay-Varina or future Coffee Chats, watch for notices or contact the TCC offices at 919 812-7785 or Charlene Logan at charlenel@tricc.org to reserve your spot! 
These programs are a great way for you, as an exclusive benefit as a TCC member, to become active and help the TCC strengthen our relationships with local jurisdictions throughout the Triangle.  

 


 

TCC "in the KNOW" December 2016

December 2016 Updates

 Nationwide:

  • Fewer Americans signed contracts to buy homes in November. The decrease likely reflects the drag caused by rising mortgage rates and the shallow inventory of properties on the market. The National Association of Realtors seasonally adjusted pending home sales index fell 2.5 percent to 107.3, the lowest reading since the start of 2016. Pending sales declined in the Midwest, South and West, while improving in the Northeast. The slowdown marks a reversal for the housing market, as sales growth has been solid for the past year.

Statewide:

  • Tax changes went into effect Jan. 1:
    • The corporate tax rate dropped from about 4 percent to 3 percent – a move that makes North Carolina even more competitive in luring economic suitors from competing states such as South Carolina and Virginia.
    • Personal income tax will decreased from 5.75 percent to just under 5.5 percent.
  • Republicans called for an additional special session of the legislature which resulted in a substantial curtailment of Democratic Governor Roy Cooper’s authority. Cooper has threatened to file suit contesting the constitutionality of the law.

Regional:

  • There is no question the Raleigh-Durham International Airport has bounced back from the Great Recession, announcing several new flights and a record-breaking number of passengers this year. About 344 flights travel to and from RDU each day, and nearly 11 million people passed through the airport by the end of 2016. That tops the airport’s current record, set in 2000, of 10.4 million passengers. In 2009, RDU saw about 9 million passengers, down from 9.7 million the prior year, likely a sign of economic trouble and uncertainty.
  • Toll rates on the 17-mile Triangle Expressway highway increased 3.5 percent Jan. 1. Quick Pass drivers will pay an extra 9 cents to drive the entire expressway; commuters without the Quick Pass will pay up to 16 cents more.
  • There are two new interchanges under construction on 540; one located at Old Holly Springs-Apex Road will open in early 2017 while the other planned for Morrisville Parkway will open in 2019.

Chatham County:

·       The Town of Siler City has been awarded a $1.5 million grant through the Community Development Block Grant – Economic Development program, which is administered through the North Carolina Rural Infrastructure Authority (RIA). The grant, based on Mountaire Farm’s announcement of 700 new jobs for its future processing facility in the Town of Siler City, will help the town make wastewater system upgrades. “We are very pleased with the announcement of this grant for the Town of Siler City to upgrade our wastewater system,” said Mayor John Grimes. For more information, contact the Chatham Economic Development Corporation at 919-542-8274.

  • The Golden LEAF Foundation has announced grants totaling $8 million to be used for further infrastructure development of the two Chatham County industrial megasites near Siler City and Moncure. The grants from the foundation’s new Major Site Development Initiative (MSDI) are aimed at attracting major employers to rural and economically-distressed areas. “We are extremely pleased and appreciative to receive these awards from the Golden LEAF Foundation said Kyle Touchstone, president of the Chatham Economic Development Corporation. Extending these utilities to the two sites eliminates risk to potential site users and makes them more marketable to major industries.”

Durham County:

  • Durham County Commissioners certified results from the Nov. 8 election in which the majority of voters passed more than $170 million worth of bonds.

Orange County:

  • As both Orange and Durham counties are asked to support a memorandum of understanding to address a $250 million "funding gap" for the future Durham-Orange Light Rail Transit project, the outstanding question is who's picking up the check. Orange County commissioners voted 5-2 for the memorandum of understanding, with Commissioners Earl McKee and Renee Price voting against it.  GoTriangle is committed to working with partners to identify additional funding sources to help complete the D-O LRT Project. For more information, visit http://ourtransitfuture.com/projects/durham-orange/

Wake County:

Wake County Commissioner Jessica Holmes represents District 3 and was first elected in 2014.  She abruptly  resigned over a dispute centered on the makeup of the County’s Affordable Housing Task Force and subsequently changed her mind and rescinded her resignation.  The TCC’s 2017 Chairman Tom Anhut was selected as one of the members of the Task Force.

Apex:

·       Council adopted a Tax Incentive Policy to attract high-paying jobs.

·       Town Council – Upcoming Public Hearings

o   January 3, 2017 Agenda

§  Rezoning Case #16CZ26 Pricewood PUD (continued from December 20, 2016)

§  Meridian at Nichols Plaza Major Site Plan

§  Unified Development Ordinance Amendment Jason Barron Request (continued from December 20, 2016)

o   January 17, 2017 Agenda

o   Unified Development Ordinance Amendment Staff Requests (continued from December 20, 2016)

o   Rezoning Case #16CZ30 The Preserve at White Oak Creek PUD Amendment

o   Rezoning Case #16CZ33 Roberts Road 

o   Transportation Plan Amendment Lufkin Road/Burma Drive Minor Collector 

o   2030 Land Use Map Amendment Planning Committee Recommendations

Cary:

  • Cary will be deciding if the section from near the intersection of Cary Parkway to the Maynard intersection will be ultimately six or four lanes. This will happen at a January 3rd work session. It is important to point out that there is no funding or plans for funding for this section of state road. That means any change is likely to be at least ten years away.
  • Imagine Cary: based on our collaborative work, the plan will most likely move to adoption on January 24.
  • Cary and Raleigh have landed on a list of the top boomtowns in the country, and Cary was at the top. On SmartAsset’s list of the “Top 10 Boomtowns of 2016,” Cary scored a 100 percent based on several factors, including net migration rate, housing growth, unemployment, 2015-16 change in unemployment and GDP growth. Raleigh, ranked 10th, scored an 87.05.
  • The Town Council voted on the Mills Rezoning that would put a residential area just South of Green Hope High School. Several conditions were added, including limited detached dwelling units or townhomes to a maximum of 40, adding a requirement for two car garages, putting pedestrian connections in place, increasing buffer sizes and making certain design requirements.
  • Council will hold a public hearing regarding minor updates to the LDO on Jan. 8, 2017 regarding free standing garages, neighborhood meetings for example.
  • Council discussion to adopt new Town Standards and Specifications at the Jan. 8, 2017 meeting.
  • Recommendation to Council to award construction contract for the Crabtree Creek Greenway along the southern lake shore of Lake Crabtree that would provide a vital link to Morrisville’s section of the greenway and the Black Creek Greenway.
  • Council approved the M-16 (Alston Ridge Middle School) sketch plan at their December quasi-judicial hearing.

Durham (City):

  • The Durham City Council is once again considering saving taxpayers thousands of dollars by eliminating primaries from municipal elections. A vote by the seven-member council Jan. 3 would set the reconsideration in motion. The council would then hold a public hearing Jan. 17 and have to vote on the change within 60 days after that.
  • A for-profit real estate company owned by Duke University has acquired the 300 Swift Ave. apartment building that opened in 2014 near Duke’s Central Campus in Durham.  According to county records, Durham Realty Inc., which is managed by the university’s Office of Counsel, paid $50 million for the
    202-unit apartment building. The seller is a partnership led by Charlotte real estate development firm FCA Partners.
  • On January 1, 2017, new site plan and preliminary plat pre-submittal requirements will take effect.
    A pre-application conference will be required for any site plan or preliminary plat application on property zoned with a development plan, or with a design district zoning designation. This amendment was approved by City Council on December 5th and the Board of Commissioners on December 12th as part of text amendment TC1600004.
  • Meeting the Pre-application Conference Requirement:

ü  In order to satisfy the requirements of paragraph 3.2.2.B of the Unified Development Ordinance applicants can schedule either a Concept Meeting or Pre-Submittal Conference prior to their intake meeting date.  Evidence that the pre-application conference requirement has been satisfied will need to be provided at the intake meeting in order for the site plan or preliminary plat application to be accepted. 

ü  Meeting request forms can be accessed at: http://durhamnc.gov/388/Development-Review-Process-Overview

ü  For more information, please contact Alysia Taylor at  Alysia.Bailey-Taylor@DurhamNC.gov

ü  Planning Webpage: http://durhamnc.gov/338/City-County-Planning

  • For Development Review Information: http://durhamnc.gov/388/Development-Review-Process-Overview
  • Development Services Center (DSC) 
       Effective January 12, 2017, the Customer Service and Plan Intake functions of the City/County Planning Department and City/County Inspections Department will be operating temporarily out of Conference Room GA on the Ground Floor of Durham City Hall, directly across from the Inspections Department lobby area.  All telephone numbers, office hours and services will remain unchanged. 

   This move is to allow for construction of the Development Services Center (DSC), scheduled to open in April 2017.  The goal of the DSC is to help people better navigate through the development review process in Durham. Whether constructing a deck on your home or building a high-rise, customers will experience an improved & better coordinated development review process, and benefit from improved customer service. 

   This new center will coordinate over 70 administrative reviews, permits, and approvals involving 22 departments, agencies, and advisory boards to provide an improved “One-Stop Shop” experience for customers. 

   The opening of this new center is in direct response to the Durham Joint Economic Development Strategic Plan and the Development Review Performance Audit, which noted the need for time-sensitive, easy-to-navigate development review process and improvement of internal collaboration on review turnarounds in the Site Plan, Exempt Plat and Final Plat approval process. 

   More details about this center along with helpful information to further ease the development review process will be forthcoming, including a new website.  Please contact Assistant Planning Director
Patrick Young with any questions, comments or concerns at Patrick.Young@durhamnc.gov or 919.560.4137 x28273

Hillsborough:

  • Engineering consulting firm CTC Technology & Energy made a presentation to the board on the costs and feasibility of making a public investment in a fiber optic communications network that would serve town facilities and encourage third parties to deliver services to the public. The firm estimated that an initial phase, connecting a majority of town facilities and two county facilities, would cost $1.37 million. A second phase, extending fiber through the southern part of town, would cost $1.32 million. The presentation outlined different forms of public-private cooperation that could be used to spread costs and risk. Orange County is conducting its own fiber optic networking study, and representatives from the county and Orange County Schools attended the meeting to express interest in collaborating on future projects. CTC will refine its analysis to incorporate these potential partnerships.

Holly Springs:

  • Dozens of people spoke out and voiced concerns about the possibility of a large new development on Avent Ferry Road.  Town leaders voted against the proposed project.

Morrisville:

  • Public Hearing at 6:30 pm, Tuesday, January 10, 2017- Rezoning (REZ 16-04): WMCi Raleigh VIII, LLC, the property owner, is requesting to rezone 14.61 acres within Park West Village in order to revise conditions. The parcel is located at 3016 Bristol Creek Drive and is specifically identified as Wake County PIN 0754-38-0423. Additional information can be obtained by contacting Kari Grace at 919-463-6194 or kgrace@townofmorrisville.org

Raleigh:

  • New Year brings changes to Development Services -Update to the Permit Application
    In an effort to capture more detailed information at submittal we have made updates to the Permit Application. The areas with the most significant changes are under the Right-of-Way and Utility sections.  The changes include:

ü  A link to the Development Services Guide where all development review processes and requirements are described

ü  Project information section where the clients select review type and specific work to be preformed

ü  Right-of-Way permit are now allows for street, lane, sidewalk closures, and utility cuts

ü  Added a drop down selection for meter size

ü  Added water and sewer service section (Stubs for water and sewer)

ü  Added a hyperlink to the Utility Service Addendum, which allows listings for multiple addresses or lot
numbers

ü  The NEW Permit Application is currently available on the web. Effective February 1, 2017, the old Permit Application will no longer be accepted.

· Utility Service Process Improvement: Changes have been made to streamline the Stub Permit Process.

ü  Customers wishing to obtain a stub permit to install new water or sewer to the existing City of Raleigh main can now apply at the same time as building or concurrent review. This saves on both time and paperwork

ü  Single parcel service connection can use the Permit Application to obtain both building and stub permits. Or the stub permit can be issued with concurrent review (which is Final Site and Infrastructure Construction plans review)

ü  Multiple parcel connections can be issued with Concurrent Review prior to lot recordation with the use of the Utility Service Addendum

ü  Process change will be effective February 1, 2017 with a grace period until March 6, 2017

·       Raleigh plans to finish construction on the Union Station transportation hub next fall. The $90 million project on Martin Street will be a transit hub for trains and buses, and the city plans to pursue tenants to lease office and retail space. The building will have about 4,000 square feet of space to rent for retail or office use on its main level; 6,000 square feet on its lower level; and 2,700 square feet on its upper level. When it opens in 2018, Union Station is expected to breathe new life into the Warehouse District downtown.

·       Kane Realty expects to expand North Hills outward and upward on the east side of Six Forks Road, near the Interstate 440 Beltline. The development company expects to open several projects in 2017: the AC Hotel, The Cardinal senior-living center, the 12-story Midtown Plaza office building and Park Central, a retail center topped by apartments.

·       Lambert Development plans to build two projects near downtown and the Boylan Heights neighborhood. The company wants to build a three-story condominium project called 611 West South across the street from Boulted Bread. It also plans to build a 12-unit townhouse project at the corner of West and Lenoir streets.

·       Exploris School has filed a plan proposal with the city of Raleigh that would have it building a 10-story building downtown. According to plans the Raleigh charter school filed with the city this month, the building would house the K-8 charter school as well as its commercial office, and would provide internal parking.

  • The state has agreed to sell two underutilized sites on the northern end of downtown, which has drawn lots of interest from developers in recent years. A group of developers has offered $4.85 million for a 1.8-acre site on West Peace Street, across from Seaboard Station. A different group has offered $1.75 million for the

 .5-acre site of an old steam plant on North Dawson Street near the Days Inn Hotel. Both sites are zoned by the city to allow mixed-use development up to 12 stories.

  • Upcoming Public Hearings Scheduled for January 3, 2017, 7:00 p.m.
    • FY 2017-2018 Pre-Budget Hearing
    • Petition Annexations
      • Country Trail Estates
      • Family Dollar – Trawick

o   STC-06-2016 - Maiden Lane

o   Z-11-16 - North Rogers Lane

o   Z-27-16 - Alexander Drive

o   Z-31-16 - Cumberland Street

o   TC-18-16 - Animal care (indoor) - Limited Use in OX-District

o   TC-21-16 - Single unit housing (via single-family detached house) to be permitted in the MH District

TCC Updates:  

  • The TCC Annual Meeting will take place on Friday, January 12, 2017 at 8:30 a.m. and will feature the Mayors of Apex, Holly Springs, Fuquay-Varina & Pittsboro.  For more information or to register visit our website at www.tricc.org  We will also award the James R Wahlbrink Grassroots Leadership Award to a very special recipient. 
  • The business and real estate communities need a strong voice to advocate for their business, and the TCC will persevere to be the leader in the growth conversation in the Triangle.  In the coming year and years to follow, the TCC will continue to advance our approaches to influence policy to meet the ever-changing needs within the business community.  We have an exciting year planned for 2017!  Our focus will be to advocate for balanced growth by strengthening our partnerships and relationships in the community that will offer better opportunities and outcomes for our members.  

    We will need your financial commitment to carry out this mission.  Now is the time to strengthen our resolve and commitment!  Doing business in this area continues to become increasingly difficult, making the TCC more important than ever.  To join or renew your membership in 2017 visit www.tricc.org  

  • Upcoming Coffee Chats (Member Only)
    Fuquay-Varina – January 18, 2017
    Duke Energy – February Date TBD
    Upcoming Luncheon Learns:  March 30, 2017 – Chatham Park

TCC "in the KNOW" November 2016

  • November 2016 Updates

Nationwide:

  • Small business owners are rushing to get their companies – and their employees – ready for an upcoming change in overtime rules. With federal regulations that are expected to affect the paychecks of 4.2 million workers going into effect Dec. 1, human resources consultants say they’re seeing a surge in calls from owners seeking help in complying. Many business owners have procrastinated, hoping Congress might put the regulations on hold or a federal court would take a similar step in response to a lawsuit filed by a coalition of 21 states. But with just weeks until regulation goes into effect, there’s no indication owners will get a reprieve.

Statewide:

  • Top North Carolina lawmakers insist they have no plans to expand the state's Supreme Court by two seats in an effort to reclaim a majority for conservative justices, never mind a drumbeat of speculation around Raleigh and beyond.

  • North Carolina lawmakers are considering changes to the way public schools are funded after a study found that the state's current funding model is too complex, lacks transparency and accountability and at times favors wealthier counties. The study, compiled by the General Assembly's Program Evaluation Division, was presented to a joint legislative committee.

  • For the second consecutive year, North Carolina is the nation’s No. 2 best state for business according to Forbes magazine. Forbes' annual “Best States for Business” list measures which states have the best business climates and are poised to succeed going forward. North Carolina is the only state in the southeast to be ranked in the top five.

Durham County:

  • Durham County elections board is dismissing a GOP lawyer’s bid to recount 94,000 votes. The board voted unanimously that the protest lacked evidence. The three board members spent two hours listening to witnesses and decided a software glitch that blocked votes from being uploaded to the statewide tally didn’t have anything to do with accurately logging votes. Orange, Wake and Halifax counties also rejected election protests.

Orange County:

  • Orange County leaders recently learned they face some tough questions about a $250 million funding gap for the now-$1.87 billion Durham-Orange light-rail project and a December deadline to move ahead. The funding gap is expected to emerge by 2028 because of changes to state and federal funding, GoTriangle representatives told county, Chapel Hill, Carrboro and Hillsborough officials at the Assembly of Governments meeting.

  • Orange County Current Planning Staff invites mobile home park owners and other interested parties to meet with Staff to discuss and collaborate on potential revisions to its regulations on Mobile Home Park Conditional Zoning Districts to allow for temporary residential units. For more information.

Wake County:

  • Wake County voters opted for a half-cent increase to the local sales tax rate to help fund an expansion of public bus and train services. The measure passed with a 53 percent favor, according to unofficial results.

  • In April, the Orange Route was selected as the preferred path for the project. The 30-mile path will connect the 540 Outer Loop east from Holly Springs to Interstate 40 south of Garner, and then to Knightdale.

Apex:

  • Promising a “mini North Hills” for Apex, the developers of the Sweetwater neighborhood returned to the Apex Town Council to ask for permission to build 230 apartments above the ground-level retail and office space initially planned for the area. The 4-1 vote in favor of that request, with Mayor pro tem Nicole Dozier dissenting, was Apex’s first to allow the construction of what’s called vertical mixed-use development, which combines residential and commercial tenants in the same building. Sweetwater is a 165-acre, mixed-use development on the south side of U.S. 64 in west Apex designed by Triangle-based ExperienceOne Homes. This portion of the development will be managed by the Kalikow Group, a New York-based real estate investment firm. 

Cary:

  • A Raleigh builder who wants to develop about 40 townhomes near Green Hope High School plans to submit conditions to the town that he hopes will make the project more desirable to the council and the project’s neighbors. On Thursday, Nov. 11, the council unanimously voted to table the case again to the Dec. 8 meeting to give the applicant more time to submit conditions that will give them a better idea of how the project would look and feel.

  • The council approved the comprehensive plan amendment and rezoning of about 15 acres near 844 East Chatham St., west of WakeMed Soccer Park, to allow for multi-family housing.

  • Authorized the town manager to enter into an agreement with Cofounders Capital Management LLC to obtain consultant services to facilitate the growth and support for new business entities and support economic development in downtown Cary in exchange for the shared use of the third floor in The Cary Theater for an additional year.

  • Referred the Cary Community Plan to the town’s planning and zoning board with plans to hold a council work session in the coming weeks to review the comprehensive transportation plan that is part of the town’s 25-year vision.

  • Approved the Eastern Cary Gateway Special Planning Area, which covers about 800 acres bordered by Chapel Hill Road to the north, Interstate 40 to the east, Cary Towne Center to the south and Maynard Road to the west. The council decided to amend language in the plan that encourages development five to 15 stories in this area with the flexibility to have some three- to four-story structures.

Carrboro:

  • The Carrboro Board of Aldermen deliberated over an amendment that would alter the Land Use Ordinance by instituting a new policy for citizen comment. The amendment, which would remove the protest provision from local government, would require a supermajority vote by board members to act on any community petitions. The board held off on a decision, but will continue the discussion at a public hearing Dec. 17.

Chapel Hill:

  • The Council will hold public hearings to receive public comment on the rezoning of the Elkin Hills Neighborhood Conservation Zoning Overlay Districts and apply them to the Zoning Atlas. The Council will consider continuing the public hearings to the Council Business Meeting on Jan. 23, 2017.

  • The Council held a public hearing to consider a proposal to blend Land Use Management Ordinance (LUMO) Section 5.14 (Signs) and Section 3.11.4.4., the Ephesus-Fordham District Sign Standards, into one comprehensive sign ordinance. The public hearing was continued to Dec. 5, 2016. 

Holly Springs:

  • At its meeting Nov. 15, the Holly Springs Town Council approved plans for two subdivisions where the subdivision developers will build portions of connector roads planned for years on the Holly Springs Comprehensive Transportation Plan.

  • The council also approved a residential zoning change for seven acres at Bluffs Drive and Berman Edge Road adjacent to the Morgan Park subdivision.

  • The council approved a special exception use and development plan, allowing for the conversion of a vacant residence off S. Main Street into an office in downtown Holly Springs.

Knightdale:

  • The Town Council is considering an amendment to the Unified Development Ordinance that would modify maintenance requirements for stormwater infrastructure in subdivisions with active homeowner’s associations, putting more of the responsibility on the HOAs.

Morrisville:

  • The Town Council voted Nov. 7 to do away with a planned brick-and-mortar pool enclosure for the Morrisville Aquatics and Fitness Center in an effort to curb costs of an increasingly expensive renovation. Jerry Allen, the town’s director of parks, recreation and cultural resources, said the town could save about $1 million by forgoing a traditional roof and instead using a vinyl or glass-paneled dome to cover the pool. The pool is still slated to be expanded from four lanes to eight.

  • The Town of Morrisville is proposing to remove a portion of the Morrisville East Connector from Nova Drive to the planned McCrimmon Parkway Extension from the Transportation Plan. Contact Brad West 919-463-6926 or bwest@townofmorrisville.org for additional information.

  • Development Agreement (DEV 16-01): The Town of Morrisville and Ammons East Corporation (Wake Competition Center) are requesting to enter into a development agreement. The parcels are specifically identified as Wake County PIN 0756-41-0733. Contact Courtney Tanner at 919-463-6199 or ctanner@townofmorrisville.org for additional information.

Raleigh:

  • The city plans to finish construction on Union Station a year from now, and the downtown transportation hub will be operational in January 2018. City leaders need to approve a strategy for pursuing tenants, Union Station will have about 4,000 square feet of space to rent for retail or office use on its main level, 6,000 square feet on its lower level and 2,700 square feet on its upper level.

  • The Raleigh City Council on Nov. 1 approved an amendment to the Unified Development Ordinance (UDO) to incorporate stormwater regulation standards for smaller sites undergoing development or redevelopment that were previously exempt. With this revision, development of previously exempt lots less than one acre used for single family/duplex dwelling or less than half an acre used for any other purpose that exceed new impervious area limits are required to provide an evaluation to determine how development will impact stormwater downstream and identify the need for stormwater management. The policy change will take effect on Sunday, Nov. 27.

  • December 6, 2016, 7:00 p.m. Public Hearings:

    • Community Development Annual Action Plan

    • STC-05-2016 - Washington Terrace

    • Water AR 1353 - Craftsman Drive Improvements (PU 2013-1)

    • Water AR 1353-A - Craftsman Drive Improvements (PU 2013-1)

    • Sewer AR 1354 - Knollrock Drive Improvements (PU 2014-1)

    • Sewer AR 1355 - Coronado Drive Improvements (PU 2014-2)

    • Sewer AR 1356 - Pinecroft Drive Improvements (PU 2014-4)

    • Sidewalk Petition - Yadkin Drive

    • Z-15-16 - Falls of Neuse Road

    • Z-17-16 - Creedmoor Road Conditional Use District

    • Z-18-16 - Homewood Banks Drive

    • Z-21-16 - Lumley Road

    • Z-25-16 - Leesville Road

    • Z-26-16 - Multiple Properties between New Market Way and North Ridge Drive

    • TC-15-16 - Maximum Area Devoted to Limited Commercial Uses in RX and OX Districts

    • TC-16-16 - Dwelling Units in Congregate Care

    • TC-19-16 - Wall Signage.

TCC "in the KNOW" October 2016

October 2016 Updates 

As we look forward to 2017, we see challenges and opportunities.  The upcoming state and national elections will directly affect business in the Triangle.  As the topic of growth and transit are central to discussions surrounding the elections, we can expect continued swings in political and policy ideologies.   

Your role in supporting the Triangle Community Coalition’s mission of promoting public policy that balances economic development and growth has been critical to our success.  Through our Coffee Chats, Luncheon Learn programs, surveys, publications, and advocacy, we have proactively provided our members with valuable information surrounding the topics of land use, property rights, and growth in the Triangle.

The TCC is needed now more than ever! 

The business and real estate communities need a strong voice to advocate for their business, and the TCC will persevere to be the leader in the growth conversation in the Triangle. In the coming year and years to follow, the TCC will continue to advance our approaches to influence policy to meet the ever-changing needs within the business community.  We have an exciting year planned for 2017!  Our focus will be to advocate for balanced growth by strengthening our partnerships and relationships in the community that will offer better opportunities and outcomes for our members.

Now is the time to strengthen our resolve and commitment!  The TCC looks forward to the challenges ahead and the opportunity to advocate for you and your business.To renew or join the TCC, please visit our website to download your membership form today at www.tricc.org

 Statewide:

  • Early voting in Orange, Durham, Wake and Johnston Counties began on October 20. The General Election will be held on Tuesday, November 8. Get out and vote!
  • The state is still recovering from Hurricane Matthew which caused $1.5 billion in property damage to 100,000 buildings, left 900,000 without power, killed at least 26 people and caused environmental problems.

Durham County:

  • A light rail stop at North Carolina Central is one step closer to becoming a reality. Durham County Commissioners approved the extension of the Durham-Orange Light Rail Transit project to include the university. Officials will continue to get public input throughout the rest of the year. Construction is set to begin in a few years, with completion by 2028.
  • Voters Decide: In Durham County bond issues to fund improvements to the public schools, community college, library and Museum of Life and Science will provide modernization of community facilities.

Orange County:

  • On Election Day, Orange County registered voters will have the opportunity to vote for or against two bond referenda: $120 million to fund the repair and renovation of safety and security features, as well as infrastructure in schools, and $5 million to create 1,000 affordable housing units for rental and ownership throughout the county.
  • Enabling legislation in 1987 gave Orange County the authority to enact School Impact Fees in 1993. The County is looking at updating the school impact fee calculated formula. The County is also looking at revising their ordinance to collect impact fees based on the type and size of housing units. The draft maximum impact fees range from $623/per age-restricted dwelling to $10,388 for
    3-bedroom multifamily dwellings. The full report can be found here: http://www.orangecountync.gov/departments/planning_and_inspections/current_interest_projects.php
  • Orange County property owners have until Nov. 3, 2016, to appeal to the North Carolina Property Tax Commission on the schedule of rules, standards and values adopted by the Board of County Commissioners on Oct. 4. The board adopted the order as part of its process to reappraise the value of real property in Orange County. North Carolina statutes require county governments to reappraise real property at least once every eight years. The appraisal adjusts values to ensure that all property owners are being taxed at fair market value. Orange County’s last appraisal took effect January 2009. The schedules are available for public viewing at the Orange County Tax Office (228 S. Churton Street, Hillsborough); Clerk to the Board of Commissioners (200 S. Cameron Street, Hillsborough); all Orange County Public Libraries, the Chapel Hill Public Library, and on the Orange County website (www.orangecountync.gov/departments/tax/revaluation.php).

Wake County:

  • Voters Decide: In Wake County voters will have the opportunity to vote for or against a half-percent local sales tax, to be used to fund a modern transportation system that will relieve road congestion, triple bus service and expand it to serve more communities. It also includes a commuter rail line to run from Garner to Durham with several stops in between.  The Triangle Community Coalition has endorsed the referendum.
  • Fitch Ratings has assigned a 'AAA' rating to Wake County general obligation bonds (GOs). The county's historical operating performance is resilient. Reserves remained ample during and after the recession. Given the county's revenue and expenditure flexibility and strong reserves, the rating agency predicts that the county is poised to perform exceptionally well in an economic downturn.

Apex:

  • Apex hopes to add multi-use paths alongside existing roads to help people get around town while also extending dedicated greenways to connect Apex to larger greenway corridors that allow for movement between Apex, Cary, Durham, and beyond.
  • A map showing the current 2030 Land Use Map and two sets of proposed amendments can be inspected at the Apex Town Hall or call 919‐249‐3426, Department of Planning and Community Development for further information. The two sets of proposed amendments can also be viewed online: http://www.apexnc.org/1012/2035‐Land‐Use‐Plan‐Update.

Cary:

  • Formal adoption of the Eastern Cary Gateway Special Area Plan started with a Town Council Public Hearing which was held on September 20. There was another Public Hearing at the Planning and Zoning Board meeting on October 17.  The Special Area Plan will return to the November 10 Regular Town Council Meeting for a vote for adoption.
  • Councilmember Robinson brought forward the idea of starting an award for quality building and design in Cary that showed going above and beyond what the town asks of developers. The idea was seconded by Mayor Harold Weinbrecht.
  • Reports keep rolling in about the high standards of living and business opportunities in Cary. But one of the biggest accolades comes from an FBI report which shows Cary is the safest town of its population size in the country.
  • For FY2018 budget, the public comment period will occur in December. Comments received in December will be summarized in a report for consideration. Moving this comment period from October to December will allow staff time to reflect on what was discussed at the Council’s mini-retreat.

·         Round 35 LDO Amendment – Public hearing on revising sign ordinance.

·         Round 36 LDO Amendment – The proposed Land Development Ordinance amendments would:
     A) allow staff action on development plans within the Central Transportation Zone regardless of size or the presence of a drive-through facility, provided the plan is not otherwise subject to action by Town Council or the Zoning Board of Adjustment; and
     B) maintain a conforming status for detached dwellings that would otherwise be made non-conforming
by dedication of additional right-of-way for existing streets.

Chapel Hill:

  • It looks like Wegmans is coming to Chapel Hill after the Council unanimously approved an agreement with Orange County. The county would give Wegmans a $4 million incentive over five years; Chapel Hill has agreed to reimburse the county for half of that incentive, $2 million. Wegmans likely wouldn’t open in Chapel Hill until around 2019.
  • The Town Council voted 5-3 to advance a plan for affordable housing at the Carraway Village project north of town and to help pay for $4.2 million in Eubanks Road improvements.

Durham (City):

  • The Durham City Council approved an economic incentive payment of up to $77,000 for contract development and manufacturing services company Almac Group to expand in the Bull City. Almac, which serves biopharmaceuticals and biotechnology companies, plans to grow its Durham operation on Technology Drive, near Lowe’s off Roxboro Road in northern Durham.
  • Fee corrections. City Ordinance #14750, adopted on May 18, 2015, established sewer connection fees in the Southeast Service Area, and provided for a 5% annual increase effective July 1 of each year beginning in 2016. City Ordinance #14924 updated water and sewer capital facility fees for FY2016-2017. This proposed amendment will adjust the Southeast Service Area fees to the calculated amount of the previously authorized annual increase. In addition, the proposed amendment will also clarify a minor typographical error in the total for the 5/8” meter. The sum of new water ($1,780) plus new sewer ($1,080) facility fees should be $2,860.

Fuquay Varina

  • A large, week-long series of meetings, called a charrette, will be held all day, Oct. 31-Nov. 4 at the Town's Public Service Center, located at 1415 Holland Road. The public is invited to attend any or all portions of
    the charrette. The goal of the week-long charrette is to allow the community and Town Staff to work through planning issues, include varying viewpoints and promote joint ownership of solutions in development of our new plan, called the 2035 Community Vision Land Use Plan. All of the information during the charrette will be used as a guide to develop the 2035 Community Vision Land Use Plan, by addressing general and specific topics, ranging from transportation to economic vitality. 

    We ask that you join in any meetings for topics you're particularly interested in. And of course, stop by at any time to join Town Staff in working on the plan. 

    http://campaign.r20.constantcontact.com/

 Garner:

  • Town officials will host a series of public meetings to gather public input and answer questions about their plans to expand the town’s planning jurisdiction by nearly 6,700 acres. The request covers an area roughly 9.7 square miles in size and includes chunks of property to the south, east and west of the town’s current borders.
  • The Town Council earlier this month approved the 304-unit Evolve at Timber Creek apartment complex,
    to be located on 22 acres at 1623 Benson Road. The complex will offer one, two, and three-bedroom units. Rent is expected to be between $900 and $1,300.
  • Town of Garner elected officials, staff and dignitaries broke ground Oct. 19 on the Garner Recreation Center, to be located at the corner of Main and Montague streets in historic downtown Garner. The nearly 40,000-square-foot facility will include a gymnasium with three regulation-size high school basketball courts, a raised, indoor exercise/walking track, aerobics/fitness, art and multipurpose rooms and administrative offices for Parks, Recreation and Cultural Resources staff. The budget for the project is approximately $8.8 million. It is expected to be completed by the end of 2017. Clark, Patterson, Lee of Raleigh designed the center, and Kimley Horn was chosen as civil and structural engineer. Pro Construction of Jacksonville is the general contractor for the project.

Holly Springs:

  • Plans for additional buildings in the Sunset Lake Commons Shopping Center and numerous road improvements to be constructed by the developer moved forward at the Holly Springs Town Council’s Sept. 20 meeting. At the meeting, the council approved plans for two buildings totaling 52,831 square feet along Sunset Lake Road, just south of the existing Harris Teeter. With construction of the project, the developer will widen a portion of Sunset Lake Road, lengthen the turn lane for vehicles on Sunset Lake Road turning left onto Holly Springs Road, and provide a new intersection with a traffic signal on Sunset Lake Road for vehicles entering and exiting the shopping center area. The developer also will build a portion of a loop road that, after other segments are constructed, will connect Lockley and Lassiter roads, circling the intersection of Sunset Lake and Holly Springs roads.
  • The council also approved a contract for completing design and permitting of a regional stormwater treatment area downtown. In a supporting document, staff said the regional stormwater treatment device “is expected to provide the desired spark to downtown development by providing stormwater treatment for over 20 acres.” Stormwater treatment is a federally mandated requirement, and the regional treatment area will satisfy that requirement for numerous developable properties downtown. In addition to stormwater treatment, the project will include sidewalks, road widening, a stage, seating areas, lighting and landscaping. Click here for additional details.  http://www.hollyspringsnc.us/DocumentCenter/View/513   
  • The council approved rezoning 11.7 acres on Sunset Lake Road to allow for low intensity businesses and multifamily development, promoting an urban village atmosphere. The council also approved rezoning 1.88 acres on Circle Drive and 1.97 acres on both Alford Street and West Holly Springs Road to local business. All rezonings were found to be consistent with the town's Comprehensive Plan.

Morrisville:

  • As Morrisville and Wake County grow, new successes produce their own problems and the yearly “State of Morrisville” meeting addressed both sides of the town’s growth, focusing on how a booming population means a greater need for schools and public transportation.
  • While Morrisville previously had an AAA rating from one of the ratings agencies, now all three agencies (Moody’s, S&P and Fitch) have given Morrisville the top rating. Morrisville is the smallest municipality in North Carolina with a AAA rating from all three agencies.
  • UDO Text Amendment (AMN 16-01): Amendment of Unified Development Ordinance Articles 6 & 7 (Riparian Buffers & Stormwater Management). Contact Robert Patterson at 919-463-6216 or rpatterson@townofmorrisville.org for additional information. 

Raleigh:

  • A developer wants to build a multi-family housing project that would connect Hillsborough Street to Cameron Village. Texas-based Leon Capital Group, which has an office in Charlotte, paid an estimated $11.6 million last week for a patchwork of properties totaling about 4 acres on Maiden Lane and Enterprise Street.
  • Public Hearings, November 1, 2016, 7:00 p.m.
    • Paving AR 941 and 941-A (outside city limits); Sidewalk AR 419 and 419-A (outside city limits) - Falls of Neuse Road Widening and Realignment Phase I (PW 2010-3) (Continued from 10/4/16 meeting)
    • Paving AR 946 and 946-A (outside city limits); Sidewalk AR 423 and 423-A (outside city limits) - Jones Sausage Road Widening and Realignment/Rock Quarry Road Part B (PW 2010-5) (Continued from 10/4/16 meeting)
    • Paving AR 947 and 947-A (outside city limits); Sidewalk AR 424 and 424-A (outside city limits) - Falls of Neuse Road Widening and Realignment Phase II (PW 2010-7) (Continued from 10/4/16 meeting)
    • STC-04-2016 - McDowell Street Alley
    • Z-14-16 - ACC Boulevard
    • Z-16-16 - Cypress Club Drive
    • Z-19-16 - Falls of Neuse Road
    • Z-20-16 - Jeffreys Grove School Road and Creedmoor Road
    • TC-2-16 - Stormwater Exemptions
  • Public Hearing, December 6, 2016, 7:00 p.m.
    • Z-26-16 - Multiple Properties between North Market and North Ridge Drive.
       

A Special Thank You to Our 2016 Members and Sponsors!

Strategic Members:  Raleigh Regional Association of REALTORS®   
HBA Raleigh-Wake County

Partner Members:  Smith Moore Leatherwood   Colliers International   Smith Anderson  
Taylor Wiseman & Taylor   Triangle Apartment Association


Business Members:  Bass Nixon & Kennedy   Bohler Engineering   CalAtlantic   Community Properties   Duke Energy   Fern Hill Properties   Fonville Morisey Barefoot   Gaines & Co.  Grubb Ventures   JPM South Development   Kane Realty Corporation   K&L Gates   Kimley-Horn & Associates  Lennar  M/I Homes   McAdams   Morningstar Law Group   Paragon Commercial Bank  Pulte Group  Robuck Homes  
Sepi Engineering   Williams Property Group  Withers & Ravenel   Woodfield Investments


Chamber/Gov:  Cary Chamber of Commerce    Morrisville Chamber of Commerce  
Durham Regional Association of REALTORS®      Raleigh Chamber of Commerce   Midtown Raleigh Alliance              


Sponsor Members:  Allen Tate Company   Northwood Ravin  Sheetz  
&  Woodfield Investments, LLC           

TCC News Alert: Raleigh - New Stormwater Regulations for Smaller Sites

An amendment to the City of Raleigh’s Unified Development Ordinance (UDO) has gone into effect and will now incorporate stormwater regulation standards for smaller sites undergoing development or redevelopment that were previously exempt.

With this ordinance change, Development of previously exempt lots used for single family/duplex dwelling, single family/duplex subdivisions of less than one acre or less than half an acre used for
any other purpose that exceed new impervious area limits are required to provide an evaluation to determine how development will impact stormwater downstream. These sites are now subject to maximum impervious surface limitations based on zoning district.

The purpose of the new requirement is to ensure waterways remain healthy and that there is reduced flooding in areas during and following construction. City staff is dedicated to helping you navigate this change and the potential impact it will have on your development plans.

A copy of the ordinance can be found on the City of Raleigh website: raleighnc.gov.

If you have any questions about the amended ordinance, please call 919-996-3940 or
e-mail: 
RaleighStormwater@raleighnc.gov.

TCC "in the KNOW" September 2016

September 2016 Updates

Statewide:

Regional:

  • Nineteen months after announcing that Google Fiber would be bringing gigabit fiber to portions of North Carolina, the company has announced that sign-ups are live in a limited portion of "the Triangle." According to the Google Fiber website, sign-ups are now live for residents of Morrisville, North Carolina, with additional community sign ups expected to go live in the coming months. As elsewhere, users will have the option of 100 Mbps connections for $50 or gigabit connections for $70. Gigabit lines & TV will cost $140, $10 more than earlier markets. The full deployment of Google Fiber throughout the Triangle is expected to take years. More detail can be found at the Google Fiber website. Users may also want to peruse the Google Fiber apartment availability tool.

Durham County:

  • Durham County leaders are moving forward with a plan to establish public-private partnerships to build two downtown parking decks that would include affordable housing and retail space. County commissioners unanimously voted to request qualifications from companies interested in partnering with the county to build the mixed-use projects on the 300 and 500 blocks of East Main Street.

Orange County:

  • The Orange County Board of Commissioners has started defining the priorities of a comprehensive plan to address millions of dollars in affordable-housing needs. The data shows 7,629 households earning up to 30 percent of the area median income (AMI) – roughly $21,600 for a family of four in Chapel Hill – are spending between 30 percent and 50 percent of their annual income on housing. Those conversations have resulted in a few collaborations so far, she said, but there are a multiple options, from building new public housing to banking land and installing utilities so nonprofit or for-profit partners can build traditional, tiny home and mobile home communities. County staff will bring back more concrete options for the commissioners to discuss at a future meeting.

Apex:

  • Apex’s planning board recommended approval for a change in the town code that will give the developers of the long-awaited Veridea project more power to make adjustments to the project as majority property owners.
  • Town Council - Public Hearings

o   September 6, 2016 Agenda- Unified Development Ordinance (UDO) Amendments

o   September 20, 2016 Agenda

§  Rezoning Case #16CZ17 Villages of Apex PUD Amendment

§  Rezoning Case #16CZ18 Old Mill Village PUD Amendment

§  Unified Development Ordinance (UDO) Amendments

§  2030 Land Use Map Amendment

§  Transportation Plan Amendment

o   October 4, 2016 Agenda

§  Rezoning Case #16CZ22 2500 Creekside Landing Drive

§  Special Use Permit Elite Waste Services

Carrboro:

  • While it may look like a stalled project, there’s a lot going on behind the scenes at South Green, a new retail development on South Greensboro Street in Carrboro. The proposal for South Green was approved by the Carrboro Board of Aldermen in June 2015 and is expected to be completed between October 2018 and April 2019. The owner, Woodhill NC, LLC, can’t continue construction on the site due to a project by the N.C. Department of Transportation, but is working to secure tenants for the shopping center.

Cary:

  • The future downtown library and 350-space parking deck near the corner of Walnut Street and Kildaire Farm Road is expected to cost the town $1.2 million more after the Town Council approved the project’s schematics. This additional cost includes $600,000 for integrated public art on the north side of the deck and the northwest stair area, as well as $630,000 for upgrades to the library’s lower level, including shell space and restrooms.
  • Staff presented a summary of feedback on the Cary Community Plan. Additionally, staff will present a summary of outstanding issues and recommended modifications prior to the public hearing. Examples of how the proposed plan policies will be utilized in guiding future rezoning and development decisions will be included. The Cary Community Plan is on schedule to be adopted by January 2017.
  • Formal adoption of the Eastern Cary Gateway Special Area Plan starts with a scheduled Town Council Public Hearing was held on September 20. There will be another Public Hearing at the Planning and Zoning Board meeting on October 17 before being scheduled to return to the November 10 Regular Town Council Meeting for a vote for adoption

Chapel Hill:

  • Chapel Hill local government has various standing boards and commissions that advise the Town Council on a wide range of issues. For more information on the work of these groups, eligibility requirements, or to complete an application form, please visit www.townofchapelhill.org/boards. Currently looking to fill vacancies on the following:
    • Grievance Hearing Board: 3 Town Resident
    • Cemeteries Advisory Board: 2 town residents
    • Environmental Stewardship Advisory Board: 1 Greenways Advocate, 1 Town resident, 1 UNC Chapel Hill Student
    • Transportation and Connectivity Advisory Board: 1 Town resident, 1 UNC Chapel Hill Student
    • Board of Adjustment: 3 Orange County appointed positions
    • Planning Commission: 1 Orange County appointed ETJ, 1 Orange County appointed JPA, ETJ or Chapel Hill resident can be appointed to position within terms of Joint planning agreement.
    • Historic District Commission: 1 resident within the Town’s planning jurisdiction (Town or ETJ)
    • Housing Advisory Board: 1 For-profit Developer
    • Library Board of Trustees: 1 Town resident
    • Community Design Commission; 1 Town resident
    • Community Policing Advisory board: 1
    • Human Services Advisory Board: 1 Town resident
    • Justice in Action Committee: 1 member


  • American Legion Concept Plan: The proposed development bringing commercial space, apartments and a larger park space to the 36-acre Legion Property on Legion Drive in Chapel Hill has been a hot-button topic since early 2016. The concept plan put forward by Woodfield Investments calls for a maximum of 400 apartment units on the property along with commercial space and enhancing the current park designated on the Ephesus-Church side of the property.

Durham (City):

  • The Durham City Council voted four to three to move forward with the “Golden Belt” Historical District with Mayor Bill Bell, Council members Cora Cole-McFadden and Eddie Davis voting no. Opposition to the designation by Durham Rescue Mission and others was due to more restrictive codes in the district.
  • The Durham City Council will hold a public hearing on Monday November 16, 2015 at 7:00 PM and will consider an Ordinance to Update Hydrant Rental Deposit Fees. To speak at the hearing, fill in the form provided by the City Clerk at the meeting. The hearing will be in Council Chambers in City Hall, 101 City Hall Plaza, Durham, NC. Charges for Hydrant Meter Deposits and Rental Rates are authorized by the City Code, Article II, Sections 70-23 and 70-49(4).
    • Proposed changes are as follows. Meter Size Deposit 5/8”= $600      3”= $3,700

If approved by City Council, the ordinance will be effective on December 1, 2015 If you wish to submit written comments to be read by City staff, you may send them via email to newwaterrates@durhamnc.gov or via USPS to Department of Water Management, 101 City Hall Plaza, Durham, NC, 27701.

  • The proposed fee corrections will be on the agenda for these meetings: Work Session, which begins at 1:00 PM on Thursday September 22, 2016; and Monday night meeting, which begins at 7:00 p.m. on October 3, 2016. Both meetings will be in the Durham City Hall, 101 City Hall Plaza, Durham, NC 27701. If you wish to submit written comments to be read by City staff, you may send them via email to newwaterrates@durhamnc.gov or via USPS to Department of Water Management, 101 City Hall Plaza, Durham, NC, 27701. To speak at either event, fill in the form provided by the City Clerk at the meeting. City Ordinance #14750, adopted on May 18, 2015, established sewer connection fees in the Southeast Service Area, and provided for a 5% annual increase effective July 1 of each year beginning in 2016. City Ordinance #14924 updated water and sewer capital facility fees for FY 2016-2017. This proposed amendment will adjust the Southeast Service Area fees to the calculated amount of the previously authorized annual increase. In addition, the proposed amendment will also clarify a minor typographical error in the total for the 5/8” meter. The sum of new water ($1,780) plus new sewer ($1,080) facility fees should be $2,860. If approved by City Council, the ordinance amending capital facility fees will go into effect on October 3, 2016. Citizens interested in addressing Council are encouraged to review the City’s guidelines on citizens’ matters and participation page at https://durhamnc.gov/1345/Citizen-ParticipationRequest-to-Appear.

Hillsborough:

  • Less than four months after fire ripped through an abandoned textile mill in Hillsborough, construction has started to transform the old mill into trendy loft-style apartments.

Holly Springs:

  • A Comprehensive Plan Amendment filed by Spaulding and Norris to and to change the future land use designation of 11.709 acres from Residential to Very High-Density Mixed-Use. The property is located at 4737 Sunset Lake Road. A public hearing was held on September 20.

Knightdale:

  • The Town Council on Tuesday, Sept. 6, held a public hearing on the change and voted unanimously to refer the matter to the Land Use Review Board’s Sept 12 meeting for a recommendation. Currently apartment complexes are a permitted use in several residential and mixed-use zoning districts. The town staff proposes to change this to require a special use permit, which would require a site-specific development plan and a public process.

Raleigh:

  • Kane Realty, which developed the thriving North Hills community off of Six Forks Road, plans to buy or lease a total of 34 acres extending east toward Wake Forest Road. The move, along with a different developer’s plan for about 21 acres, would more than double North Hills’ footprint on the east side of Six Forks. Developer John Kane says he wants to create more offices, apartments and retail space along the Interstate 440 Beltline from St. Albans Drive near Wake Forest Road.


TCC: Registration is open for the TCC Luncheon Learn on Friday, October 7th

GoWake GoTransit GoVote!

11:30 a.m. to 1:00 pm. at 111 Realtors Way in Cary.

Come learn about the referendum on the November ballot that will help fund expanded transit service throughout the Triangle. The TCC has partnered with WakeUP Wake County to presentan in-depth panel discussion featuring:

John Kane , CEO, Kane Realty
Mary Ann Baldwin, Councilperson, City of Raleigh
Asa Fleming, Raleigh Regional Association of REALTORS®    
         

Moderator:  Karen Rindge, Executive Director, WakeUP Wake County

Event Sponsor: Allen Tate Company         
REGISTER AT WWW.TRICC.ORG

 

Save the Date!  November 16, 2016 November Election Recap
featuring keynote speakers:

Chris Sinclair, Cornerstone Solutions
Brad Crone, Campaign Connections
Joe Stewart, NC FreeEnterprise Foundation

Register at www.tricc.org

A Special Thank You to Our 2016 Members and Sponsors! 

Strategic Members:  Raleigh Regional Association of REALTORS®   
HBA Raleigh-Wake County


Partner Members:  Smith Moore Leatherwood   Colliers International   Smith Anderson  Taylor Wiseman & Taylor   Triangle Apartment Association

Business Members:  Bass Nixon & Kennedy   Bohler Engineering   CalAtlantic   Community Properties   Duke Energy   Fern Hill Properties   Fonville Morisey Barefoot   Gaines & Co.  Grubb Ventures   JPM South Development   Kane Realty Corporation   K&L Gates   Kimley-Horn & Associates  Lennar  M/I Homes   McAdams   Morningstar Law Group   Paragon Commercial Bank  Pulte Group  Robuck Homes   Sepi Engineering   Williams Property Group  Withers & Ravenel   Woodfield Investments

Chamber/Gov:  Cary Chamber of Commerce    Morrisville Chamber of Commerce   Durham Regional Association of REALTORS®      Raleigh Chamber of Commerce   Midtown Raleigh Alliance              

Sponsor Members:  Allen Tate Company   Northwood Ravin  Sheetz  
&  Woodfield Investments, LLC