TCC "in the KNOW" November 2016

  • November 2016 Updates

Nationwide:

  • Small business owners are rushing to get their companies – and their employees – ready for an upcoming change in overtime rules. With federal regulations that are expected to affect the paychecks of 4.2 million workers going into effect Dec. 1, human resources consultants say they’re seeing a surge in calls from owners seeking help in complying. Many business owners have procrastinated, hoping Congress might put the regulations on hold or a federal court would take a similar step in response to a lawsuit filed by a coalition of 21 states. But with just weeks until regulation goes into effect, there’s no indication owners will get a reprieve.

Statewide:

  • Top North Carolina lawmakers insist they have no plans to expand the state's Supreme Court by two seats in an effort to reclaim a majority for conservative justices, never mind a drumbeat of speculation around Raleigh and beyond.

  • North Carolina lawmakers are considering changes to the way public schools are funded after a study found that the state's current funding model is too complex, lacks transparency and accountability and at times favors wealthier counties. The study, compiled by the General Assembly's Program Evaluation Division, was presented to a joint legislative committee.

  • For the second consecutive year, North Carolina is the nation’s No. 2 best state for business according to Forbes magazine. Forbes' annual “Best States for Business” list measures which states have the best business climates and are poised to succeed going forward. North Carolina is the only state in the southeast to be ranked in the top five.

Durham County:

  • Durham County elections board is dismissing a GOP lawyer’s bid to recount 94,000 votes. The board voted unanimously that the protest lacked evidence. The three board members spent two hours listening to witnesses and decided a software glitch that blocked votes from being uploaded to the statewide tally didn’t have anything to do with accurately logging votes. Orange, Wake and Halifax counties also rejected election protests.

Orange County:

  • Orange County leaders recently learned they face some tough questions about a $250 million funding gap for the now-$1.87 billion Durham-Orange light-rail project and a December deadline to move ahead. The funding gap is expected to emerge by 2028 because of changes to state and federal funding, GoTriangle representatives told county, Chapel Hill, Carrboro and Hillsborough officials at the Assembly of Governments meeting.

  • Orange County Current Planning Staff invites mobile home park owners and other interested parties to meet with Staff to discuss and collaborate on potential revisions to its regulations on Mobile Home Park Conditional Zoning Districts to allow for temporary residential units. For more information.

Wake County:

  • Wake County voters opted for a half-cent increase to the local sales tax rate to help fund an expansion of public bus and train services. The measure passed with a 53 percent favor, according to unofficial results.

  • In April, the Orange Route was selected as the preferred path for the project. The 30-mile path will connect the 540 Outer Loop east from Holly Springs to Interstate 40 south of Garner, and then to Knightdale.

Apex:

  • Promising a “mini North Hills” for Apex, the developers of the Sweetwater neighborhood returned to the Apex Town Council to ask for permission to build 230 apartments above the ground-level retail and office space initially planned for the area. The 4-1 vote in favor of that request, with Mayor pro tem Nicole Dozier dissenting, was Apex’s first to allow the construction of what’s called vertical mixed-use development, which combines residential and commercial tenants in the same building. Sweetwater is a 165-acre, mixed-use development on the south side of U.S. 64 in west Apex designed by Triangle-based ExperienceOne Homes. This portion of the development will be managed by the Kalikow Group, a New York-based real estate investment firm. 

Cary:

  • A Raleigh builder who wants to develop about 40 townhomes near Green Hope High School plans to submit conditions to the town that he hopes will make the project more desirable to the council and the project’s neighbors. On Thursday, Nov. 11, the council unanimously voted to table the case again to the Dec. 8 meeting to give the applicant more time to submit conditions that will give them a better idea of how the project would look and feel.

  • The council approved the comprehensive plan amendment and rezoning of about 15 acres near 844 East Chatham St., west of WakeMed Soccer Park, to allow for multi-family housing.

  • Authorized the town manager to enter into an agreement with Cofounders Capital Management LLC to obtain consultant services to facilitate the growth and support for new business entities and support economic development in downtown Cary in exchange for the shared use of the third floor in The Cary Theater for an additional year.

  • Referred the Cary Community Plan to the town’s planning and zoning board with plans to hold a council work session in the coming weeks to review the comprehensive transportation plan that is part of the town’s 25-year vision.

  • Approved the Eastern Cary Gateway Special Planning Area, which covers about 800 acres bordered by Chapel Hill Road to the north, Interstate 40 to the east, Cary Towne Center to the south and Maynard Road to the west. The council decided to amend language in the plan that encourages development five to 15 stories in this area with the flexibility to have some three- to four-story structures.

Carrboro:

  • The Carrboro Board of Aldermen deliberated over an amendment that would alter the Land Use Ordinance by instituting a new policy for citizen comment. The amendment, which would remove the protest provision from local government, would require a supermajority vote by board members to act on any community petitions. The board held off on a decision, but will continue the discussion at a public hearing Dec. 17.

Chapel Hill:

  • The Council will hold public hearings to receive public comment on the rezoning of the Elkin Hills Neighborhood Conservation Zoning Overlay Districts and apply them to the Zoning Atlas. The Council will consider continuing the public hearings to the Council Business Meeting on Jan. 23, 2017.

  • The Council held a public hearing to consider a proposal to blend Land Use Management Ordinance (LUMO) Section 5.14 (Signs) and Section 3.11.4.4., the Ephesus-Fordham District Sign Standards, into one comprehensive sign ordinance. The public hearing was continued to Dec. 5, 2016. 

Holly Springs:

  • At its meeting Nov. 15, the Holly Springs Town Council approved plans for two subdivisions where the subdivision developers will build portions of connector roads planned for years on the Holly Springs Comprehensive Transportation Plan.

  • The council also approved a residential zoning change for seven acres at Bluffs Drive and Berman Edge Road adjacent to the Morgan Park subdivision.

  • The council approved a special exception use and development plan, allowing for the conversion of a vacant residence off S. Main Street into an office in downtown Holly Springs.

Knightdale:

  • The Town Council is considering an amendment to the Unified Development Ordinance that would modify maintenance requirements for stormwater infrastructure in subdivisions with active homeowner’s associations, putting more of the responsibility on the HOAs.

Morrisville:

  • The Town Council voted Nov. 7 to do away with a planned brick-and-mortar pool enclosure for the Morrisville Aquatics and Fitness Center in an effort to curb costs of an increasingly expensive renovation. Jerry Allen, the town’s director of parks, recreation and cultural resources, said the town could save about $1 million by forgoing a traditional roof and instead using a vinyl or glass-paneled dome to cover the pool. The pool is still slated to be expanded from four lanes to eight.

  • The Town of Morrisville is proposing to remove a portion of the Morrisville East Connector from Nova Drive to the planned McCrimmon Parkway Extension from the Transportation Plan. Contact Brad West 919-463-6926 or bwest@townofmorrisville.org for additional information.

  • Development Agreement (DEV 16-01): The Town of Morrisville and Ammons East Corporation (Wake Competition Center) are requesting to enter into a development agreement. The parcels are specifically identified as Wake County PIN 0756-41-0733. Contact Courtney Tanner at 919-463-6199 or ctanner@townofmorrisville.org for additional information.

Raleigh:

  • The city plans to finish construction on Union Station a year from now, and the downtown transportation hub will be operational in January 2018. City leaders need to approve a strategy for pursuing tenants, Union Station will have about 4,000 square feet of space to rent for retail or office use on its main level, 6,000 square feet on its lower level and 2,700 square feet on its upper level.

  • The Raleigh City Council on Nov. 1 approved an amendment to the Unified Development Ordinance (UDO) to incorporate stormwater regulation standards for smaller sites undergoing development or redevelopment that were previously exempt. With this revision, development of previously exempt lots less than one acre used for single family/duplex dwelling or less than half an acre used for any other purpose that exceed new impervious area limits are required to provide an evaluation to determine how development will impact stormwater downstream and identify the need for stormwater management. The policy change will take effect on Sunday, Nov. 27.

  • December 6, 2016, 7:00 p.m. Public Hearings:

    • Community Development Annual Action Plan

    • STC-05-2016 - Washington Terrace

    • Water AR 1353 - Craftsman Drive Improvements (PU 2013-1)

    • Water AR 1353-A - Craftsman Drive Improvements (PU 2013-1)

    • Sewer AR 1354 - Knollrock Drive Improvements (PU 2014-1)

    • Sewer AR 1355 - Coronado Drive Improvements (PU 2014-2)

    • Sewer AR 1356 - Pinecroft Drive Improvements (PU 2014-4)

    • Sidewalk Petition - Yadkin Drive

    • Z-15-16 - Falls of Neuse Road

    • Z-17-16 - Creedmoor Road Conditional Use District

    • Z-18-16 - Homewood Banks Drive

    • Z-21-16 - Lumley Road

    • Z-25-16 - Leesville Road

    • Z-26-16 - Multiple Properties between New Market Way and North Ridge Drive

    • TC-15-16 - Maximum Area Devoted to Limited Commercial Uses in RX and OX Districts

    • TC-16-16 - Dwelling Units in Congregate Care

    • TC-19-16 - Wall Signage.

TCC "in the KNOW" October 2016

October 2016 Updates 

As we look forward to 2017, we see challenges and opportunities.  The upcoming state and national elections will directly affect business in the Triangle.  As the topic of growth and transit are central to discussions surrounding the elections, we can expect continued swings in political and policy ideologies.   

Your role in supporting the Triangle Community Coalition’s mission of promoting public policy that balances economic development and growth has been critical to our success.  Through our Coffee Chats, Luncheon Learn programs, surveys, publications, and advocacy, we have proactively provided our members with valuable information surrounding the topics of land use, property rights, and growth in the Triangle.

The TCC is needed now more than ever! 

The business and real estate communities need a strong voice to advocate for their business, and the TCC will persevere to be the leader in the growth conversation in the Triangle. In the coming year and years to follow, the TCC will continue to advance our approaches to influence policy to meet the ever-changing needs within the business community.  We have an exciting year planned for 2017!  Our focus will be to advocate for balanced growth by strengthening our partnerships and relationships in the community that will offer better opportunities and outcomes for our members.

Now is the time to strengthen our resolve and commitment!  The TCC looks forward to the challenges ahead and the opportunity to advocate for you and your business.To renew or join the TCC, please visit our website to download your membership form today at www.tricc.org

 Statewide:

  • Early voting in Orange, Durham, Wake and Johnston Counties began on October 20. The General Election will be held on Tuesday, November 8. Get out and vote!
  • The state is still recovering from Hurricane Matthew which caused $1.5 billion in property damage to 100,000 buildings, left 900,000 without power, killed at least 26 people and caused environmental problems.

Durham County:

  • A light rail stop at North Carolina Central is one step closer to becoming a reality. Durham County Commissioners approved the extension of the Durham-Orange Light Rail Transit project to include the university. Officials will continue to get public input throughout the rest of the year. Construction is set to begin in a few years, with completion by 2028.
  • Voters Decide: In Durham County bond issues to fund improvements to the public schools, community college, library and Museum of Life and Science will provide modernization of community facilities.

Orange County:

  • On Election Day, Orange County registered voters will have the opportunity to vote for or against two bond referenda: $120 million to fund the repair and renovation of safety and security features, as well as infrastructure in schools, and $5 million to create 1,000 affordable housing units for rental and ownership throughout the county.
  • Enabling legislation in 1987 gave Orange County the authority to enact School Impact Fees in 1993. The County is looking at updating the school impact fee calculated formula. The County is also looking at revising their ordinance to collect impact fees based on the type and size of housing units. The draft maximum impact fees range from $623/per age-restricted dwelling to $10,388 for
    3-bedroom multifamily dwellings. The full report can be found here: http://www.orangecountync.gov/departments/planning_and_inspections/current_interest_projects.php
  • Orange County property owners have until Nov. 3, 2016, to appeal to the North Carolina Property Tax Commission on the schedule of rules, standards and values adopted by the Board of County Commissioners on Oct. 4. The board adopted the order as part of its process to reappraise the value of real property in Orange County. North Carolina statutes require county governments to reappraise real property at least once every eight years. The appraisal adjusts values to ensure that all property owners are being taxed at fair market value. Orange County’s last appraisal took effect January 2009. The schedules are available for public viewing at the Orange County Tax Office (228 S. Churton Street, Hillsborough); Clerk to the Board of Commissioners (200 S. Cameron Street, Hillsborough); all Orange County Public Libraries, the Chapel Hill Public Library, and on the Orange County website (www.orangecountync.gov/departments/tax/revaluation.php).

Wake County:

  • Voters Decide: In Wake County voters will have the opportunity to vote for or against a half-percent local sales tax, to be used to fund a modern transportation system that will relieve road congestion, triple bus service and expand it to serve more communities. It also includes a commuter rail line to run from Garner to Durham with several stops in between.  The Triangle Community Coalition has endorsed the referendum.
  • Fitch Ratings has assigned a 'AAA' rating to Wake County general obligation bonds (GOs). The county's historical operating performance is resilient. Reserves remained ample during and after the recession. Given the county's revenue and expenditure flexibility and strong reserves, the rating agency predicts that the county is poised to perform exceptionally well in an economic downturn.

Apex:

  • Apex hopes to add multi-use paths alongside existing roads to help people get around town while also extending dedicated greenways to connect Apex to larger greenway corridors that allow for movement between Apex, Cary, Durham, and beyond.
  • A map showing the current 2030 Land Use Map and two sets of proposed amendments can be inspected at the Apex Town Hall or call 919‐249‐3426, Department of Planning and Community Development for further information. The two sets of proposed amendments can also be viewed online: http://www.apexnc.org/1012/2035‐Land‐Use‐Plan‐Update.

Cary:

  • Formal adoption of the Eastern Cary Gateway Special Area Plan started with a Town Council Public Hearing which was held on September 20. There was another Public Hearing at the Planning and Zoning Board meeting on October 17.  The Special Area Plan will return to the November 10 Regular Town Council Meeting for a vote for adoption.
  • Councilmember Robinson brought forward the idea of starting an award for quality building and design in Cary that showed going above and beyond what the town asks of developers. The idea was seconded by Mayor Harold Weinbrecht.
  • Reports keep rolling in about the high standards of living and business opportunities in Cary. But one of the biggest accolades comes from an FBI report which shows Cary is the safest town of its population size in the country.
  • For FY2018 budget, the public comment period will occur in December. Comments received in December will be summarized in a report for consideration. Moving this comment period from October to December will allow staff time to reflect on what was discussed at the Council’s mini-retreat.

·         Round 35 LDO Amendment – Public hearing on revising sign ordinance.

·         Round 36 LDO Amendment – The proposed Land Development Ordinance amendments would:
     A) allow staff action on development plans within the Central Transportation Zone regardless of size or the presence of a drive-through facility, provided the plan is not otherwise subject to action by Town Council or the Zoning Board of Adjustment; and
     B) maintain a conforming status for detached dwellings that would otherwise be made non-conforming
by dedication of additional right-of-way for existing streets.

Chapel Hill:

  • It looks like Wegmans is coming to Chapel Hill after the Council unanimously approved an agreement with Orange County. The county would give Wegmans a $4 million incentive over five years; Chapel Hill has agreed to reimburse the county for half of that incentive, $2 million. Wegmans likely wouldn’t open in Chapel Hill until around 2019.
  • The Town Council voted 5-3 to advance a plan for affordable housing at the Carraway Village project north of town and to help pay for $4.2 million in Eubanks Road improvements.

Durham (City):

  • The Durham City Council approved an economic incentive payment of up to $77,000 for contract development and manufacturing services company Almac Group to expand in the Bull City. Almac, which serves biopharmaceuticals and biotechnology companies, plans to grow its Durham operation on Technology Drive, near Lowe’s off Roxboro Road in northern Durham.
  • Fee corrections. City Ordinance #14750, adopted on May 18, 2015, established sewer connection fees in the Southeast Service Area, and provided for a 5% annual increase effective July 1 of each year beginning in 2016. City Ordinance #14924 updated water and sewer capital facility fees for FY2016-2017. This proposed amendment will adjust the Southeast Service Area fees to the calculated amount of the previously authorized annual increase. In addition, the proposed amendment will also clarify a minor typographical error in the total for the 5/8” meter. The sum of new water ($1,780) plus new sewer ($1,080) facility fees should be $2,860.

Fuquay Varina

  • A large, week-long series of meetings, called a charrette, will be held all day, Oct. 31-Nov. 4 at the Town's Public Service Center, located at 1415 Holland Road. The public is invited to attend any or all portions of
    the charrette. The goal of the week-long charrette is to allow the community and Town Staff to work through planning issues, include varying viewpoints and promote joint ownership of solutions in development of our new plan, called the 2035 Community Vision Land Use Plan. All of the information during the charrette will be used as a guide to develop the 2035 Community Vision Land Use Plan, by addressing general and specific topics, ranging from transportation to economic vitality. 

    We ask that you join in any meetings for topics you're particularly interested in. And of course, stop by at any time to join Town Staff in working on the plan. 

    http://campaign.r20.constantcontact.com/

 Garner:

  • Town officials will host a series of public meetings to gather public input and answer questions about their plans to expand the town’s planning jurisdiction by nearly 6,700 acres. The request covers an area roughly 9.7 square miles in size and includes chunks of property to the south, east and west of the town’s current borders.
  • The Town Council earlier this month approved the 304-unit Evolve at Timber Creek apartment complex,
    to be located on 22 acres at 1623 Benson Road. The complex will offer one, two, and three-bedroom units. Rent is expected to be between $900 and $1,300.
  • Town of Garner elected officials, staff and dignitaries broke ground Oct. 19 on the Garner Recreation Center, to be located at the corner of Main and Montague streets in historic downtown Garner. The nearly 40,000-square-foot facility will include a gymnasium with three regulation-size high school basketball courts, a raised, indoor exercise/walking track, aerobics/fitness, art and multipurpose rooms and administrative offices for Parks, Recreation and Cultural Resources staff. The budget for the project is approximately $8.8 million. It is expected to be completed by the end of 2017. Clark, Patterson, Lee of Raleigh designed the center, and Kimley Horn was chosen as civil and structural engineer. Pro Construction of Jacksonville is the general contractor for the project.

Holly Springs:

  • Plans for additional buildings in the Sunset Lake Commons Shopping Center and numerous road improvements to be constructed by the developer moved forward at the Holly Springs Town Council’s Sept. 20 meeting. At the meeting, the council approved plans for two buildings totaling 52,831 square feet along Sunset Lake Road, just south of the existing Harris Teeter. With construction of the project, the developer will widen a portion of Sunset Lake Road, lengthen the turn lane for vehicles on Sunset Lake Road turning left onto Holly Springs Road, and provide a new intersection with a traffic signal on Sunset Lake Road for vehicles entering and exiting the shopping center area. The developer also will build a portion of a loop road that, after other segments are constructed, will connect Lockley and Lassiter roads, circling the intersection of Sunset Lake and Holly Springs roads.
  • The council also approved a contract for completing design and permitting of a regional stormwater treatment area downtown. In a supporting document, staff said the regional stormwater treatment device “is expected to provide the desired spark to downtown development by providing stormwater treatment for over 20 acres.” Stormwater treatment is a federally mandated requirement, and the regional treatment area will satisfy that requirement for numerous developable properties downtown. In addition to stormwater treatment, the project will include sidewalks, road widening, a stage, seating areas, lighting and landscaping. Click here for additional details.  http://www.hollyspringsnc.us/DocumentCenter/View/513   
  • The council approved rezoning 11.7 acres on Sunset Lake Road to allow for low intensity businesses and multifamily development, promoting an urban village atmosphere. The council also approved rezoning 1.88 acres on Circle Drive and 1.97 acres on both Alford Street and West Holly Springs Road to local business. All rezonings were found to be consistent with the town's Comprehensive Plan.

Morrisville:

  • As Morrisville and Wake County grow, new successes produce their own problems and the yearly “State of Morrisville” meeting addressed both sides of the town’s growth, focusing on how a booming population means a greater need for schools and public transportation.
  • While Morrisville previously had an AAA rating from one of the ratings agencies, now all three agencies (Moody’s, S&P and Fitch) have given Morrisville the top rating. Morrisville is the smallest municipality in North Carolina with a AAA rating from all three agencies.
  • UDO Text Amendment (AMN 16-01): Amendment of Unified Development Ordinance Articles 6 & 7 (Riparian Buffers & Stormwater Management). Contact Robert Patterson at 919-463-6216 or rpatterson@townofmorrisville.org for additional information. 

Raleigh:

  • A developer wants to build a multi-family housing project that would connect Hillsborough Street to Cameron Village. Texas-based Leon Capital Group, which has an office in Charlotte, paid an estimated $11.6 million last week for a patchwork of properties totaling about 4 acres on Maiden Lane and Enterprise Street.
  • Public Hearings, November 1, 2016, 7:00 p.m.
    • Paving AR 941 and 941-A (outside city limits); Sidewalk AR 419 and 419-A (outside city limits) - Falls of Neuse Road Widening and Realignment Phase I (PW 2010-3) (Continued from 10/4/16 meeting)
    • Paving AR 946 and 946-A (outside city limits); Sidewalk AR 423 and 423-A (outside city limits) - Jones Sausage Road Widening and Realignment/Rock Quarry Road Part B (PW 2010-5) (Continued from 10/4/16 meeting)
    • Paving AR 947 and 947-A (outside city limits); Sidewalk AR 424 and 424-A (outside city limits) - Falls of Neuse Road Widening and Realignment Phase II (PW 2010-7) (Continued from 10/4/16 meeting)
    • STC-04-2016 - McDowell Street Alley
    • Z-14-16 - ACC Boulevard
    • Z-16-16 - Cypress Club Drive
    • Z-19-16 - Falls of Neuse Road
    • Z-20-16 - Jeffreys Grove School Road and Creedmoor Road
    • TC-2-16 - Stormwater Exemptions
  • Public Hearing, December 6, 2016, 7:00 p.m.
    • Z-26-16 - Multiple Properties between North Market and North Ridge Drive.
       

A Special Thank You to Our 2016 Members and Sponsors!

Strategic Members:  Raleigh Regional Association of REALTORS®   
HBA Raleigh-Wake County

Partner Members:  Smith Moore Leatherwood   Colliers International   Smith Anderson  
Taylor Wiseman & Taylor   Triangle Apartment Association


Business Members:  Bass Nixon & Kennedy   Bohler Engineering   CalAtlantic   Community Properties   Duke Energy   Fern Hill Properties   Fonville Morisey Barefoot   Gaines & Co.  Grubb Ventures   JPM South Development   Kane Realty Corporation   K&L Gates   Kimley-Horn & Associates  Lennar  M/I Homes   McAdams   Morningstar Law Group   Paragon Commercial Bank  Pulte Group  Robuck Homes  
Sepi Engineering   Williams Property Group  Withers & Ravenel   Woodfield Investments


Chamber/Gov:  Cary Chamber of Commerce    Morrisville Chamber of Commerce  
Durham Regional Association of REALTORS®      Raleigh Chamber of Commerce   Midtown Raleigh Alliance              


Sponsor Members:  Allen Tate Company   Northwood Ravin  Sheetz  
&  Woodfield Investments, LLC           

TCC News Alert: Raleigh - New Stormwater Regulations for Smaller Sites

An amendment to the City of Raleigh’s Unified Development Ordinance (UDO) has gone into effect and will now incorporate stormwater regulation standards for smaller sites undergoing development or redevelopment that were previously exempt.

With this ordinance change, Development of previously exempt lots used for single family/duplex dwelling, single family/duplex subdivisions of less than one acre or less than half an acre used for
any other purpose that exceed new impervious area limits are required to provide an evaluation to determine how development will impact stormwater downstream. These sites are now subject to maximum impervious surface limitations based on zoning district.

The purpose of the new requirement is to ensure waterways remain healthy and that there is reduced flooding in areas during and following construction. City staff is dedicated to helping you navigate this change and the potential impact it will have on your development plans.

A copy of the ordinance can be found on the City of Raleigh website: raleighnc.gov.

If you have any questions about the amended ordinance, please call 919-996-3940 or
e-mail: 
RaleighStormwater@raleighnc.gov.

TCC "in the KNOW" September 2016

September 2016 Updates

Statewide:

Regional:

  • Nineteen months after announcing that Google Fiber would be bringing gigabit fiber to portions of North Carolina, the company has announced that sign-ups are live in a limited portion of "the Triangle." According to the Google Fiber website, sign-ups are now live for residents of Morrisville, North Carolina, with additional community sign ups expected to go live in the coming months. As elsewhere, users will have the option of 100 Mbps connections for $50 or gigabit connections for $70. Gigabit lines & TV will cost $140, $10 more than earlier markets. The full deployment of Google Fiber throughout the Triangle is expected to take years. More detail can be found at the Google Fiber website. Users may also want to peruse the Google Fiber apartment availability tool.

Durham County:

  • Durham County leaders are moving forward with a plan to establish public-private partnerships to build two downtown parking decks that would include affordable housing and retail space. County commissioners unanimously voted to request qualifications from companies interested in partnering with the county to build the mixed-use projects on the 300 and 500 blocks of East Main Street.

Orange County:

  • The Orange County Board of Commissioners has started defining the priorities of a comprehensive plan to address millions of dollars in affordable-housing needs. The data shows 7,629 households earning up to 30 percent of the area median income (AMI) – roughly $21,600 for a family of four in Chapel Hill – are spending between 30 percent and 50 percent of their annual income on housing. Those conversations have resulted in a few collaborations so far, she said, but there are a multiple options, from building new public housing to banking land and installing utilities so nonprofit or for-profit partners can build traditional, tiny home and mobile home communities. County staff will bring back more concrete options for the commissioners to discuss at a future meeting.

Apex:

  • Apex’s planning board recommended approval for a change in the town code that will give the developers of the long-awaited Veridea project more power to make adjustments to the project as majority property owners.
  • Town Council - Public Hearings

o   September 6, 2016 Agenda- Unified Development Ordinance (UDO) Amendments

o   September 20, 2016 Agenda

§  Rezoning Case #16CZ17 Villages of Apex PUD Amendment

§  Rezoning Case #16CZ18 Old Mill Village PUD Amendment

§  Unified Development Ordinance (UDO) Amendments

§  2030 Land Use Map Amendment

§  Transportation Plan Amendment

o   October 4, 2016 Agenda

§  Rezoning Case #16CZ22 2500 Creekside Landing Drive

§  Special Use Permit Elite Waste Services

Carrboro:

  • While it may look like a stalled project, there’s a lot going on behind the scenes at South Green, a new retail development on South Greensboro Street in Carrboro. The proposal for South Green was approved by the Carrboro Board of Aldermen in June 2015 and is expected to be completed between October 2018 and April 2019. The owner, Woodhill NC, LLC, can’t continue construction on the site due to a project by the N.C. Department of Transportation, but is working to secure tenants for the shopping center.

Cary:

  • The future downtown library and 350-space parking deck near the corner of Walnut Street and Kildaire Farm Road is expected to cost the town $1.2 million more after the Town Council approved the project’s schematics. This additional cost includes $600,000 for integrated public art on the north side of the deck and the northwest stair area, as well as $630,000 for upgrades to the library’s lower level, including shell space and restrooms.
  • Staff presented a summary of feedback on the Cary Community Plan. Additionally, staff will present a summary of outstanding issues and recommended modifications prior to the public hearing. Examples of how the proposed plan policies will be utilized in guiding future rezoning and development decisions will be included. The Cary Community Plan is on schedule to be adopted by January 2017.
  • Formal adoption of the Eastern Cary Gateway Special Area Plan starts with a scheduled Town Council Public Hearing was held on September 20. There will be another Public Hearing at the Planning and Zoning Board meeting on October 17 before being scheduled to return to the November 10 Regular Town Council Meeting for a vote for adoption

Chapel Hill:

  • Chapel Hill local government has various standing boards and commissions that advise the Town Council on a wide range of issues. For more information on the work of these groups, eligibility requirements, or to complete an application form, please visit www.townofchapelhill.org/boards. Currently looking to fill vacancies on the following:
    • Grievance Hearing Board: 3 Town Resident
    • Cemeteries Advisory Board: 2 town residents
    • Environmental Stewardship Advisory Board: 1 Greenways Advocate, 1 Town resident, 1 UNC Chapel Hill Student
    • Transportation and Connectivity Advisory Board: 1 Town resident, 1 UNC Chapel Hill Student
    • Board of Adjustment: 3 Orange County appointed positions
    • Planning Commission: 1 Orange County appointed ETJ, 1 Orange County appointed JPA, ETJ or Chapel Hill resident can be appointed to position within terms of Joint planning agreement.
    • Historic District Commission: 1 resident within the Town’s planning jurisdiction (Town or ETJ)
    • Housing Advisory Board: 1 For-profit Developer
    • Library Board of Trustees: 1 Town resident
    • Community Design Commission; 1 Town resident
    • Community Policing Advisory board: 1
    • Human Services Advisory Board: 1 Town resident
    • Justice in Action Committee: 1 member


  • American Legion Concept Plan: The proposed development bringing commercial space, apartments and a larger park space to the 36-acre Legion Property on Legion Drive in Chapel Hill has been a hot-button topic since early 2016. The concept plan put forward by Woodfield Investments calls for a maximum of 400 apartment units on the property along with commercial space and enhancing the current park designated on the Ephesus-Church side of the property.

Durham (City):

  • The Durham City Council voted four to three to move forward with the “Golden Belt” Historical District with Mayor Bill Bell, Council members Cora Cole-McFadden and Eddie Davis voting no. Opposition to the designation by Durham Rescue Mission and others was due to more restrictive codes in the district.
  • The Durham City Council will hold a public hearing on Monday November 16, 2015 at 7:00 PM and will consider an Ordinance to Update Hydrant Rental Deposit Fees. To speak at the hearing, fill in the form provided by the City Clerk at the meeting. The hearing will be in Council Chambers in City Hall, 101 City Hall Plaza, Durham, NC. Charges for Hydrant Meter Deposits and Rental Rates are authorized by the City Code, Article II, Sections 70-23 and 70-49(4).
    • Proposed changes are as follows. Meter Size Deposit 5/8”= $600      3”= $3,700

If approved by City Council, the ordinance will be effective on December 1, 2015 If you wish to submit written comments to be read by City staff, you may send them via email to newwaterrates@durhamnc.gov or via USPS to Department of Water Management, 101 City Hall Plaza, Durham, NC, 27701.

  • The proposed fee corrections will be on the agenda for these meetings: Work Session, which begins at 1:00 PM on Thursday September 22, 2016; and Monday night meeting, which begins at 7:00 p.m. on October 3, 2016. Both meetings will be in the Durham City Hall, 101 City Hall Plaza, Durham, NC 27701. If you wish to submit written comments to be read by City staff, you may send them via email to newwaterrates@durhamnc.gov or via USPS to Department of Water Management, 101 City Hall Plaza, Durham, NC, 27701. To speak at either event, fill in the form provided by the City Clerk at the meeting. City Ordinance #14750, adopted on May 18, 2015, established sewer connection fees in the Southeast Service Area, and provided for a 5% annual increase effective July 1 of each year beginning in 2016. City Ordinance #14924 updated water and sewer capital facility fees for FY 2016-2017. This proposed amendment will adjust the Southeast Service Area fees to the calculated amount of the previously authorized annual increase. In addition, the proposed amendment will also clarify a minor typographical error in the total for the 5/8” meter. The sum of new water ($1,780) plus new sewer ($1,080) facility fees should be $2,860. If approved by City Council, the ordinance amending capital facility fees will go into effect on October 3, 2016. Citizens interested in addressing Council are encouraged to review the City’s guidelines on citizens’ matters and participation page at https://durhamnc.gov/1345/Citizen-ParticipationRequest-to-Appear.

Hillsborough:

  • Less than four months after fire ripped through an abandoned textile mill in Hillsborough, construction has started to transform the old mill into trendy loft-style apartments.

Holly Springs:

  • A Comprehensive Plan Amendment filed by Spaulding and Norris to and to change the future land use designation of 11.709 acres from Residential to Very High-Density Mixed-Use. The property is located at 4737 Sunset Lake Road. A public hearing was held on September 20.

Knightdale:

  • The Town Council on Tuesday, Sept. 6, held a public hearing on the change and voted unanimously to refer the matter to the Land Use Review Board’s Sept 12 meeting for a recommendation. Currently apartment complexes are a permitted use in several residential and mixed-use zoning districts. The town staff proposes to change this to require a special use permit, which would require a site-specific development plan and a public process.

Raleigh:

  • Kane Realty, which developed the thriving North Hills community off of Six Forks Road, plans to buy or lease a total of 34 acres extending east toward Wake Forest Road. The move, along with a different developer’s plan for about 21 acres, would more than double North Hills’ footprint on the east side of Six Forks. Developer John Kane says he wants to create more offices, apartments and retail space along the Interstate 440 Beltline from St. Albans Drive near Wake Forest Road.


TCC: Registration is open for the TCC Luncheon Learn on Friday, October 7th

GoWake GoTransit GoVote!

11:30 a.m. to 1:00 pm. at 111 Realtors Way in Cary.

Come learn about the referendum on the November ballot that will help fund expanded transit service throughout the Triangle. The TCC has partnered with WakeUP Wake County to presentan in-depth panel discussion featuring:

John Kane , CEO, Kane Realty
Mary Ann Baldwin, Councilperson, City of Raleigh
Asa Fleming, Raleigh Regional Association of REALTORS®    
         

Moderator:  Karen Rindge, Executive Director, WakeUP Wake County

Event Sponsor: Allen Tate Company         
REGISTER AT WWW.TRICC.ORG

 

Save the Date!  November 16, 2016 November Election Recap
featuring keynote speakers:

Chris Sinclair, Cornerstone Solutions
Brad Crone, Campaign Connections
Joe Stewart, NC FreeEnterprise Foundation

Register at www.tricc.org

A Special Thank You to Our 2016 Members and Sponsors! 

Strategic Members:  Raleigh Regional Association of REALTORS®   
HBA Raleigh-Wake County


Partner Members:  Smith Moore Leatherwood   Colliers International   Smith Anderson  Taylor Wiseman & Taylor   Triangle Apartment Association

Business Members:  Bass Nixon & Kennedy   Bohler Engineering   CalAtlantic   Community Properties   Duke Energy   Fern Hill Properties   Fonville Morisey Barefoot   Gaines & Co.  Grubb Ventures   JPM South Development   Kane Realty Corporation   K&L Gates   Kimley-Horn & Associates  Lennar  M/I Homes   McAdams   Morningstar Law Group   Paragon Commercial Bank  Pulte Group  Robuck Homes   Sepi Engineering   Williams Property Group  Withers & Ravenel   Woodfield Investments

Chamber/Gov:  Cary Chamber of Commerce    Morrisville Chamber of Commerce   Durham Regional Association of REALTORS®      Raleigh Chamber of Commerce   Midtown Raleigh Alliance              

Sponsor Members:  Allen Tate Company   Northwood Ravin  Sheetz  
&  Woodfield Investments, LLC     

TCC "in the KNOW" August 2016

August 2016 Updates

 Regional:

  • As the Raleigh-Durham Airport Authority plans how airport property could be developed in the next 25 years, some Triangle hikers and bikers are looking for alternatives to keep hundreds of acres untouched. The airport authority will host its next workshop in early October. Airport staff plans to present a single concept to the public based on feedback and complete the final master plan by this winter. This meeting originally was scheduled for early September, but airport officials decided to extend the process to have more time to refine the plans based on feedback. People interested in RDU’s 25-year vision can continue to submit comments online at bit.ly/2bIrppy.

Carrboro:

  • The Town of Carrboro is launching a new communications survey to gather feedback on the effectiveness of Town efforts to provide information to the community. The survey will run from now until Friday, September 16. The survey focuses on how and through what media does Town of Carrboro residents get information. Town of Carrboro Communications Survey

Cary:

  • The Town is considering the following locations and improvements:
    • Chapel Hill Road from Bowden Street to Sorrell Street: center turn lane addition between Bowden Street, East Johnson Street and Sorrell Street
    • Kildaire Farm Road and Ten-Ten Road: turn lane addition on southbound Kildaire Farm Road and westbound Ten-Ten Road
    • SW Cary Parkway and Waldo Rood Boulevard: turn lane extension and addition on northbound and southbound Cary Parkway and turn lane additions on eastbound Waldo Rood Boulevard
    • Waldo Rood Boulevard and MacArthur Drive: new traffic signal installation
    • Kildaire Farm Road and Advent Court: turn lane extension on southbound Kildaire Farm Road and turn lane addition on northbound Kildaire Farm Road
    • High House Road from Carpenter Upchurch Road to Widdington Lane, including Jenks Carpenter Road: traffic signal installation, left turn lane addition into Widdington Lane, turn lane extension on northbound Jenks Carpenter Road and pedestrian improvements
    • Davis Drive at Waldo Rood Boulevard: turn lane extension on southbound Davis Drive, jointly funded with and to be designed and constructed by the North Carolina Department of Transportation. Questions or feedback can also be shared by emailing amir.nezarati@townofcary.org or calling (919) 380-4235. As part of the FY2016 budget, approximately $1 million was appropriated for the project design and right of way acquisition.  For more, search “FY16 Intersection Improvements” atwww.townofcary.org.
  • About 300 new homes could be built on the north side of Morrisville Carpenter Road between Louis Stephens and Davis drives – property known as the Ferrell Farm – if the Cary Town Council approves changes to area plans. David Ferrell, who lives on the farm and whose family has owned the property for more than 100 years, is requesting a comprehensive plan amendment and rezoning to allow Ashton Woods Homes of Raleigh to develop 158 single family homes and 140 townhomes on about 80 acres of agricultural land.
  • Considered amending the Regency Park planned development district to allow for a free-standing parking lot at 100 Regency Woods Place to serve current and future needs. This case was referred to the town’s planning and zoning board.
  • Considered rezoning 1.66 acres at 6718 Holly Springs Road to allow for development of up to three single-family homes. This case was referred to the town’s planning and zoning board.
  • Construction, planning, and zoning report for July. Here are some of the interesting points:
    • The average single family dwelling was 3491 square feet compared to 3590 square feet in 2012.
    • 70 Certificates of Occupancy were issued for single family dwellings, 9 for multi-family, and 3 for non-residential.
    • County wide Cary had the second most single family permits at 13.6% of all county permits.
    • 16 new development plans were submitted including 44 single family dwellings, 182,529 square feet of commercial, and 527,400 square feet of mixed use.
    • Currently there are 18 rezonings, 10 annexations, and 5 Comprehensive Plan Amendments in review.

Chapel Hill:

  • The Town of Chapel Hill wants your input in developing a Mobility and Connectivity Plan that will recommend sidewalk priorities, connections to significant destinations, close gaps in walkability, and encourage healthier and more active behavior in residents and visitors. Residents are asked to provide input on the plan’s goals and objectives, and its vision statement. The next drop-in public input session will take place on Tuesday, September 6, in Meeting Room A of the Chapel Hill Public Library from 4 and 7 p.m.

Durham (City):

  • A significant sewer main and manhole repair project is will soon get underway involving the trenchless repair of deteriorated sewer mains and manholes located throughout Durham’s sewer collection system. Find out why cured-in-place pipe technology can reduce the time and overall cost associated with the repair of sewer pipelines.
  • Planning Fee Changes effective July 1, 2016.
  • The City Council is moving forward with a vote that could lead to charging for on-street parking in downtown Durham. The council on Thursday briefly discussed setting on-street parking fees, increasing hourly fees in garages and authorizing metered spaces downtown. It will now vote on those measures September 6. The plan calls for charging $1.50 an hour for the about 1,000 on-street public parking spaces in and near downtown, the American Tobacco Campus, the Durham Performing Arts Center, West Village, the Brightleaf District, Durham Central Park, the Durham County Human Services Complex and the North Corporation and Geer Street District. The plan also calls for increasing the hourly rate in the city’s parking garages and lots from $1 an hour to $1.25. Event parking would rise from $3 to $5.
  • Conducting a public hearing and possibly voting on the Golden Belt Local Historic District and Preservation Plan.

Garner:

  • The Town of Garner’s Planning Department is kicking off its update of Garner’s Comprehensive Growth and Transportation plans, and it needs citizen input to make the project a success. The combined project will update both the 2010 Transportation Plan and create a Comprehensive Plan “blueprint” for how to move forward in the areas of land development, utility services and other areas where the public and private sectors intersect. A new website, garnerforward. com, has been launched to provide information about the plan updates. The website includes a quick survey that citizens are urged to take. In addition, the Town and PEG Media Partners have created a great new video about the Garner Forward initiative featuring local citizens and well-known Garner locales.

Hillsborough:

  • A stormwater management utility was approved. The Stormwater Utility Fund will be supported by fees from all residential and non-residential properties within town limits that have impervious surfaces, such as parking lots and rooftops made of materials that water does not penetrate. The proposed utility will help pay for in-town stormwater and drainage system maintenance as well as about $1.1 million in improvements needed to comply with new state regulations over the next five to seven years to protect and restore the water quality of Falls Lake. Hillsborough is within a watershed that drains into the lake, which is on the EPA’s list of impaired waters.

Holly Springs:

  • N.C. 55 and Avent Ferry Road Intersection- Recent Work: Median reshaping, grading and paving, U-turn bulb-out and turn lane paving, and storm pipe installation.
    • Allowed Work Times: Monday through Friday, 7 a.m. - 9 p.m.; Saturdays, 8 a.m. - 9 p.m., (No Sunday work allowed without approval) No Lane Closures Allowed: Monday through Friday, 7 a.m. – 9 a.m.; 4 p.m. – 6 p.m.
  • Main Street Extension- Recent Work: Clearing, grading, utility relocations, storm pipe installation, earth hauling, traffic control device installation.
    • Allowed Work Times: Monday through Friday, 7 a.m. - 9 p.m.; Saturdays, 8 a.m. - 9 p.m., (No Sunday work allowed without approval) No Lane Closures Allowed: Monday through Friday, 7 a.m. – 9 a.m.; 4 p.m. – 6 p.m. The Main Street Extension project is on schedule for completion in September 2017. Most of the funding is federal.
  • Public Hearings scheduled for September 6, 2016- Unified Development Ordinance Amendment: Continued from July 19, 2016, 16-UDO-02: LB Local Business Self-Storage (Mini-) Warehouse Legal   More Information.

Morrisville:

  • In the case of the Stadelmeier development located on Morrisville-Carpenter Road, the town’s decision to tie the construction of the project to securing funds to widen the thoroughfare was an unorthodox one, but Mayor Mark Stohlman said it was the only way he could justify the resulting increase in congestion. Some council members wanted to restrict the development until it was guaranteed the town could fully pay for the road work to expand capacity. But the question of whether the town will see any of that money will remain unanswered until early next year, though, when Morrisville finds out if it will get the grant it needs to complete the widening on schedule.

Raleigh:

  • Neighbors are unhappy about a developer’s plan to build a mixed-use development in North Raleigh near the site of a proposed Publix grocery store that residents successfully fought two years ago. D&N Development wants to build an estimated $50 million project on a 17.3-acre tract at the corner of Falls of Neuse and Raven Ridge roads. Early plans include 160 condominiums, a roughly 50,000-square-foot grocery store and about 56,000 square feet of additional retail space. A Raleigh Planning Commission subcommittee is expected to consider the proposal Sept. 6, and the entire commission could consider it September 13.

TCC Pig Pickin' Straw Poll Results & The Insider Article

TCC Political Pig Pickin' 
Check out the photos, straw poll results and more at
http://www.tricc.org/political/

 

Candidate & Straw Poll Sponsor
Smith Moore Leatherwood

Cornhole Sponsors
Raleigh Regional Association of REALTORS
Triangle Apartment Association
CalAtlantic

Pig & Pint Sponsors
McAdams
TCAR
Withers & Ravenel
Morningstar Law Firm
M/I Homes of Raleigh
Nexsen Pruet, PLLC
Brownlee Whitlow Praet & File, PLLC
Isaac Hunter's Hospitality

Door Prize Sponsors
Coglins
Print Elect
Paddy O'Beers
Morningstar Law Group
Colliers International
Northwood Ravin
Fonville Morisey Barefoot
Paragon Commercial Bank
Sepi Engineering & Construction
Morrisville Chamber Chamber of Commerce

TCC POLITICAL PIG PICKIN' - The Insider Article

TCC Political Pig Pickin' 
Check out the photos, straw poll results and more at
http://www.tricc.org/political/

 

Candidate & Straw Poll Sponsor
Smith Moore Leatherwood

Cornhole Sponsors
Raleigh Regional Association of REALTORS
Triangle Apartment Association
CalAtlantic

Pig & Pint Sponsors
McAdams
TCAR
Withers & Ravenel
Morningstar Law Firm
M/I Homes of Raleigh
Nexsen Pruet, PLLC
Brownlee Whitlow Praet & File, PLLC
Isaac Hunter's Hospitality

Door Prize Sponsors
Coglins
Print Elect
Paddy O'Beers
Morningstar Law Group
Colliers International
Northwood Ravin
Fonville Morisey Barefoot
Paragon Commercial Bank
Sepi Engineering & Construction
Morrisville Chamber Chamber of Commerce

TCC Coffee Chat with Wake County Public School System - July 20, 2016

The Triangle Community Coalition
had another successful Coffee Chat with the
Wake County School Boardon July 20, 2016. 

Joining our members in an informal chat were Tom Benton, Chairman of WCPSS Board D1, Monika Johnson-Hostler, Vice Chair, D2, Bill Fletcher, D9, Susan Evans D8, Jim Martin, D5, and Kevin Hill D3.

The TCC had an amazing showing of board members for the first Coffee Chat with Wake County Public Schools in several years.  The board just came off a long night to discuss the Wake County Public School budget and there was obvious frustration at the $17.5MM gap in funding.  We’ll discuss that in a minute. 

The TCC had a good showing of members ranging from national home builders, developers and businesses to land-use attorneys and engineers. 
The group was small enough, however, to gather around a table and really have an intimate conversation about development, the School System and some of the issues both unique and shared. 

 Quick Facts – let’s open it up!

  •  WCPSS has a $1.5Billion, yes with a ‘B’, operating budget annually.
  •  WCPSS has 18,000 employees.
  •  It costs approximately $8000/year/pupil in Wake County – of this about $4k is for a typical good student, while there is about $3,800/student that goes towards meeting the needs of special education. [for reference – catholic schools and charters which are not required and do not cater to the special needs, are able to educate a student for about $4,000/year/pupil.]
  •  Reference was made that Massachusetts, with their significantly higher taxes, costs as much as $15,000/year/pupil.
  • 13% of the student population in Wake County receive special education (national average is about 5%, so this shows the disproportionate amount WCPSS holds).
  •  18% of the student population in Wake County are on the AIG (academically intelligent/gifted) program (4% is the national average).  So Wake County Public Schools is desirable place for achievement.
  •  Of the total operating budget annually, 60%+/- is provided by the State, 30%+/- through County funding while the remaining 10% is made up through federal funding and other local sources.
  •  The building program provided through taxpayer bonds is $373MM (20% of the total $1.84B total budget).
  •  Of the total operating budget, 94% goes towards personnel; broken down a little differently 91% goes towards schools, 6% on operations support, 2% on academic achievement and only 1% on school board, superintendent, chief of staff and communications.
  •  This years $17.5MM budget gap represents just 0.8% of the total budget. 
  •  For every $0.01 of property tax increase in Wake County it equates to $13MM.
  •  The per pupil funding from ‘08~’15 has decreased by 0.2% while the total growth & enrollment grew by 14%.

Board member Kevin Hill discussed some interesting notions that Wake County is a very large population, and with that comes a very large volume of $ that is generated through tax.  The school system budget is significant!  The school system is among the top 20 largest programs nationally.  The school system is trying to meet demand with the projected and actual growth.  As well… the school system is trying to keep up with the cost of living. 

Board member/Chair Tom Benton discussed that the funding created by the County gives the most flexibility.  The County funds above the state minimum (base) rate because what is acceptable to the State is not as good as Wake County.  For example Wake County gave over 20% more over the past 3 years (which doesn’t include growth statistics).  

Board member Susan Evans commented that the School Board cannot tax.  Funds are from the State and the Federal allocations.

Discussion:

Strategic Plans for WCPSS 
5~10 year perception of “bad or under performing schools” will be remediated.  Cite example of Knightdale which as seen a resurgence in positive feedback in as few as 3 years.  7 year plan is to get 11 schools  renovated from the ground up.  The slowdown in growth during the recession has helped with current renovation plans.  Goal to reduce dependence on mobile units through existing school renovation.  Apex HS will use the new Green Level High School set to open in 2017 as their home base for 2 years
while Apex HS is completely renovated.  WCPSS is using new construction to phase existing facilities and improve those locations.

 Districting:  The WCPSS Boards full-heartedly supports that a County-wide central board provides central operation and keeps the cost of operation down significantly over community schools.  Economies of scale are significant over districts.

 Funding from the State Level: According to several board members it appears that State SenatorChad Barefoot is in opposition to the budget allocation to Wake County, while there is pro-movement/support from State House Representative Rosa Gill to provide Wake County the needed budget amount.

 Current Teachers/Staff:  

  • Teachers within Wake County are citing issues related to the job such as “no more autonomy” and “no time to teach” where the larger emphasis is board-scale testing and end of year grading which has taken its toll on traditional grading.

  • As to teacher retention and attraction – Huge Concern!  The surrounding states show the pay scale is up, and these states are promoting/scouting from North Carolina.  The biggest concern now is that there is not going to be enough teachers in the future.  The current university and “out-of-state” pipelines that were generous to NC during 2008 (recession) have since become stale.

  • There is a similar empty principal pipeline due to the similar situation.

Year Round vs Traditional:

  • With 4 tracks that are fully loaded there is a 30% capacity but it comes with an operational expense. 
  •  WCPSS is the only county in NC that has a multi-tract year-round system in place.
  •  Amongst the WCPSS participants there is a growing dissatisfaction with year round calendar citing mostly mis-alignment of household students schedules. 
  •  There is currently 2,000 empty seats in year round programs, meaning that participants are preferring the traditional tract.
  •  During the highest growth [2005] there was 2000 pupil/year growth rate.  The WCPSS needed more capacity and the answer was year round, so the 2006 plan submitted included year round schools to meet this capacity need.  In the 2013 building plan WCPSS did not assume year-round, the WCPSS board opted for traditional. 
  • In summary the efficiency and operational costs of runninga High School year-round over the traditional tract doesn’t appear to work with the current system. 
  •  The WCPSS board cited that a mandatory “year-round” schedule would result in a lawsuit filing. They discussed the 2009 change in the board makeup due, in large part, to the year-round grumblings.

Future Concerns:

  •  Build capacity where it is needed!
     
  •  Renovation may suffer due to new school/emerging markets winning over.
     
  •  Capital Plan past 10 years is all about growth.  The WCPSS has 2MM SF of buildings that are over 40 years old without renovation, roughly 10% of the current facilities.  To put that in perspective, the County plans for minor renovations at 20-years and major renovations at 40-years.  There is a serious need.  The board is trying to get the need for new schools and the renovations of existing facilities on the same “need” scale.
     
  •  Capital Budget and Operational Budget planning in the future is a challenge, and the Board would like to see the budget forecast 10-years out using the projected tax rate and what that might be?

 

TCC "in the KNOW" July 2016

July 2016 Updates

North Carolina:

  • Lawmakers passed the NC Promise Tuition Plan, which cuts tuition beginning in fall 2018 at Western Carolina University, UNC-Pembroke and Elizabeth City State University. The three schools would charge an in-state tuition rate of $500 per semester and an out-of-state rate of $2,500. In the wake of a successful lawsuit, legislators voted to drop restrictions on development along the paths of future road projects.
  • In the wake of a successful lawsuit, legislators voted to drop restrictions on development along the paths of future road projects.  The bill addresses the N.C. Supreme Court’s ruling in June that through the use of the Map Act, the N.C. Department of Transportation was effectively taking private property without paying for it. The court sided with property owners who haven’t been able to develop their land for decades because the property is reserved for a future highway. If McCrory signs the bill, all current Map Act development restrictions would be dropped. Those areas include the route of the future Interstate 540 loop in southern Wake County as well as the Winston-Salem Western Loop and the U.S. 17 Hampstead Bypass. No additional routes could be protected from development until July 1, 2017. And DOT would develop recommendations for a new policy that balances property rights with road building needs.

Chatham County:

  • As Chatham County plans for the next 25 years, some neighbors are worried about changes in the works that could impact their livelihoods. To view the details of the comprehensive plan and details on additional meetings, click here: http://www.chathamnc.org/index.aspx?page=1860

Wake County:

  • Wake County voters could vote this fall for members of the Board of Commissioners and school board under election maps that are drawn by a federal judge. State election officials raised concerns recently about their ability to draw new districts for the Wake Board of Commissioners and school board for the Nov. 8 election. Election officials said they’d do so if ordered.

Apex:

  • A brief but intense debate about building an apartment complex near Apex’s new Costco wrapped up as the Town Council voted unanimously to approve a rezoning petition that would permit its construction. Northview Partners, the developer of Meridian at Nichols Plaza, agreed to reduce the project’s maximum number of apartment units from 300 to 270 and to beef up its stormwater retention pond to handle more severe flooding. Those concessions were made to address resident concerns related to both runoffs from the site, which is uphill from Apex Lake, and traffic along U.S. 64 and Laura Duncan Road.
  • The Developer who first proposed Veridea refuses to sign off on revised plans for 1,000-acre development. The town installed Hendrickson as “responsible person” to ensure the project’s big-picture vision won’t change. The amendment would allow the majority stakeholder in land to appoint its own responsible person.

Cary:

  • Cary began acquiring land to move forward with a $23.5 million project to complete the last 1.8-mile stretch of Morrisville Parkway and tie it into N.C. 540. Construction is expected to begin in early 2018 and last 18 months. The N.C. Turnpike Authority is allocating $12.5 million, the N.C. Department of Transportation allocated $3 million, and Cary is responsible for the remaining cost.
  •  The Town Planning and Zoning Board recommended approval of the next round of Land Development Ordinance amendments (LDO Round 34) to the Town Council.  The Town Council will hear and make a decision on these text amendments in an upcoming council meeting.  Various items such as revisions to decision making authority for Payment in Lieu, and site plan approvals and champion trees are part of this amendment.
  • Open Houses on July 28 and August 2 for Imagine Cary from 5:30-8:30 pm at the Herb Young Community Center. 

Chapel Hill:

  • Welcome to Chapel Hill Open Data!  The purpose of this site is to increase government transparency by facilitating public access to local government information. With this web-based service, anyone in the community or around the world can access an ever-growing catalog of data sets from Town departments and divisions at www.chapelhillopendata.org.  Users can easily create graphs, charts, and maps based on the data sets, as well as download data, interact with it, and reuse it.  The Town invites you to participate in the evolution of the catalog by suggesting a dataset and by sharing how you are using the site. 
  • The Council authorized Town staff to draft policy on light manufacturing based on the committee’s work on this topic. The Council authorized the Town Manager to initiate the process for public hearing by the Council in the fall. The Council also endorsed the idea of the Joint Incentives Policy framework and authorized the Town Manager to bring it back to Council as a draft policy in the fall.
  • The Council approved text amendments to Section 3.11 (Ephesus/Fordham Form District) of the Land Use Management Ordinance (LUMO) to create standards for block lengths and building pass-throughs. The new standards are 400 foot block lengths with 200 foot pass-throughs. The authorization allows for 10 percent administrative approval for technical reasons and approval of a better alternative design by the CDC up to 600 feet.
  • View the plan recently approved by the Chapel Hill Town Council at http://bit.ly/28LnvVR. The plan calls for more cultural programming and sitting areas; to improve way-finding signage, parking, pedestrian crossings, sidewalks, traffic calming and lighting; to activate green spaces and plazas; attract business and entrepreneurial activity; and to enhance overall beautification in the very heart of Chapel Hill.  The Council also recently adopted new signage rules that make it easy for small businesses to install signs that make their storefronts more visible and attractive.

Durham (City):

  • Two seven-story buildings (named North and South) covering almost 350,000 square feet will be constructed on what is now a large parking lot as the Durham Innovation District project picks up momentum.

Garner:

  • Phase two of the McCullers Crossing project off Ten Ten and U.S. 401 will move forward. The Garner Town Council unanimously approved a site plan approval for the second phase of the Halle Company’s 99-acre project. Phase two of the three-phase cluster will add 94 single-family homes onto the 412-unit apartment complex that was approved by the Town Council last month. The single family homes will sit on 36 acres of land.

Holly Springs:

  • The Holly Springs Town Council has approved agreements with the N.C. Department of Transportation to obtain nearly $1.8 million to connect North Main Athletic Complex with N.C. 55 Bypass and extend a greenway underneath the highway. In agreements approved, NCDOT would provide $1.2 million to extend Sportsmanship Way, which runs off North Main Street. The town would contribute an estimated $300,000. The greenway would connect the east side of town with Avent Ferry Road on the west side, using an existing pedestrian tunnel underneath N.C. 55. NCDOT would provide $580,000, with the town’s share estimated at $145,000.
  • The council tabled a decision on an infill development plan for town homes and a duplex at the intersection of Elm and Main streets downtown. Concerns were raised about parking, the development’s density, and its design. The council also approved a Unified Development Ordinance modification regarding cluster mailbox units and rezoned 8.46 acres in the Rosewood Centre between North Main Street and N.C. 55.
  • The Town of Holly Springs is moving forward with a “regional” stormwater basin as part of the Mim’s Property Master Plan in the downtown area, as a way to promote/facilitate development in the downtown. http://nc-hollysprings2.civicplus.com/644/Mims-Site-BMP-Improvements

    Raleigh:
  • The City of Raleigh is planning to revamp what it calls the southern gateway to downtown. Over the past year, employees have been studying ways to develop South Saunders and South Wilmington streets. The area serves as an entry point for travelers coming from Garner, Fuquay-Varina and off Interstate 40. You can find out more about the city’s study of the southern gateway corridor by viewing the full draft report, click here.
  •  A resident asked council to examine sideyard setbacks in all residential zoning districts; Crowder asks that planning staff look at that in all residential districts and bring that to the committee. They will look at it just in R-4 and R-6 zoned districts. The motion passes 5-3 with Gaylord, Thompson and Baldwin dissenting.
  • Stormwater Fee Rate Increase- Effective July 1, 2016: A $1.00 per Single Family Equivalent Unit (SFEU) increase. The rate increase will be used to fund an expanded Stormwater Capital Improvement Plan and increased levels of service related to drainage complaint resolution and infrastructure maintenance. If you should have any questions regarding the rate change and what it means to you, please contact the Stormwater Management Program at 919-996-3940 orStormwaterFee@raleighnc.gov.
  • Upcoming Public Hearings:
    • August 2, 2016, 7:00 p.m.
      • Petition Annexation- 3000 Club Drive
      • Pullen Road Extension

Wake Forest:

  • The public will take notice that the Wake Forest Planning Board and the Board of Commissioners will hold a joint public hearing on Tuesday, August 2, 2016 at 7:30 p.m. in the Wake Forest Town Hall.  The purpose of the hearing is to consider amending the Wake Forest Unified Development Ordinance, specifically, Chapter 5. Building Design Standards, Chapter 9. Parking & Driveways and Chapter 15. Administration.  Copies of the proposed amendments are on file at the Wake Forest Planning Department and available for public review during business hours.

Wendell:

  • The Town Board of Commissioners voted unanimously Monday, July 11, to table a decision on a zoning change that would allow a senior housing development adjacent to the Edgemont Landing subdivision. The Greater N.C. Jurisdiction Church of God in Christ, at 1609 Wendell Blvd., is requesting a change from Neighborhood Center zoning to Corridor Mixed Use on 43.57 acres adjacent to the church with a conditional district to allow multifamily senior housing, including duplexes, town homes and apartments.

Zebulon:

  • N. Arendell Avenue Access and Operational Improvements Project- Town of Zebulon has hired Volkert, Inc. and Summit Design and Engineering Services to design the following operational improvements to the Arendell Avenue corridor:
    • Dual left turns from southbound Pearces Road onto southbound Arendell Avenue
    • Turn signal modifications to allow more time for left-turning vehicles
    • 400' of additional lane on the southbound side of Arendell Avenue
    • Construction of median for safer access movements
    • New sidewalks along Arendell Avenue
    • Roadway improvements on Jones Street, Hendricks Drive, and a new service road behind Eddins Oil. If you have any questions regarding this project, please call Public Works at 919-269-5285 or Planning at 919-823-1810.

 

Triangle Community Coalition:

 

  • At the July 21, 2016 TCC Board of Directors meeting, the Board members voted to support the Wake County Transit Plan and the November 8, 2016 referendum that will fund it.  The link to all information re: the resolutions supporting both is  http://www.tricc.org/wake-county-transit-plan-information/#
    With Wake County growing by 63 people every day, the TCC understands the importance of transportation options for all Triangle area residents.  The Board feels that the proposed plan is financially prudent and takes a measured approach towards enhancing transit.  The funding mechanism will be a one half cent addition to the sales tax which the Board feels is a more equitable and broad-based method than say a property tax increase. We encourage all our members to vote for the referendum on November 8.
     
  • Upcoming Events:  

            Wednesday, August 24 Coffee Chat with Town of Cary - Member Only!

2016 TCC Political Pig Pickin’
September 8, 2016 at Angus Barn
Get ready for an old fashion political rally and candidate forum, with style.
Here's what we've planned for the evening:


Candidates running for US Congress, NC General Assembly,
County Commissioners and local School Board will
have the
opportunity to mingle with hundreds of potential voters.
We'll serve a little pig and lots of politics.

Candidates will have an opportunity to give a short and informal
"stump speech" after competing in a fun toss of Cornhole.
Winners take the stage!


A straw poll to wrap up the event.

Don't miss out on your opportunity to sponsor this years event!
Download a Sponsorship Form Here!  


 

 Thank You to Our 2016 Members and Sponsors!

Strategic Members:  Raleigh Regional Association of REALTORS®   
HBA Raleigh-Wake County


Partner Members:  Smith Moore Leatherwood   Colliers International   Smith Anderson  Taylor Wiseman & Taylor   Triangle Apartment Association

Business Members:  Bass Nixon & Kennedy   Bohler Engineering   CalAtlantic   Community Properties   Duke Energy   Fern Hill Properties   Fonville Morisey Barefoot   Gaines & Co.  Grubb Ventures   JPM South Development   Kane Realty Corporation  
K&L Gates   Kimley-Horn & Associates  Lennar  M/I Homes   McAdams   Morningstar Law Group   Paragon Commercial Bank  Pulte Group  Robuck Homes   Sepi Engineering   Williams Property Group  Withers & Ravenel   Woodfield Investments


Chamber/Gov:  Cary Chamber of Commerce    Morrisville Chamber of Commerce   Durham Regional Association of REALTORS®      Raleigh Chamber of Commerce   Midtown Raleigh Alliance              

Sponsor Members:  Allen Tate Company   Northwood Ravin  Sheetz  &  
Woodfield Investments, LLC      

Download a PDF here!

TCC "in the KNOW" June 2016

June 2016 Updates

 North Carolina:

  • In November, voters will decide whether to add a 5.5 percent cap on income tax rates to the state constitution under a bill approved Tuesday in a N.C. Senate committee. The constitutional amendment wouldn’t affect the current rate – which will drop from 5.75 percent to 5.499 percent next year – but would effectively prevent the legislature from raising income taxes. The constitution now includes a maximum rate of 10 percent.
  • North Carolina government has effectively taken private property through a law restricting what landowners within proposed highway routes could do to improve or sell tracts, so those owners may be compensated, the state Supreme Court ruled. The ruling, which addresses what's called the Map Act, was good news for thousands of property owners throughout the state, particularly those along anticipated urban loops around Winston-Salem and Raleigh.
  • North Carolina Attorney General Roy Cooper has filed a lawsuit on behalf of the state against Carolinas HealthCare System, saying it has illegally reduced competition and limited the ability of consumers to find better health care deals. The lawsuit was filed jointly with the U.S. Department of Justice in U.S. District Court in Asheville.
  • The Senate's proposed "Regulatory Reduction Act of 2016" cleared another committee. The measure would repeal the state's electronics recycling program, halt annual motor vehicle emissions testing in eight counties and eliminate or consolidate environmental reports.
  • A planned light rail line connecting Durham and Chapel Hill could be delayed and lose funding under a budget provision approved by the state Senate. Both the House and Senate budgets would eliminate one obstacle: a $500,000 cap on state funding for light rail projects. The legislature put the cap in last year’s budget, not long after state transportation officials committed $138 million for the project. But while eliminating the current cap, the Senate budget provision would also add new restrictions: Each commuter rail or light rail project couldn’t receive more than 10 percent of its total funding from the state. And the Durham-Chapel Hill project wouldn’t automatically get funding – it would have to wait two years and go through the Department of Transportation’s prioritization process again.
  • The Senate met early this month to give its final approval to the $22.2 billion plan drawn up by Republicans. Debate lasted less than 10 minutes before senators voted 26-13 for the plan. They debated a few hours before giving initial approval on a party-line vote. GOP leaders highlighted teacher pay raises in the proposal and nearly $600 million more in reserves for the next economic downturn. Democrats criticized the lack of across-the-board state employee raises and increased spending on scholarships for K-12 students to attend private schools. The House already approved its budget changes. Next, legislators from both chambers will negotiate a compromise plan to present to Gov. Pat McCrory. 

Regional:

  • A new, $1 billion interstate highway planned to connect Norfolk and Raleigh will open a high-speed, unobstructed route between a Virginia port and the Research Triangle. The road, to be called Interstate 87, could take as long as two decades to complete. It has the support of elected officials, business leaders and agencies in Virginia and North Carolina, including both highway departments, chambers of commerce and all four senators. 

Wake County:

  • County leaders adopt plan to bring commuter rail by 2027. They place half-cent sales tax referendum on November ballot. Plan would also bring more buses, new routes 

Cary:

  • Sean R. Stegall has been selected as the Town of Cary’s next town manager. Stegall’s comes to Cary from Elgin, Ill., where he was city manager since 2009. His first day in Cary will be on Aug. 4.
  • Northwoods Associates has proposed a $50 million project at the corner of Chatham St and Harrison Ave that would include high density residential, office and restaurant/retail along with structured parking, adjacent to the downtown core. This would be a joint partnership with Northwoods Associates, The First Baptist Church and the town. The town would be a partner in the public parking component and assist with road construction and/or improvements to the tune of $5 million.
  • Round 34 Land Development Ordinance Amendments

 

Chapel Hill:

  • The Council enacted text amendments that eliminate the minimum 25-acre land requirement and also eliminate the maximum 20-year permit term limits associated with a Development Agreement. These amendments are in response to recent changes in State Statutes. Learn more at www.townofchapelhill.org/legislative-updates
  • The Town of Chapel Hill wants your input in developing a Mobility and Connectivity Plan that will recommend connections to significant destinations, close gaps in walkability, and encourage healthier and more active behavior in residents and visitors. The Kickoff Public Input Session for the Mobility and Connectivity Plan will be held on Thursday, June 30, in Meeting Room A of the Chapel Hill Public Library. Drop in anytime between 3:30 and 7 p.m. 

Durham (City):

  • NOTICE OF PROPOSED FEE CHANGES: If you wish to submit written comments to be read by City staff, you may send them via email to newwaterrates@durhamnc.gov or via USPS to Department of Water Management, 101 City Hall Plaza, Durham, NC, 27701. To speak at either event, fill in the form provided by the City Clerk at the meeting. 

Garner:

  • Improved Nature LLC has selected Garner, N.C., as the location to build its first production facility to produce proprietary vegetable-based meat substitute products. Improved Nature will set up a manufacturing facility at 101 Vandora Springs Road in Garner to produce various types of meat replacement products that emulate the texture, flavor and sensory experience of meat yet maintain a clean label.
  • The Planning Commission approved phase two of the 99-acre McCullers Crossing development project, less than two weeks after the Town Council approved phase one. The project will be a mixed-use development, a combination of a 412-unit apartment complex, 94 single-family homes and townhomes that will be on 19 acres of land. The development is located near the intersection of Ten Ten Road and U.S. 401. To the west is a subdivision in the Fuquay-Varina town limits. Phase two of the three-phase cluster project is made up of the single-family homes, which will sit on 36 acres of land. The average lot size for the homes is expected to be 7,435 square feet. 

Holly Springs:

  • Town Council approved plans to expand the Holly Springs Business Park by 60 acres. Town staff hopes it will soon become the only state-certified site of its size in Wake County, likely making it more desirable to potential new businesses. The Town Council also approved the fiscal year 2016-17 budget.
  • Communications provider Ting has picked the neighborhood of Holly Glen as the launching place for a high-speed fiber optic network in Holly Springs. Construction of the gigabit-speed network - which Ting brands as "crazy fast Internet" - will begin in August. 

Raleigh:

  • Mark your calendar: TCC Coffee Chat with the City of Raleigh - July 27th at 8 a.m. 222 West Hargett Street Conference Room 305, R.S.V.P. to charlenel@tricc.org
  • July 5, 2016, 7:00 p.m.
    • STC-8-15 - Belvin Drive (Held open from 5/3/16 hearing)

Petition Annexation- 2409 Gresham Lake Road/NorthRidge Place

    • TC-8-16 - Construction Surety
    • UDO Height Limits & Building Setbacks - Overlay Districts
  • Hillsborough Street Revitalization Project recently broke ground, will make the ride along the thoroughfare a bit smoother. City leaders held a ceremonial groundbreaking Thursday morning for the $18 million project that will put three roundabouts between Gardner Street and Rosemary Street by the end of 2017. There will also be new bike lanes, medians designed to slow traffic down, and public art.


2016 TCC Political Pig Pickin’
Get ready for an old fashion political rally and candidate forum, with style.
Here's what we've planned for the evening:

Candidates running for US Congress, NC General Assembly, County Commissioners
and local School Board will
have the opportunity to mingle with hundreds of potential voters.

We'll serve a little pig and lots of politics.

Candidates will have an opportunity to give a short and informal
"stump speech" after competing in a fun toss of Cornhole.
Winners take the stage!

A straw poll to wrap up the event.

Don't miss out on your opportunity to sponsor this years event!
Download a Sponsorship Form Here!  

  A Special Thank You to Our 2016 Members and Sponsors!

Strategic Members:  Raleigh Regional Association of REALTORS®   
&   HBA Raleigh-Wake County


Partner Members:  Smith Moore Leatherwood   Colliers International  
Smith Anderson  Taylor Wiseman & Taylor   Triangle Apartment Association


Business Members:  Bass Nixon & Kennedy   Bohler Engineering   CalAtlantic  
Community Properties   Duke Energy   Fern Hill Properties  
Fonville Morisey Barefoot   Gaines & Co.  Grubb Ventures  
JPM South Development   Kane Realty Corporation   K&L Gates  
Kimley-Horn & Associates  Lennar  M/I Homes   McAdams  
Morningstar Law Group   Paragon Commercial Bank  Pulte Group  
Robuck Homes  Sepi Engineering   Williams Property Group  
Withers & Ravenel   Woodfield Investments


Chamber/Gov:  Cary Chamber of Commerce    
Morrisville Chamber of Commerce  
Durham Regional Association of REALTORS®     
      Raleigh Chamber of Commerce   Midtown Raleigh Alliance              


Sponsor Members:  Allen Tate Company   Northwood Ravin  
Sheetz    Woodfield Investments, LLC           


 

 

TCC Coffee Chat with City of Durham Summary - 06.15.16

The Triangle Community Coalition had another successful Coffee Chat with the City of Durham Elected Officials and Staff on June 16, 2016. 

Joining our members in an informal chat were Mayor Bill Bell, Councilors Eddie David, Cora Cole-McFadden, Don Moffitt, and Steve Schewel.  Staff included, City Manager Tom Bonfield, Deputy City Managers Keith Chadwell, Wanda Page and Bo Ferguson, Department of Economic and Workforce Development Grace Dzidzrenyo and Esther Coleman, City/County Planning Department Patrick Young, and Senior Economic Dev. Coordinator Reggie Jones.

We provided the City of Durham with a better perspective of the Triangle Community Coalition's goal to
be a proactive partner in growth and land use issues and to work with senior staff and elected officials to develop policies, regulations, and procedures to encourage economic development, produce predictable (yet flexible) outcomes for all stakeholders, and protect the community's interests.

The City appreciated the TCC’s ability to offer objective facts and information in efforts to improve public policy debates and create effective working relationships between the business community and local government.  We had some great interaction with the TCC membership in attendance and had opportunity to talk about the following:

·         Cora Cole-McFadden – Durham City Council

The Triangle Community Coalition had another successful Coffee Chat with the City of Durham Elected Officials and Staff on June 16, 2016. 

Joining our members in an informal chat were Mayor Bill Bell, Councilors Eddie David, Cora Cole-McFadden, Don Moffitt, and Steve Schewel.  Staff included, City Manager Tom Bonfield, Deputy City Managers Keith Chadwell, Wanda Page and Bo Ferguson, Department of Economic and Workforce Development Grace Dzidzrenyo and Esther Coleman, City/County Planning Department Patrick Young, and Senior Economic Dev. Coordinator Reggie Jones.

We provided the City of Durham with a better perspective of the Triangle Community Coalition's goal to be a proactive partner in growth and land use issues and to work with senior staff and elected officials to develop policies, regulations, and procedures to encourage economic development, produce predictable (yet flexible) outcomes for all stakeholders, and protect the community's interests.

The City appreciated the TCC’s ability to offer objective facts and information in efforts to improve public policy debates and create effective working relationships between the business community and local government.  We had some great interaction with the TCC membership in attendance and had opportunity to talk about the following:

·         Cora Cole-McFadden – Durham City Council

o    Attracting people and businesses is a priority for the City

o    Challenges are transportation/utility capacity/watershed regulations/competition in the region for relocating companies/affordable housing

·         Eddie Davis – Durham City Council

o    Would like the development community to look at other areas of Durham – Fayetteville Street and Alston Avenue for more growth

o    Acknowledges that the south of Durham is expanding and good things are happening

·         Tom Bonfield – City Manager

o    Last year the City broke its all-time record for building permits

o    Infrastructure is a challenge

o    The City is becoming tighter for business incentives

§  City is more likely to partner for parking or affordable housing

§  Density bonus – staff have been working on creating more value to use this option

·         Pat Young – City/County Planning

o    Focused on improving and consolidating customer service and intake functions for development services, Customer Service Center much like Raleigh.

o    Currently in the proposed budget to create a one-stop-shop focusing on helping customers through the development processes and managing internal communications

§  Looked at best practices across the region and reached out Charlotte as well

§  If budget is approved by Council, implementation will be April 2017

§  5 new positions for customer service and intake

§  Will offer more pre-submittal and resubmittal meeting slots with staff

·         Don Moffitt (Durham City Council) asked Pat what developers could do to expedite the process.

o    Increase the quality and completeness of submittals

o    The new intake process should make this better by more pre-submittal meetings and more communication

·         Tom Johnson – Developing good checklists that applies to more specific projects would be very helpful

·         Sara Young – On Transit - Light rail line will have 11 stations in Durham

o    The city is wanting to put zoning in place in transit areas to include more mixed-use and pedestrian oriented development.

o    Until the UDO is updated, there’s a limbo period where council will be reluctant to vote on zonings in these areas.

o    Monday’s Council meeting will prioritize these density areas (5 of them)

·         Mayor Bill Bell – City is struggling to find a toolbox for developers to use for affordable housing

o    It was mentioned that design standards should be flexible to help with costs

·         City Downtown is currently under parked right now, and projects seeking P3/incentive should include additional parking and/or affordable housing components

·         City Staffing:

o    Planning is at full staff

o    Engineering is short but recruiting now

o    Inspections is back at full staff

§  Lost 4 state level certified inspectors to other municipalities in the last year

§  Brought back a few retireeso    Attracting people and businesses is a priority for the City

o    Challenges are transportation/utility capacity/watershed regulations/competition in the region for relocating companies/affordable housing

·         Eddie Davis – Durham City Council

o    Would like the development community to look at other areas of Durham – Fayetteville Street and Alston Avenue for more growth

o    Acknowledges that the south of Durham is expanding and good things are happening

·         Tom Bonfield – City Manager

o    Last year the City broke its all-time record for building permits

o    Infrastructure is a challenge

o    The City is becoming tighter for business incentives

§  City is more likely to partner for parking or affordable housing

§  Density bonus – staff have been working on creating more value to use this option

·         Pat Young – City/County Planning

o    Focused on improving and consolidating customer service and intake functions for development services, Customer Service Center much like Raleigh.

o    Currently in the proposed budget to create a one-stop-shop focusing on helping customers through the development processes and managing internal communications

§  Looked at best practices across the region and reached out Charlotte as well

§  If budget is approved by Council, implementation will be April 2017

§  5 new positions for customer service and intake

§  Will offer more pre-submittal and resubmittal meeting slots with staff



·         Don Moffitt (Durham City Council) asked Pat what developers could do to expedite the process.

o    Increase the quality and completeness of submittals

o    The new intake process should make this better by more pre-submittal meetings and more communication

·         Tom Johnson – Developing good checklists that applies to more specific projects would be very helpful

·         Sara Young – On Transit - Light rail line will have 11 stations in Durham

o    The city is wanting to put zoning in place in transit areas to include more mixed-use and pedestrian oriented development.

o    Until the UDO is updated, there’s a limbo period where council will be reluctant to vote on zonings in these areas.

o    Monday’s Council meeting will prioritize these density areas (5 of them)

·         Mayor Bill Bell – City is struggling to find a toolbox for developers to use for affordable housing

o    It was mentioned that design standards should be flexible to help with costs

·         City Downtown is currently under parked right now, and projects seeking P3/incentive should include additional parking and/or affordable housing components

·         City Staffing:

o    Planning is at full staff

o    Engineering is short but recruiting now

o    Inspections is back at full staff

§  Lost 4 state level certified inspectors to other municipalities in the last year

§  Brought back a few retirees

TCC "in the KNOW" May 2016

North Carolina:

  • The House scheduled more debates before the second of two required votes on the $22.2 billion state government spending plan. All but 12 of the 115 House members voting gave initial approval to the measure, which gives teachers and state employees raises and income tax filers’ tax breaks by slowly raising the standard deduction over the next four years. After the final vote the debate officially moves to the Senate. House and Senate negotiators ultimately want to get a final plan to Gov. Pat McCrory's desk before July 1.
  • Both the House and the Senate want to cut personal income taxes, but the Senate wants to make cuts over two years, compared with a four-year schedule in the state House budget. "This is a targeted tax cut for the middle-class," Sen. Bob Rucho, R-Mecklenburg. Rucho's bill, Senate Bill 818, would expand the state's personal income tax exemption – what some people call the zero bracket – in two steps over the next two years. For a couple married and filing jointly, they would pay no income tax on the first $16,500 of their income for 2016.
    In 2017, a married couple would have the first $17,500 of their taxes exempted from their income. Other taxpayers would also have a larger part of their income exempted from taxes.
  • North Carolina has been voted the #3 best state for business for the second year in a row, according to an annual survey of CEOs conducted by Chief Executive Magazine. State officials point to the newly released rankings as demonstrating that leaders of businesses favor states with pro-growth tax and regulatory policies. “We have modernized our tax code saving hardworking families and business owners $4.4 billion, fixed our broken unemployment insurance system and championed an economic development strategy to put more people back to work,” said Governor McCrory in a press release. “It’s no surprise that these reforms, and more, have positioned North Carolina as one of the most attractive states for business in the country.” According to the Governor's office, North Carolina has had the fastest growing economy in the country. The state added over 275,000 new private-sector jobs since 2013.
  • Senate Bill 843 would require 1.5-mile safety buffer for wind, solar farms. Co-sponsor says renewable energy poses environmental risks. Bill includes protections for bats, birds, landowners and military flight paths.
  • NAHB Economics estimates that 14 million American households are priced out of the market for a new home by government regulations that, on average, increase the new home price by 24.3%. Households become “priced out” when they no longer qualify for a new home mortgage because of higher prices.  For more information on this article visit http://eyeonhousing.org/2016/05/14-million-households-priced-out-by-government-regulation/?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=eoe0519
  • New NAHB estimates based on the latest data show that, on average, regulations imposed by government at all levels account for 24.3 percent of the final price of a new single-family home built for sale. 
    This report is available to the public as a courtesy of HousingEconomics.com at http://www.nahbclassic.org/generic.aspx?sectionID=734&genericContentID=250611&channelID=311&_ga=1.50620009.1344555949.1464003430

Regional:

  • The Raleigh-Durham area ranks as one of the best value propositions for investors of commercial real estate in the U.S., according to the latest Situs RERC Value vs. Price Index, especially for office, industrial and apartment properties. The Situs report for the first quarter ranks Raleigh at No. 1 for industrial property value among the 26 secondary markets surveyed for the report. The Triangle also ranked at No. 2 for office property value, No. 3 for apartment property value and No. 11 for retail property value. The region bested Charlotte, Atlanta, Austin and Nashville in every category except retail.
  • The Department of Environmental Quality tried a new way to address the pollution in Jordan Lake, which is also a source of drinking water for hundreds of thousands of people. The devices are called SolarBees, and about three dozen of them have been floating on the lake for just under two years. The secretary of the DEQ is suspending the project after a report shows the SolarBees provided “no significant change in water quality.” Now that the SolarBee project is ending, environmental groups are calling on DEQ to better address the problem.


Wake County:

  • Wake County Manager Jim Hartmann presented his $1.2 billion recommended budget for Fiscal Year 2017 to the Wake County Board of Commissioners during its regular meeting. His proposal – a $56.8 million increase over the county's FY2016 budget – will help address the increasing demands placed on county services as the population continues to grow on average by 64 people each day. A key component of the recommended budget is a 1.35-cent property tax increase above the revenue neutral rate of 58.7 cents, which would generate nearly $18.8 million in new revenue. At the new rate of 60.05 cents on the average home value of $268,600, the additional tax over the revenue neutral rate would be $36 annually. 

Apex:

  • Construction began on a new Triangle Expressway interchange April 4. It will provide access to Old Holly Springs-Apex Road. It will encourage more residential and commercial development in southern Apex and western Holly Springs.
  • The top spot in Apex will be filled by a familiar face. At their May 3rd meeting, the Town Council appointed Drew Havens as the Apex Town Manager. Havens had been serving in an interim role for the last four months.
  • NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING AMENDMENTS TO THE UNIFIED DEVELOPMENT ORDINANCE (UDO) Notice is hereby given of a public hearing before the Apex Town Council for the purpose of soliciting comments relative to the following amendments to the Unified Development Ordinance, Meeting Location: Apex Town Hall 73 Hunter Street Council Chamber, 2nd Floor Meeting Date and Time: June 7, 2016 7:00 P.M.:

1.      An amendment to Sec. 2.3.4(F)(1)(a)(ii) to refer to the 2030 Land Use Map for requirements of Planned Unit Developments (PUDs) in Mixed Use areas.

2.      An amendment to Secs. 2.3.4(F)(2)(a)(xv) and 2.3.4(F)(2)(b)(ii) to refer to the 2030 Land Use Map for requirements in Traditional Neighborhood Districts (TNDs) in Mixed Use areas.

3.      An amendment to Sec. 2.3.4(F)(3)(a)(iii)(a) to refer to the 2030 Land Use Map for requirements of Major Employment Centers (MECs) in Mixed Use areas.

4.      An amendment to Sec. 3.3.1(I) MORR Mixed Office-Residential-Retail District to add a reference to the 2030 Land Use Map.

5.      An amendment to Sec. 3.3.3(A)(1) MEC-CZ Major Employment Center District to add a reference to the 2030 Land Use Map.

6.      An amendment to Sec. 3.3.3(B) TND-CZ Traditional Neighborhood District to add a reference to the 2030 Land Use Map

7.      An amendment to Sec. 3.3.3(C)(1) PUD-CZ Planned Unit Development District to add a reference to the 2030 Land Use Map.

Cary:

  • Annual Budget Proposal: $319 Million, $227.8 million operating plan and dedicates another $91.4 million to support capital improvements. The combined monthly garbage, recycling and yard waste fee would remain unchanged at $16 per month; Cary utility customers would see a 3.8 percent increase in water and sewer rates—or about $2.85 more per month for residents using 5,000 gallons of water. Other notable fee changes include increases in several fees associated with reviewing development plans to help the Town recover approximately 60-percent of the actual cost of service; Interim Manager Bajorek is also recommending creating new fees for residential and commercial encroachment permits on the Town rights-of-way to offset the rising costs of reviewing permit applications for gigabit fiber installation throughout town. As for property taxes, Bajorek’s plan lowers the Town’s property tax rate by two cents -- from 37 cents to 35 cents per $100 valuation.  If approved by Town Council, the tax rate is expected to remain the lowest in Wake County and result in a tax bill of $750 for a $200,000 home.
  • As Cary continues its plan for the next era in the town’s future, the next phase of Imagine Cary will soon be asking community members for their feedback when it comes to changes in the way Cary redevelops its land. 

Cary-Morrisville Joint Issues Committee:

  • Here are some of the notable items from the last meeting:
    • The NC54 corridor study from Maynard Road to I-540 has been completed by DOT. Staff has not heard the results of this study. Funding for the portion from Morrisville to I-540 has been approved by the state. There is currently no funding for the Maynard Road to Cary Parkway portion.
    • The Western Corners development will be held to partial CO’s until all road improvements have been completed.
    • Schools and public private partnerships were discussed. Morrisville should get state approval for a Charter High School soon. This will open in 2017 and will be a Montessori-type high school.
    • The Wake Transit Plan will be presented to the county commissioners in June for a vote. It is anticipated this will be on the ballot for voter approval in the fall.
    • Morrisville is working with the county to get a community library.
    • Morrisville 911 calls go to Raleigh for dispatching. This is slowing their response times. Staffs are investigating having them use the Cary 911 center.
    • A proposal for 70 homes on Morrisville-Carpenter road is being considered. A discussion was held on potential developments on that road and the impact. It was decided that staff should present a comprehensive look at all east-to-west connectors at our next meeting.
    • Morrisville expressed concern about the Kellogg expansion. To date the expansion is planned to be capital improvements which will not add more employees and create more traffic.
  • Construction and activity report for April. Here are some of the items of interest:
    • Town staff approved 57 townhomes, 167 single family dwellings, and about 50,000 square feet of non-residential.
    • A sketch plan for the Cary Town Center was approved.
    • Permits were issued for 2 multi-family units, 146 single family dwellings, and 53 non-residential.
    • The average single family dwelling was 3773 square feet as compared to 3215 square feet in 2012.
    • Cary accounted for 14.6% of all permits issued in Wake County, second only to Raleigh.
    • CO’s were issued for 71 multi-family units, 62 single family dwellings, and over 245,000 square feet of non-residential. 

Chapel Hill:

  • Town Manager Roger Stancil presented to the Council his recommended budget for Fiscal Year 2016-2017. For the third consecutive year, the budget calls for no tax increase, thanks to modest increase in overall revenues and prudent financial planning. Property taxes now are projected to make up just less than half the Town budget revenues – at 49 percent.  And sales tax revenues are increasing – about a six percent increase. There is a 21 percent increase in State Shared Revenues, which includes a growth in utility sales taxes due to a change in the state's distribution formula. Under the spending plan, tax amounts supporting the Town remain unchanged and total 52.4 cents per $100 assessed value. The Town tax bill for the owner of a property valued at $350,000 would remain at $1,834. The total amount Chapel Hill residents pay in property taxes also depends on the actions of the Board of Orange County Commissioners, which set the county tax rate and the special schools tax for Chapel Hill-Carrboro City Schools. The property tax bill that Chapel Hill residents pay is divided among Chapel Hill-Carrboro City Schools (54 percent), the Town of Chapel Hill (33 percent), and Orange County (13 percent). Residents who live in the Durham County portion of Chapel Hill see slightly different tax bills due to the actions of the Durham County Commissioners. 

Durham (City/County):

  • Mark your Calendars- Upcoming Coffee Chat with City of Durham Elected Officials and Staff on Wednesday, June 15 at 8:30 a.m. RSVP to Charlenel@tricc.org.
  • Public Input Session on Future Design and Use of North Mangum Street Open Space in Downtown Durham, When: Thursday, June 2, 2016, at 6:30 p.m. Where: Temple Building 302 West Main Street Durham, N.C. 27701 The Durham City/County Planning Department and City of Durham General Services Department are hosting a public input session for residents and stakeholders regarding the future design and use of City-owned public open spaces along North Mangum Street in downtown Durham. This meeting will focus primarily on the open space on three parcels along North Mangum Street between West Parrish and West Main streets known colloquially as “Chickenbone Park.” Meeting participants will engage in interactive activities to provide input on uses and the future of this space.
  • City Manager Tom Bonfield proposed a 1.66 cent tax rate increase above the City’s revenue-neutral rate of 54.41 cents per $100 of assessed value, following Durham’s most recent revaluation of real property. The new proposed tax rate would be 56.07 cents per $100 of assessed value, reflecting a decrease of 3.05 cents from the current tax rate of 59.12 cents. Bonfield recommends a total preliminary budget for FY 2016-17 of $403.7 million, a nearly 4 percent increase from last year, and includes a $180.9 million budget for services covered by the general fund, a little more than 5 percent increase from last year. 

Fuquay-Varina:

  • A mixed use development at a key entrance to Fuquay-Varina is on the way, and the site is likely to include a new supermarket for the growing community. Kenney Development wants to build a $50 million mixed-used development in Fuquay-Varina on 50 acres at the intersection of N.C. 55, also known as North Broad Street, and Old Powell Road. Tentatively named Powell Square, the development would have about 265 luxury apartments as well as retail and office space.

Garner:

  • Garner on May 24 held the kickoff for its comprehensive growth plan update. A 14-member steering committee made up of citizens and elected officials will inform, guide and provide feedback to the technical staff working on the project, which is expected to be completed in spring 2017. The Town will use a variety of means to engage citizens during the process. The objective is to craft a 10- to 15-year land-use and transportation plan for the Town. For more information, contact Planning Director Brad Bass atbbass@garnernc.gov.
  • Wake County Public Schools held a groundbreaking earlier in May for Bryan Road Elementary School (8317 Bryan Road), slated to open in August 2017. The 109,400-square-foot school in south Garner is designed to accommodate a core capacity of 800 students. 
  • The Town Council on May 2 approved a 41-lot, single-family-home subdivision at Garner and Vandora Springs Roads. The 18-acre subdivision, to be called Kelly’s Crossing, will have price points over $200,000, according to the developer, Hopper Communities.

Holly Springs:

  • Town Manager Chuck Simmons is recommending an increase to water and sewer monthly access fees totaling $2 per month, or $24 per year. There would be no change in utility user rates. As part of a $46.2 million budget, Simmons also is recommending a revenue neutral property tax rate of 43.25 cents per $100 valuation – a decrease from this year’s 43.5 cent tax rate. 

Raleigh:

  • North Hills developer John Kane has announced details of a joint-venture project with Williams Realty & Building Co. to build a $100 million, mixed-use, multi-family building project in downtown Raleigh that could also bring the first grocery store to the downtown district. Neither Kane nor Williams are detailing tenant plans for the retail portion of the project, but Kane says the new building campus at the corner of Peace and West streets, near the intersection of Capital Boulevard, will include more than 400 new residential rental units, covered parking and complementary retail.
  • The proposed total City budget for FY17 is approximately $858.6 million, an increase of 3 percent from the FY16 total City budget of $832.5 million. The General Fund total operating budget comes to approximately $465.9 million. The proposed five-year Capital Improvement Plan (CIP) budget totals $1.25 billion. The budget proposal would lower the property tax rate by 0.27 cents from the current 42.10 cents, down to 41.83 cents. By not lowering the property tax rate to the revenue neutral rate of 39.83 cents, 1 cent of tax revenue, or $5.7 million, would be allocated to expand the City’s affordable housing program and 1 cent of revenue, $5.7 million, would be allocated to fund the debt service on the Dorothea Dix property acquisition. A public hearing on the proposed budget and CIP will be held June 7 at 7 p.m. in the City Council chamber on the second floor of the Avery C. Upchurch Government Complex, 222 W. Hargett St. The City Council will conduct budget deliberation sessions on June 6, June 13, June 20, and June 27, if needed. All sessions will be held at 4 p.m. in the Council Chamber. They will be carried live on RTN11 (97.5) and video-streamed on the City of Raleigh’s website, www.raleighnc.gov.
  • Comprehensive Plan Text Amendments:

 TCC News:  Our Luncheon Learn Series covers the hottest topics
surrounding real estate, development, and growth in the Triangle.

Housing Affordability Part Deux -
With a Better Understanding of the Need,
Let’s Explore Collaborative Ways to Address it!

Last month we gathered local experts to discuss housing affordability
and the challenges the Triangle is facing and what some of the local
governments are working on.  As part II of the series of Housing Affordability, the Triangle Community Coalition has brought together another group of experts  who are ready to discuss market approach solutions to Housing Affordability. 


Keynote Speakers:
Jim Anthony, Colliers International
Ted Van Dyk, New City Design Group
Representative Mike Hager, NC House of Rep. D112
Robert Dietz,
Chief Economist, National Association of Home Builders

On-line Registration

 A Special Thank You to Our 2016 Members and Sponsors!

Strategic Members:  Raleigh Regional Association of REALTORS® &  HBA Raleigh-Wake County
Partner Members:     Smith Moore Leatherwood   Colliers International   Smith AndersonTaylor Wiseman & Taylor   Triangle Apartment Association

Business Members:   Bass Nixon & Kennedy   Bohler Engineering   CalAtlantic   Community Properties   Duke Energy   Fern Hill Properties   Fonville Morisey Barefoot   Gaines & Co.  Grubb Ventures   JPM South Development   Kane Realty   K&L Gates   Kimley-Horn & AssociatesLennar   M/I Homes   McAdams   Morningstar Law Group  Paragon Commercial BankPulte Group   Robuck Homes   Sepi Engineering   SheetzWilliams Property Group  Withers & Ravenel   Woodfield Investments, LLC

Chamber/Gov:  Cary Chamber of Commerce   Morrisville Chamber of Commerce  Raleigh Chamber of Commerce   Midtown Raleigh Alliance     

 Sponsors:  Allen Tate Companies

 

TCC "in the KNOW" April 2016

April 2016 Updates 

North Carolina:

  • Gov. Pat McCrory announced that his $22.8 billion budget proposal won’t include the income tax cuts sought by legislative leaders and would give state employees a one-time bonus averaging 3 percent. The full budget plan was released Wednesday morning as legislators met to discuss a spending plan for the fiscal year that begins in July. Overall, McCrory’s budget includes a 2.8 percent increase in spending – a bit more than the 2 percent target Senate leader Phil Berger suggested this week. 

Chatham County:

  • The Chatham County Commissioners narrowly approved an option to purchase a 1,818 acre site, known as the mega site, in hopes of attracting a major manufacturer. The Chatham County Commissioners voted 3-2 to enter into a contract with the owners of the site for a one-year option to bring in business. After that time the county would have the option to purchase all or a portion of the land, which is currently privately owned. 

Orange County:

  • The Board of Orange County Commissioners will be taking public comment on the upcoming bond. If passed in November, it will be the largest in county history at $125 million. Up to $120 million dollars is planned to make necessary health and safety upgrades to Orange County Schools and Chapel Hill-Carrboro City Schools. This would be the first step in acquiring the funding needed to finance over $300 million in repairs. Another $5 million dollars is expected to go towards affordable housing. The meeting will begin at 7:00 p.m. at the Southern Human Services Building in Chapel Hill. A hearing will be held in Hillsborough May 5 at the Whitted Building, which will also begin at 7:00 p.m. 

Wake County:

  • Wake County Transit Plan: Wake to Hold Public Sessions, Public Hearing on Recommended County Transit Plan- The recommended Wake County Transit Plan (Plan) is designed to change transportation in Wake County by offering more frequent bus service that covers larger areas and spans longer hours, rapid bus service along major transportation corridors, and commuter rail linking Garner, Raleigh, NC State University, Cary, Morrisville, Research Triangle Park, and Durham. The Plan works to connect the region across county lines, connect Wake County communities to the transit network, provide frequent, reliable urban mobility to communities around the County, and give enhanced access to transit across Wake County. This Plan would quadruple transit service investment in the first ten years of implementation, tripling bus service.

    You can view the recommended Wake County Transit Plan here:

     
  •  http://www.waketransit.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/Recommended-Wake-County-Transit-Plan_12-07-15.pdf

PUBLIC HEARING- Wednesday, May 18, at 5:00 P.M. at Raleigh Convention Center: 500 S. Salisbury Street, Raleigh, NC 27601

INFORMATION SESSIONS:

Monday, May 2, from 4-7 P.M. at the Wake County Southern Regional Center, Room 182; 130 N. Judd Pkwy NE, Fuquay-Varina

Thursday, May 5, from 4-7 P.M. at the Apex Community Center, Summit Room, 53 Hunter Street, Apex

Monday, May 9, from 4-7 P.M. at the Wake County Northern Regional Center, Room 163; 350 E. Holding Avenue, Wake Forest.

Monday, May 16, from 4-7 P.M. at the Wake County Eastern Regional Center, Room 156; 1002 Dogwood Drive, Zebulon. 

HOW TO COMMENT ON THE RECOMMENDED PLAN

There are several ways to submit comments on recommendations in the Plan: By email: waketransit@wakegov.com 

By postal mail to: Wake County Transit Plan, c/o GoTriangle, P.O. Box 13787 RTP, NC 27709

By comment card at public hearing and four public information sessions

In person, verbally, or at a joint CAMPO/GoTriangle public hearing. All comments will be gathered and presented to the members of the CAMPO Executive Board and the GoTriangle Board of Trustees. 

PUBLIC HEARING & INFORMATION SESSIONS

A formal public hearing on the recommended plan will be held on May 18, 2016. Each speaker will be allowed two (2) minutes to comment. Wednesday, May 18, at 5:00 P.M. at Raleigh Convention Center: 500 S. Salisbury Street, Raleigh, NC 27601. There will be a formal presentation at 5:00 P.M. The hearing is being held to solicit comments regarding the recommended Wake County Transit Plan and draft Interlocal Agreement. Hearing participants will have the opportunity to provide verbal comments on the recommended plan (limited to 2 minutes per participant). Hearing participants will also have the opportunity to submit comments in writing during the hearing. Comments received verbally and in writing will receive equal weight. All comments submitted for the record will be reviewed and considered by CAMPO’s Executive Board and GoTriangle’s Board of Trustees before adoption of the Plan and the draft Interlocal Agreement. 

CAMPO and GoTriangle will also hold four joint public information sessions in advance of the public hearing:

1.      Monday, May 2, from 4-7 P.M. at the Wake County Southern Regional Center, Room 182; 130 N. Judd Pkwy NE, Fuquay-Varina

2.      Thursday, May 5, from 4-7 P.M. at the Apex Community Center, Summit Room, 53 Hunter Street, Apex, NC 27502

3.      Monday, May 9, from 4-7 P.M. at the Wake County Northern Regional Center, Room 163; 350 E. Holding Avenue, Wake Forest.

4.      Monday, May 16, from 4-7 P.M. at the Wake County Eastern Regional Center, Room 156; 1002 Dogwood Drive, Zebulon. 

Wake County School Board:

  • Three candidates announced that they plan to run for seats on the Wake County school board. Peter Hochstaetter, 35, a corporate trainer who lives near Wake Tech’s main campus on Fayetteville Road, and Gary Lewis, 50, a longtime PTA volunteer from Cary, both plan to run for the District 7 seat. The district includes parts of Garner, Fuquay-Varina, Holly Springs, Apex and Cary. Don Mial, 63, a retired state employee who lives near Knightdale who worked in the juvenile justice system, will run for the District A seat that covers about half the county. District A includes most of the area of the old Raleigh city limits, inside the 440 Beltline. 

Apex:

  • Council recently voted to require 30% non-residential in all mixed use developments. It's going to planning board and back to Council, but likely to pass.
  • The town wants to know if Veridea’s a safe bet before it turns to seldom-used financing strategy. Development group’s desire to develop residential areas first conflicts with town priorities. Investors are eager to see returns on long-delayed development.
  • After a lively debate at the April 12th Planning Commission, the Council voted 3-2 at the April 19th meeting to direct staff to prepare a UDO Amendment to specifically require a minimum of 30% non-residential in Mixed Use Area shown on the 2020 Land Use Plan.  Planning Board will make recommendations on May 9th for likely action to adopt at the May 17th Council meeting.
  • TCC has held three (3) Task Force meetings to discuss the ongoing Economic Study and Market Analysis for the 3,000 Acre Study Area.  The Task Force is preparing a position statement in support of the report findings to help reinforce some of the key issues currently facing development in Apex at the upcoming public hearing on May 3rd with both the Planning Board and Council.

Ø  The reports highlights that the extension of Richardson Road and access to public utilities are essential.  Growth pays for infrastructure. 

Ø  The report highlights that Class A Office prefers urban (i.e., Downtown Raleigh) and vibrant mixed use sites (i.e. North Hills or possible Veridea) over suburban campuses. 

Ø  The report highlights that most household incomes and available housing prices in Apex are above the medians.  To ensure affordability and a viable mix of uses, more small lot, single family lots and townhomes will be needed to attract commercial uses, lower the average home price, create better amenities, and allocate more open space. 

Ø  The report does not highlight a minimum percentage of non-residential for each mixed use node.  Rather, the report simply identifies what the market demand may be for each node and offers are overall perspective of how retail needs housing and office needs retail for the Study Area to be economically viable.

Ø  The report highlights many of the things that make Apex the #1 Best Place to Live in America according to MONEY (Economy, Housing Affordability, Education, Health, Arts & Leisure, and Ease of Living) that has only been made possible with growth

  • Development Plans in April:
    • Rezoning approval to Commercial for 4.67 acre site across from the West Apex HS on Roberts Road
    • Annexation and Master Subdivision approval for 17.33 acres and 50 lots for Cheslea Run
    • Annexation for Phase 2 portion of Greenmoor developments with previous approval of Rezoning Petitions and Residential Master Subdivision Plans
    • Quasi-Judicial Major Site Plan approval for Apex Friendship Middle School 

      Cary:
  • The Town of Cary is creating a new Developmental Services Department and has named Scot Berry its first director. One of Berry’s first tasks will be to meet with stakeholders in the community for their input on development in Cary so far. Berry says improving the city’s customer service is at the heart of what he does in Cary.
  • Cary will expedite adopting a plan for the eastern gateway area where Cary Towne Center and a 90-acre state-owned property are located. The process will take about four months and will include opportunities for public input. This will lay out the Cary Town Council’s vision for any applicant interested in developing in the area.
  • LDO Round 34 Amendments are going to the Planning & Zoning Board for public hearing in June. 
    Proposed changes include removing any and all sizes of Sweetgum trees from being considered Champion Trees, Transportation & Facilities Director can approve and accept Payment in Lieu for items not able to be constructed as part of a site/subdivision plan without going to Council.  This provision also includes utility lines, for example, Reclaim Water lines.  Partial payment in lieu still needs council approval.
  • Removal of the UTBs from the definition of calculation of the base number of lots in determining lot yield
    in a conservation overlay district. 

Chapel Hill:

  • The Chapel Hill Town Council recently approved a contract that could allow Chapel Hill Transit to purchase up to 53 new clean diesel buses, a month after residents asked for an analysis of more environmentally friendly alternatives.
  • The Chapel Hill Town Council approved a special use permit for a 62 single-family home development for the Merin Road Community. The applicant proposes that the affordable units would be sold to the Community Home Trust and then priced for sale to potential buyers earning less than the median income for the area.
    80 percent area median income (AMI) and 100 percent AMI. Prior to the issuance of a Zoning Compliance Permit, the applicant must submit an Affordable Housing Plan.   
  • Public Improvement Project: Rosemary Street between Henderson Street and Merritt Mill Road, the project will widen sidewalks; improve sidewalk ramps so they meet ADA standards; install new pedestrian level light fixtures with LED lights; replace curb and gutter sections and driveway ramps; and repave the street. Improvements include a brick amenity strip with street trees, bike racks, and trash and recycling containers. Funded with $1.6 million in street and sidewalk voter-approved bonds, the improvements are outlined in the Downtown Streetscape Master Plan. The Town has been working to acquire right-of-way or public use easements to connect sidewalks on Rosemary Street.
  • Schools Adequate Public Facilities Ordinance (SAPFO) 2016 Annual Technical Advisory Committee Report: The Council considered the 2016 SAPFO Annual Report from Orange County and will provide their input
    to the Orange County Board of County Commissioners. On July 17, 2003, Orange County, Carrboro, Chapel Hill and the Chapel Hill-Carrboro City Board of Education entered into a Schools Adequate Public Facilities Memorandum of Understanding. The memorandum calls for an annual report to document capacity and enrollment (membership) at each school level (elementary, middle school, high school). Current 10-year student growth projections show no future needs for additional schools in the Chapel Hill-Carrboro City Schools District. 

Durham (City):

  • TC1500002 – Technical Changes: UDO Graphics. A text amendment consisting of new and/or revised graphics to better illustrate certain standards within the UDO. These standards include Sec. 6.8, Infill Development in Residential Districts; Sec. 9.9, Fences and Walls; Sec. 10.4.4, Design Standards for Bicycle Parking; and Sec. 16.3, Defined Terms. (Contact: Michael Stock, AICP, Senior Planner, 919-560-4137, ext. 28227)
  • TC1500006 – Reasonable Accommodations. A text amendment to establish a process for allowing individuals with disabilities a mechanism for relief, or reasonable accommodation as required by the federal Fair Housing Act and Americans with Disabilities Act, from requirements of the UDO through a quasi-judicial approval process. (Contact: Supriya Chewle, AICP, Senior Planner, 919-560-4137, ext. 28271)
  • TC1500007 – Technical Changes: Revisions Due to State Legislation. A text amendment to revise certain sections of the UDO to comply with recently enacted state legislation. (Contact: Michael Stock, AICP, Senior Planner, 919-560-4137, ext. 28227) 

Garner:

  • The Garner Town Council approved a site plan Tuesday night for a new $8.9 million recreation center in the Historic Downtown Garner district. Funding for the new rec center is part of a $35.7MM bond that was previously approved.  The bond money was also used to re-task an existing building for a new police station.  Additionally, construction of a new Town Hall building is scheduled to commence immediately.
  • The Town has revised its water/sewer allocation policy to stimulate new housing and commercial development.  Highlights include:
    • Annual capacity has been increased from 75,000 gallons per day to 150,000 gallons per day, enough to support development of 600 houses per year.
    • Increased the annual number of units per project for which allocation can be granted from a maximum of 50 units to 120 units.  If a project has two or more price points the current limit of 75 units per year has been increased to 150 units per year.
    • Type II housing requirements (tied to water/sewer allocation) have been modified to reduce the minimum square footage from 2,200 SF to 1,800 SF.  Type II housing construction requirements were also relaxed to allow for stem-wall slab foundations, concrete patios, and vinyl siding.  
  • Public utility fee structure has been revised, resulting in significantly reduced development costs for residential, retail, and commercial projects.
  • The Town has commenced the process of updating its Comprehensive and Transportation plans.  The process will include a number of workshops to be held over the next 5-6 months, with the draft plans due for review in April 2017.
  • The town council voted to approve a 212-lot subdivision on New Bethel Church Road near South Garner High. The 212-lot subdivision, called Oak Park, will be on 97 acres of land. The land’s current surroundings are farmland and some residential. The public hearing didn’t feature any resistance to the plan from opponents.
  • No neighbors spoke out against it, nor did the council. It was also approved smoothly at the planning commission meeting last month.
  • Rodney Dickerson has officially been named the next town manager. He has been with the town for 15 years, including 12 as the assistant town manager when he was appointed to that position in 2004. 

Hillsborough:

  • Caruso Homes (www.CarusoHomes.com), a residential builder headquartered in Crofton, Maryland, has received approval from the Town of Hillsborough, N.C. for their Collins Ridge community, which will be located directly behind the Daniel Boone Village Shopping Center. The community, which will be situated on 124 acres owned by Elizabeth Collin's heirs, was approved as a mixed-use residential community.  Caruso Homes is finalizing an agreement with CASA development to provide 14 low income veterans homes, plus 74 additional low income homes, in this amenity-rich new home community offering a community center, pool, multiple parks, public transportation and a focus on walkability.  The large community is projected to include up to 300 market rate apartments, 200 senior targeted apartments, 300 two-story and three-story townhomes and 150 single family detached homes. 

Holly Springs:

  • A set of road projects with a price tag of more than $14 million is about to get underway in Holly Springs. The extension of Main Street and transformation of an Avent Ferry Road intersection is expected to highly reduce traffic in a very congested area. “In order to handle some of that congestion in the rush hour, we had identified a long time ago these two projects,” said Kendra Parrish, Holly Springs director of engineering. 

Raleigh:

  • Hillsborough Street Project Update: Chris Johnson from public works told Councilors that the bids for work on Phase II had been opened last week — Pipeline Utilities was the apparent low bidder — and that following an official award, the next step would be a public outreach campaign. The goal would be to inform neighbors, businesses and other stakeholders of what to expect, along with providing them details of many of the benefits the renovation will bring, including enhanced bicycle and pedestrian infrastructure and a variety of streetscape improvements. The project is anticipated to cost around $12.8 million.
  • Skeptical of a plan to widen Six Forks Road to six lanes, city leaders are going back to the drawing board. The Raleigh City Council delayed voting on the Six Forks Road corridor plan, which called for making the busy thoroughfare six lanes from Lynn Road to the Interstate 440 Beltline. Council members said they want to spend the next five months considering a four-lane plan that would include improvements for bicyclists and pedestrians. The additional planning is expected to cost $50,000.
  • The Department of City Planning is coordinating an update to the Comprehensive Plan. Adopted in 2009, policies contained in the plan call for regular updates to keep the plan fresh and adaptable in a changing world. Your participation is key to making sure the Comprehensive Plan continues to guide the development of Raleigh to meet the needs of all residents. Plan to attend one of the four community meetings in April and May. At these meetings we will share draft recommendations for amending the plan and ask for your feedback.
    • Tuesday, April 26, Carolina Pines Community Center 6:30-8:30 p.m.
    • Wednesday, April 27, John Chavis Memorial Community Center 6:30-8:30 p.m.
    • Monday, May 2, Brier Creek Community Center 6:30-8:30 p.m.
    • Thursday, May 5, Millbrook Exchange Community Center 6:30-8:30 p.m.

For more information, contact trisha.hasch@raleighnc.gov  or visit the City of Raleigh Website at

http://www.raleighnc.gov/business/content/PlanDev/Articles/LongRange/ComprehensivePlanUpdate.html

  • Upcoming Public Hearing Schedule:
    • May 3, 2016, 7:00 p.m.
      • STC-08-15 - Belvin Drive (portion) (Held open from 11/3/15 meeting)
      • STC-01-16 - North Harrington Street Alley
      • STC-02-16 - Sylvia Dean Street
      • I-40 Bridges Pedestrian Retrofit
      • Paving AR 942 and Sidewalk AR 420 - Wade Avenue Widening & Pedestrian Improvements (PW 2010-4)
      • Paving AR 943 - John's Pointe Subdivision Resurfacing (PW 2015-2)
      • Disposition of City-Owned Lots
      • Z-27D-14 - Unified Development Ordinance Remapping - Various Parcels
      • Z-43-15 - Tryon Road
      • Z-4-16 - Oberlin Road
      • Evidentiary Hearing
        • SU-1-16 - The Merrimon-Wynne House - Outdoor Amplified Entertainment Permit
    • May 17, 2016, 2:00 p.m.
      • Petition Annexations
        • Perkins Property, 3001 Club Road
    • June 7, 2015, 7:00 p.m.

§  Proposed FY 2016-17 Budget

  • Downtown Raleigh Alliance thanks those who attended the State of Downtown 2016, having their biggest turnout yet with over 600 registrants.  Below you will see a link for the digital copy of the State of Downtown Report, please feel free to forward this and use as a resource for you and your colleagues.  Also, please find the State of Downtown event survey; we’d love to hear feedback from all of you so we can continue to improve the event. 

    o   Digital State of Downtown https://issuu.com/downtownraleighalliance/docs/sodforissuu/1?e=7969060/35176092

 o   State of Downtown Survey: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/HBFK998

Rolesville

  • The Town of Rolesville was identified as one of America’s top 10 Boom town by Realtor.com. 
    For more information visit

The Triangle Community Coalition had another successful Coffee Chat with Town of Garner on Wednesday, April 20, 2016!

The Triangle Community Coalition had another successful Coffee Chat
with Town of Garner on Wednesday, April 20, 2016!

Joining our members in an informal chat were Mayor Ronnie Williams, Councilors Buck Kennedy, Kathy Behringer, Ken Marshburn and Jackie Johns.  We provided the Town of Garner with a better perspective of the Triangle Community Coalition's goal to be a proactive partner in growth and land use issues and to work with senior staff and elected officials to develop policies, regulations, and procedures to encourage economic development, produce predictable (yet flexible) outcomes for all stakeholders, and protect the community's interests. 

Town of Garner appreciated the TCC’s ability to offer objective facts and information in efforts to improve public policy debates and create effective working relationships between the business community and local government.  We had some great interaction with the TCC membership in attendance and had opportunity to talk about the following:

Mayor Williams welcomed the TCC members to the Coffee Chat and thanked everyone for attending.  He noted the staff is new to certain positions and doing an excellent job. Councilor Buck Kennedy noted that the ETJ was not be adjusted in 28 years.  The Town has grown 57% since 2001 and they expect 2-3% annually.

John Hodges, Assistant Town Manager welcomed our members and noted the Garner Information packet that included a Development Services Update in response to input from the development community.

* In April, the Town Council revised the Town’s public utility fees to encourage new development

* The Town of Garner also revised its water/sewer allocation police to reflect changing conditions in the Garner housing market and to stimulate new housing starts in the community

· Increase in the amount of annual capacity from 75K gallons per day to 150K

· Increase in the number of units per project from 50 units max to up to 120 units if capacity is available

· Change in the Type II housing requirements to reduce minimum heated size from 2,200 sq. ft. to 1,800 sq. ft.

*  Town Council modifies yard setback rules

· Staff has met with various developers/builders regarding potential single-family residential projects in Garner

· One of the recurring themes was the need for the Town to consider revising its side yard setback

· In April Town Council took action to change the following setback requirements in R-15, R-12 and R-9 districts:  Rear Yard - Reduced from 25 feet to 20, Side Yard - reduced from 10 feet to 6 minimum, 15 combined and Corner Lot side yard - reduced from 25 feet to 20

Brad Bass, Planning Department Director

* In effort to provide even better service to the development community, the Town of Garner has launched a Development Services Update newsletter. 

You may access the newsletter on the Towns we